NPT CONFERENCE WRAP (FIRST WEEK)

06-May-2005
The world's nations gathered this week in New York to begin their review of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), and heard the head of the United Nations atomic watchdog agency renew his call for a moratorium on new fuel-cycle facilities while international controls are negotiated. UNTV

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STORY: NPT CONFERENCE WRAP (FIRST WEEK)

TRT: 3.29

SOURCE: UNTV

RESTRICTIONS: NONE

LANGUAGE: CH 1 ENGLISH / NATS
CH 2 ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 2 -4 MAY 2005, NEW YORK CITY

SHOTLIST:

2 May 2005, New York City

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations headquarters
2. Various shots, U-S, Russia, British delegations
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Mohammed ElBaradei, Director-General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA):
"We should be clear: there is no incompatibility between tightening controls over the nuclear fuel cycle and expanding the use of peaceful nuclear technology".
4. Wide shot, UN Secretary General Kofi Annan approaching podium
5. Med shot, Japanese delegation
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Kofi Annan, Secretary General, United Nations:
"We are vulnerable to the weakest link in nuclear security and safety and in our efforts to promote disarmament and prevent proliferation. And we all bear a heavy responsibility to build an efficient, effective, and equitable system that reduces nuclear threats."
7. Med shot, Iranian delegation

3 May 2005, New York City

8. Wide shot, Kamal Kharrazi, Minister of Foreign Affairs IRAN (Islamic Republic of Iran) approaching podium
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Kamal Kharrazi, Minister of Foreign Affairs IRAN (Islamic Republic of Iran):
"The inalienable right of the States to develop nuclear technology for peaceful purposes emanates from the universally accepted proposition that scientific and technological achievements are the common heritage of mankind."
10. Cutaway, U-S delegation
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Kamal Kharrazi, Minister of Foreign Affairs IRAN (Islamic Republic of Iran):
"It is unacceptable that some tend to limit the access to peaceful nuclear technology to an exclusive club of technologically advanced States under the pretext of non-proliferation."
12. Wide shot, Chun Yung-woo, Deputy Minister, Policy Planning and International Organizations Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Republic of Korea approaching podium
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Chun Yung-woo, Deputy Minister, Policy Planning and International Organizations Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, Republic of Korea:
"We view this inalienable right as indispensable to our development and sustainable development. Nevertheless, there should be proper safeguards against the possible abuse of this right by potential proliferators."
14. Cutaway, Iran delegation

4 May 2005, New York City

15. Wide shot, mayors approach podium
16. Pan left audience
17. Pull back, petitions to mayor at podium
18. Zoom in, General Assembly hall to mayor at podium
19. Pan left audience
20. SOUNDBITE (English) Yoko Ono:
""A dream you dream alone is only a dream. A dream you dream together is reality. Imagine Peace. I love you"
21. Wide shot, Yoko Ono leaves podium


STORYLINE:

The world's nations gathered this week in New York to begin their review of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT), and heard the head of the United Nations atomic watchdog agency renew his call for a moratorium on new fuel-cycle facilities while international controls are negotiated.

The "choke point" to preventing nuclear weapons development is ensuring effective control over activities involving uranium enrichment and plutonium separation, Mohamed ElBaradei, Director-General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), told the opening session of the 2005 Review Conference of the States parties to the NPT.

The month-long Review Conference brings delegations together every five years to consider the workings of the landmark agreement, which seeks to prevent the spread of nuclear weapons technology, foster the peaceful use of nuclear energy and further the goal of general and complete disarmament.

Mr. ElBaradei said the core of the accord can be summed up in two words: security and development. And while the custodians of the NPT may hold differing priorities and views, "I trust that all share these two goals: development for all through advanced technology; and security for all by reducing - and ultimately eliminating - the nuclear threat.

While acknowledging that the NPT had served the global community well for 35 years, Mr. ElBaradei said that it must be regarded as a "living, dynamic regime," capable of evolving and changing to match realities. If not, it risked fading into irrelevance, leaving all nations vulnerable and unprotected.

United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan challenged the parties to the 1968 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT) to recognize that disarmament, halting the spread of nuclear weapons and the right to peaceful use is all vital - and far too important to be held hostage to the politics of the past.

An important step would be for former Cold War rivals to commit themselves irreversibly to further cuts in their arsenals, so that warheads number in the hundreds, not in the thousands.

Kamal Kharrazi, Minister of Foreign Affairs for Iran told delegates it was unacceptable that some tend to limit the access to peaceful nuclear technology to an exclusive club of technologically advanced States under the pretext of non-proliferation.

Chun Yung-woo, Deputy Minister, Policy Planning and International Organizations Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade for of the Republic of Korea, said that Korea depends on nuclear energy and views the right to use it as indispensable for their development and sustainability, but agrees that there has to be more export control in order to prevent proliferation.

The visit by the "Mayors for Peace," who are in town to promote their vision of a global ban on nuclear weapons by 2020, coincides with the opening of the 2005 Review Conference of State Parties to the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).

The group is composed of cities around the world - led by city leaders from Hiroshima and Nagasaki - who have formally united against nuclear weapons. The non-governmental organization (NGO) is now supported by 554 cities in 107 countries and regions, endorsing the 1982 Programme to Promote Solidarity of Cities toward the Total Abolition of Nuclear Weapons.

The debate about the future of nuclear weapons is broadening to include people everywhere and their direct representatives, we appeal to governments to take heart from this development and to uphold, and take action to advance, the fundamental bargain of the NPT, thereby helping us expand and deepen the public debate.

Addressing the mayors and delegates at the ceremony, peace advocate Yoko Ono said the Hibakusa had bravely and wisely turned their experience into a warning to the world by saying, "no more Hiroshima," and that a dream alone was only a dream, but together becomes a reality.

The Conference, which kicked off Monday at UN Headquarters in New York and will run through 27 May, brings together top officials every five years to review the status of the NPT, the world's most widely adhered-to multilateral disarmament accord, with 188 States parties , including the five declared nuclear-weapon States.
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