UN / CLIMATE CHANGE

27-Feb-2007
The largest polar research programme in 50 years, with a major focus on global warming, gets under way this week with United Nations support as thousands of scientists from over 60 countries prepare to carry out 220 science and outreach projects in both the north and south polar regions. UNTV

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STORY: UN / CLIMATE CHANGE
TRT: 2.20
SOURCE: UNTV / UNICEF / IRIN
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 27 FEBRUARY 2007, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

1.Wide shot, exterior, United Nations headquarters
2. Wide shot, press conference
3. Med shot, journalists
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter Raven, Chairman, Sigma Xi:
"Our report is consistent with the IPCC report, the first part of which has just appeared and that it concludes that the long and near term efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change needs to be intensified."
5. Cutaway, journalists
6. SOUNDBITE (English) John Holdren, Professor, Harvard University:
"Climate change is real, its already happening, it's already causing harm, it's accelerating and we need to do something about it and we need to do something about it seriously soon, starting now. Out conclusions are that if the world were to go past the point of an increase above two to two and a half degrees celsius we would be in a regime where the danger of intolerable and unmanageable impact on human well being would rise very rapidly and its therefor essential in our view that the world agree on a target of not exceeding two and a half degrees celsius about pre-industrial."
7. Cutaway, journalists
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosina Bierbaum, Scientist, University of Michigan:
"If you think about it we really didn't do a very good job right now handling with floods or droughts or heatwaves  or hurricanes  and weather related loses for the year 2005 were a third of one trillion dollars. The increasing numbers of environmental refugees as sea level rises and as storms surges increase we'll be in the tens of millions of people. So we must begin to better adapt now and plan for the additional changes that are in store for us the years ahead."
9. Wide shot, press conference
FILE - IRIN -  10 APRIL 2006, SOMALIA
10. Wide shot, landscape with woman walking in front of dead cattle
11. Med shot, food distribution
12. Tilt up, malnourished child
13. Wide shot, dead cow
14. Wide shot, vultures fighting over dead meat
15. Wide shot, men moving dead cows corpse
16. Wide shot, dead cow
FILE - UNICEF -  6 FEBRUARY 2007, JAKARTA, INDONESIA
17. Wide shot, flooded street in Jakarta
18. Med shot, people stranded in flood waters,
19. Med shot, people in deep flood waters
20.  Wide shot, flood waters

STORY:

The largest polar research programme in 50 years, with a major focus on global warming, gets under way this week with United Nations support as thousands of scientists from over 60 countries prepare to carry out 220 science and outreach projects in both the north and south polar regions.

At a press conference today at the United Nations, scientists briefed journalist on their report, "Confronting Climate Change: Avoiding the Unmanageable, Managing the Unavoidable."
Peter Raven, environmentalist and Chair of  Sigma Xi, the scientific research society, said that the long and near term efforts to mitigate and adapt to climate change needs to be intensified.

John Holdren, Professor of Environmental Policy as well as Professor of Environmental Science at Harvard University said that climate change is real, that it's already happening and it's already causing harm.

Rosina Bierbaum, Dean of the School of Natural Resources and Environment at the University of Michigan said that governments are not doing a good job handling  floods or droughts or heatwaves  or hurricanes saying weather related losses last year were one third of a trillion dollars. 

The International Polar Year (IPY) 2007-2008, a programme of the International Council for Science (ICSU) and the UN World Meteorological Organization (WMO) officially beginning on 1 March, will be the fourth such event. The previous IPYs of 1882-83, 1932-33, and 1957-58, also known as the International Geophysical Year, all produced major increases in understanding the Earth system.

The IPY projects will focus on learning about the past, present and future environmental status of the polar regions, while advancing understanding about the interactions between those regions and the rest of the globe. They will also investigate the frontiers of science in the polar regions, and use the unique vantage point of the polar regions and develop observatories from the interior of the Earth to the Sun and the cosmos beyond. In addition, the projects will investigate the cultural, historical and social processes that shape the sustainability of circumpolar human societies.
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U070227b