UN / MILLENIUM GOALS - RICHARD JOLLY

18-Aug-2005
Richard Jolly, Co-director of the UN Intellectual History Project and special adviser to the administrator of the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) speaks about his views on the Millenium Goals.

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STORY: MILLENIUM GOALS / RICHARD JOLLY

TRT: 3:30

SOURCE: UNTV, IRIN, UNICEF

RESTRICTIONS: NONE

LANGUAGE: CHANNEL 1 ENGLISH / NATS
CHANNEL 2 ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: UNTV - 18 JULY 2005 - NEW YORK

SHOTLIST:

UNTV - 18 JULY 2005 - NEW YORK

1. Med shot, UN Flag
2. Wide shot, Richard Jolly and Jenkins
3. SOUNDBITE: (English) Richard Jolly, Co-Director of the UN Intellectual History Project
"we've just had the G8 Summit in Gleneagles in Scotland and that focused on two big issues - poverty reduction and global climate change. Poverty reduction, in fact the UN way back in 1961 started setting goals for poverty reduction, economic progress of developing countries. Again, it's interesting that that grew out of President John F. Kennedy coming here to the United Nations making a speech, and saying if the United States is rich enough to put a man on the moon, surely we are also rich enough to tackle poverty in all the corners of the world. And he suggested that the UN needed to develop a global development plan - known as the development decade - over the 60's to make major progress."

FILE: UN TV GENERAL ASSEMBLY 1961
4. Wide shot, John Kenedy delivering statement

UNTV - 18 JULY 2005 - NEW YORK

5. SOUNDBITE: (English) Richard Jolly, Co-Director of the UN Intellectual History Project
"About that time - a little before - 24 million children were dying a year. Now with a much larger population it's down to about 10 million. Still a scandal because many of these deaths, most of these deaths are readily preventable but still major progress as we've seen in major progress getting kids in school, bringing down literacy rates, improving life expectancy - many of the human indicators where the world is very different from where it was in 1960. "

FILE: IRIN, NIGER FAMINE 11 AUGUST 2005
6. Various shots, malnourished children

FILE: UNICEF, YEMEN, DECEMBER 2004
7. Various shots, girls at school

FILE: UNICEF, VIETNAM, 7 JULY 2005
8. Various shots, children learning to swim.

UNTV - 18 JULY 2005 - NEW YORK
9. SOUNDBITE: (English) Richard Jolly, Co-Director of the UN Intellectual History Project
"So, for example if you look at the goals for economic growth in the Kennedy era, 60 individual countries achieved the goal or exceeded it. If you look at the goals for child mortality reduction in the 1980's and the 1990's I think it is something like 130 countries achieved one of the goals there. So each individual country needs to tackle it. One of the ironies and tragedies is the nought point 7 percent goals for aid has been achieved only by five industrial countries to give a reasonable share of their income."

FILE: UNICEF - MYANMAR TSUNAMI - 17 JANUARY 2005
10. Various shots, food distribution

FILE: UNTV - JUNE 2005 - UGANDA - PABBO VILLAGE
11. Wide shot, women carrying food bags
12. Wide shot, children picking rains from floor
13. Wide shot, bags with grains for distyribution


STORYLINE:

At a UNTV interview Dr. Richard Jolly, Senior Research Fellow at The CUNY Graduate Center and Co-director of the UN Intellectual History Project, talked about the UN Milenium Goals, due to be reviewed by the General Assembly at a summit to be held in September.

SOUNDBITE: (English) Richard Jolly, Co-Director of the UN Intellectual History Project
"we've just had the G8 Summit in Gleneagles in Scotland and that focused on two big issues - poverty reduction and global climate change. Poverty reduction, in fact the UN way back in 1961 started setting goals for poverty reduction, economic progress of developing countries. Again, it's interesting that that grew out of President John F. Kennedy coming here to the United Nations making a speech, and saying if the United States is rich enough to put a man on the moon, surely we are also rich enough to tackle poverty in all the corners of the world. And he suggested that the UN needed to develop a global development plan - known as the development decade - over the 60's to make major progress."

According to UN reports the number of people living in extreme poverty has fallen off by 130 million worldwide since 1990, according to The Millennium Development Goals Report 2005, even with overall population growth of more than 800 million in the developing regions since then.

SOUNDBITE: (English) Richard Jolly, Co-Director of the UN Intellectual History Project
"About that time - a little before - 24 million children were dying a year. Now with a much larger population it's down to about 10 million. Still a scandal because many of these deaths, most of these deaths are readily preventable but still major progress as we've seen in major progress getting kids in school, bringing down literacy rates, improving life expectancy - many of the human indicators where the world is very different from where it was in 1960. "

UN reports say that while rapid strides were made from 1960 to 1990 in keeping children in developing countries alive past their fifth birthday, improvement has slowed since, placing in jeopardy possibilities for reaching the target of further reducing the under-five mortality rate by two thirds by 2015.

Another under-addressed concern is that half of the developing world lacks access to improved sanitation. Vulnerability to disease is not the only result. Girls are dropping out of school, for instance, due to lack of access to sanitary facilities. Slow improvement regarding sanitation is in contrast to much better results in improving access to clean water.

SOUNDBITE: (English) Richard Jolly, Co-Director of the UN Intellectual History Project
"So, for example if you look at the goals for economic growth in the Kennedy era, 60 individual countries achieved the goal or exceeded it. If you look at the goals for child mortality reduction in the 1980's and the 1990's I think it is something like 130 countries achieved one of the goals there. So each individual country needs to tackle it. One of the ironies and tragedies is the nought point 7 percent goals for aid has been achieved only by five industrial countries to give a reasonable share of their income."
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