UN / TRANSNATIONAL ORGANIZED CRIME

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07-Dec-2023 00:03:58
Secretary-General António Guterres told the Security Council that “often invisible but always insidious, transnational organized crime is a vicious threat to peace, security, and sustainable development wherever it operates.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / TRANSNATIONAL ORGANIZED CRIME
TRT: 03:58
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGES: SPANISH / ENGLISH / FRENCH / NATS

DATELINE: 07 DECEMBER 2023, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Med shot, exterior UN Headquarters

07 DECEMBER 2023, NEW YORK CITY

2. Various shots, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (Spanish) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Often invisible but always insidious, transnational organized crime is a vicious threat to peace, security, and sustainable development wherever it operates. And it operates everywhere – in all countries, rich and poor, North and South, developed and developing. Meanwhile, cyberspace is a virtual El Dorado for criminals.”
4. Med shot, Guterres at the dais
5. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The activities of transnational organized crime take many forms, but the ramifications are the same: weakened governance, corruption and lawlessness, open violence, death, and destruction. Illicit financial flows are not abstract figures. They amount to billions of missed development opportunities, lost livelihoods, and worsened poverty. On the African continent alone, more money is lost due to tax evasion, money laundering and illicit financial flows than comes in in through official development assistance.”
6. Med shot, Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Transnational organized crime and conflict feed off each other. Crime is a catalyst for conflict. And when conflict rages, crime thrives. It undermines the authority and effectiveness of State institutions, erodes the rule of law, and destabilizes law enforcement structures. From Afghanistan to Colombia, the production and trafficking of illicit drugs fueled brutal and long-lasting conflicts. And all across the world, criminal groups spread violence, fear and insecurity in their effort to control trafficking routes.”
9. Wide shot, Council
10. SOUNDBITE (French) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The Security Council has a critical role in our collective fight against organized crime. But to succeed, we must act together and stand united. Together, let us commit to create a more peaceful and stable world in which organized crime has no place. Thank you.”
11. Med shot, Council
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghada Fathi Waly, Executive Director, UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC):
“Around the world illicit markets are expanding and diversifying. All threats persist from booming cocaine markets to illicit firearms flowing into volatile areas. And emerging challenges proliferate with synthetic drugs and cybercrime evolving faster than the world can keep up.”
13. Wide shot, Security Council
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghada Fathi Waly, Executive Director, UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC):
“I would strongly encourage this esteemed Council to continue devoting its attention to the critical threat of transnational organized crime, which underpins many of the peace and security challenges you address. UNODC is committed to providing reliable data and analysis and supporting operational capacities on the ground to enable an informed and effective response.”
15. Pan left, Ecuadorian President at the stakeout
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Daniel Roy Gilchrist Noboa Azín, President, Ecuador:
“The Security Council expresses concern with the development of organized crime groups and networks, which are better equipped with new information and communication technologies and are becoming more decentralized, diversified and connected in their illicit operations, which in some cases may aggravate threats to international security.”
17. Wide shot, Ecuadorian President at the stakeout
18. Pan right, Ecuadorian President walks away


STORYLINE:

Secretary-General António Guterres said, “often invisible but always insidious, transnational organized crime is a vicious threat to peace, security, and sustainable development wherever it operates.”

Addressing a Security Council open debate today (07 Dec) on transnational organized crime, growing challenges and new threats, Guterres said that it “operates everywhere – in all countries, rich and poor, North and South, developed and developing. Meanwhile, cyberspace is a virtual El Dorado for criminals.”

He said, “the activities of transnational organized crime take many forms, but the ramifications are the same: weakened governance, corruption and lawlessness, open violence, death, and destruction.”

Guterres continued, “Illicit financial flows are not abstract figures. They amount to billions of missed development opportunities, lost livelihoods, and worsened poverty.”

He added, “On the African continent alone, more money is lost due to tax evasion, money laundering and illicit financial flows than comes in in through official development assistance.”

Guterres said, “Transnational organized crime and conflict feed off each other. Crime is a catalyst for conflict. And when conflict rages, crime thrives.”

He noted, “It undermines the authority and effectiveness of State institutions, erodes the rule of law, and destabilizes law enforcement structures.”

The Secretary-General said, “From Afghanistan to Colombia, the production and trafficking of illicit drugs fueled brutal and long-lasting conflicts. And all across the world, criminal groups spread violence, fear and insecurity in their effort to control trafficking routes.”

Guterres concluded, “The Security Council has a critical role in our collective fight against organized crime. But to succeed, we must act together and stand united. Together, let us commit to create a more peaceful and stable world in which organized crime has no place.”

Also addressing the meeting, Ghada Fathi Waly, Executive Director of United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC), said, “Around the world illicit markets are expanding and diversifying. All threats persist from booming cocaine markets to illicit firearms flowing into volatile areas. And emerging challenges proliferate with synthetic drugs and cybercrime evolving faster than the world can keep up.”

She added, “I would strongly encourage this esteemed Council to continue devoting its attention to the critical threat of transnational organized crime, which underpins many of the peace and security challenges you address.”

Waly concluded, “UNODC is committed to providing reliable data and analysis and supporting operational capacities on the ground to enable an informed and effective response.”

Before the meeting, Daniel Roy Gilchrist Noboa Azín, Ecuadorian President and President of the Security Council for the month of December, read out a presidential statement.

He said, “The Security Council expresses concern with the development of organized crime groups and networks, which are better equipped with new information and communication technologies and are becoming more decentralized, diversified and connected in their illicit operations, which in some cases may aggravate threats to international security.”

The presidential statement, proposed by Ecuador and France, was adopted by all member of the Security Council.
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