WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION / NEW DISEASES

23-Aug-2007
With new diseases emerging at an unprecedented rate in an increasingly interconnected world, often with the ability to cross borders rapidly, global public health security depends on international cooperation and surveillance more than at any previous time in history, the United Nations health agency warned in its annual report today. UNICEF / UNTV/ IRIN

Available Language: Original
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
Original
Other Formats
Description
STORY: WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION / NEW DISEASES
TRT: 2.22
SOURCE: UNTV / UNICEF / IRIN
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: NATS

DATELINE: FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – UNTV – 2006, BRAZIL

1. Zoom in, veterinarians examining chicken

FILE - UNTV - OCTOBER 2005, CAMBODIA

2. Wide shot, ducks and chicken in market
3. Close up, chickens
4. Tilt up, from chickens to taking samples from birds
5. Close up, medical elements

FILE - UNICEF - JULY 2005, KARO TRIBE, SOUTH OMO, ETHIOPIA

6. Med shot, health worker vaccinating village child
7. Close up, baby being vaccinated
8. Med shot, young child receiving polio vaccine

FILE – UNICEF - APRIL 2005, COTE D'IVOIRE

9. Med shot, health workers on boat vaccinating children
10. Close up, baby receiving polio vaccination on boat

FILE – UNICEF - JANUARY 2005, NIGER

11. Med shot, baby being vaccinated
12. Med shot, young child with polio lying on hospital bed after surgery
13. Wide shot, young girl with polio walking with braces

FILE - UNICEF - APRIL 2004, NIGERIA

14. Wide shot, adolescent boy with polio walking with cane

FILE - IRIN - 3 MAY 2005, UIGE, ANGOLA

15. Tracking shot, jeep with relative of Marburg Disease together with staff in protection suits
16. Med shot, WHO staff in protection suits who get baby who died of Marburg from maternity ward
17. Wide shot, stretcher being brought out
18. Med shot, mother crying
19. Med shot, protected staff with small sealed coffin

FILE – UNICEF - 22 SEPTEMBER 2006, BOUAKE, COTE D'IVOIRE

20. Med shot, woman receives a mosquito net to protect against malaria
21. Close up, mother sitting behind mosquito net
22. Med shot, mother and child sitting in bed underneath blue mosquito net

FILE - UNKNOWN SOURCE AND DATE - AFRICA

16. Various shots, health workers disposing bodies' victims of Ebola
17. Close up, mosquito


STORYLINE:

With new diseases emerging at an unprecedented rate in an increasingly interconnected world, often with the ability to cross borders rapidly, global public health security depends on international cooperation and surveillance more than at any previous time in history, the United Nations health agency warned in its annual report entitled "A safer future: global public health security in the 21st century.", released today.
The report sets out the WHO strategic action plan to respond to a pandemic. It also draws attention to the need for stronger health systems and for continued vigilance in managing the risks and consequences of the international spread of polio and the newly emerging strain of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB).
Experts fear that the current bird flu virus, which has so far infected 321 people, killing 194 of them, could mutate to easy human-to-human transmission. The so-called Spanish flu pandemic of 1918-1920, which spread easily between humans, is estimated to have killed from 20 million to 40 million people. The experts say a new flu pandemic is not a question of if but of when.
The report notes that since 1967, at least 39 new pathogens have been identified, including HIV, the deadly haemorrhagic Ebola and Marburg fevers, and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome (SARS), which emerged in China in 2003 and spread rapidly as far as Canada, infecting more than 8,000 people, over 800 of them fatally, before it was brought under control.
Other centuries-old threats, such as pandemic influenza, malaria and tuberculosis, continue to pose a threat to health through a combination of mutation, rising resistance to antimicrobial medicines and weak health systems. New threats have also emerged, linked to potential terrorist attacks, chemical incidents and radio-nuclear accidents, it adds.
Its recommendations include global cooperation in surveillance and outbreak alert and response; open sharing of knowledge, technologies and materials, including viruses and other laboratory samples, necessary to optimize secure global public health; and global responsibility for capacity building within the public health infrastructure of all countries.
The report also calls for cross-sector collaboration within Governments and increased global and national resources for training, surveillance, laboratory capacity, response networks, and prevention campaigns.
The report outlines some of the human factors behind public health insecurity, including inadequate investment in public health resulting from a false sense of security in the absence of infectious disease outbreaks; unexpected policy changes such as a decision temporarily to halt immunization in northern Nigeria in 2003, which led to the re-emergence of polio cases; and conflicts where forced migration obliges people to live in overcrowded, unhygienic and impoverished conditions heightening the risk of epidemics.
Other factors include microbial evolution and antibiotic resistance and animal husbandry and food processing threats such as the human form of bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) and Nipah virus.

=
UNifeed
Series
Category
Creator
UNICEF / UNTV/ IRIN
Asset ID
U070823a