UN / CLIMATE CHANGE NOVEMBER WRAP

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05-Dec-2023 00:06:27
Ahead of COP 28, taking place in Dubai, during the month of November the Secretary-General António Guterres travelled to Nepal and to the Antarctic to highlight the devastating effects of climate change on glaciers and ice shelves. UNIFEED / FILE

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STORY: UN / CLIMATE CHANGE NOVEMBER WRAP
TRT: 06:27
SOURCE: UNIFEED / UN NEPAL / WHO / FAO / OCHA
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: RECENT

SHOTLIST:

UN NEPAL – 01 NOVEMBER, ANAPPURNA, NEPAL

1. Pan right, glaciers
2. Various shots, Secretary-General António Guterres with sherpas at Annapurna Base Camp
3. Aerial shot, melting glaciers

23 NOVEMBER 2023, ANTARCTICA

2. Wide shot, zodiacs at Chile’s Frei Antarctic base
3. Med shot, Guterres and Chilean navy officer looking at glaciers
4. Various shots, glaciers
5. Various shots, iceberg
6. Various shots, zodiacs
7. Wide shot, swimming penguins
8. Various shots, Guterres in a zodiac
9. Various shots, penguins
10. Zoom out, Guterres surrounded by penguins
11. Pan right, penguin diving into the sea
12. Zoom out from helicopter to Frei base

FILE – NEW YORK CITY

12. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

27 NOVEMBER 2023, NEW YORK CITY

13. Pan left, UN Secretary-General walking to stakeout
14. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Together, Antarctica and Greenland are melting well over three times faster than they were in the early 1990s. It is profoundly shocking to stand on the ice of Antarctica and hear directly from scientists how fast the ice is disappearing.”
15. Wide shot, press encounter
16. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“We are trapped in a deadly cycle. Ice reflects the sun’s rays. As it vanishes, more heat is absorbed into the Earth’s atmosphere. That means more heating, which means more storms, floods, fires, and droughts across the globe. And more melting. Which means, with less ice, even more heating.”

20 NOVEMBER 2023, NEW YORK CITY

17. Wide shot, press briefing room
18. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The report shows that the emissions gap is more like an emissions canyon. A canyon littered with broken promises, broken lives, and broken records. All of this is a failure of leadership, a betrayal of the vulnerable, and a massive, missed opportunity.”
19. Wide shot, press briefing room
20. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
21. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Leaders must drastically up their game, now, with record ambition, record action, and record emissions reductions. The next round of national climate plans will be pivotal. These plans must be backed with the finance, technology, support, and partnerships to make them possible. The task of leaders at COP28 is to make sure that happens.”

WHO - 28 NOVEMBER 2023, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

22. Med shot, Dr Maria Neira speaking
23. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Maria Neira, Director, Environment, Climate change and health, World Health Organization (WHO):
“We want to make sure that nobody, no one at COP, no one negotiator will leave the room without knowing how much climate change is affecting our health. Second, we want them as well to understand that we need to better prepare our health systems to become climate resilient and to cope with the terrible damage that climate change is doing to our health. And for that, we will need financial resources. We need to unlock financial resources to make sure that our health systems are the one prepared to cope with the consequences of climate change.”

29 NOVEMBER 2023, DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

24. Various shots, COP28 venue, participants

30 NOVEMBER 2023, DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

25. Wide shot, plenary meeting room
26. Wide shot, UNFCC Executive Secretary Simon Stiell at podium
27. SOUNDBITE (English) Simon Stiell, Executive Secretary, United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC):
“If we do not signal the terminal decline of the fossil fuel era as we know it, we welcome our own terminal decline. And we choose to pay with people’s lives.”

FAO - 7-11 NOVEMBER 2022, PUNJAB, INDIA

28. Drone shot, agricultural field and bales
29. Drone shot, cultivated agricultural field
30. Med shot, female farmers working
31. Med shot, female farmers in the field
32. Drone shot, field burning
33. Med shot, field burning

19-21 OCTOBER 2022, ANURADHAPURA, SRI LANKA

34. Aerial shot, farmers working in the field

FILE – FAO - ROME, ITALY

35. Wide shot, FAO headquarters

FAO - 27 OCTOBER 2023, ROME, ITALY

36. SOUNDBITE (English) Kaveh Zahedi, Director, Office of Climate Change, Biodiversity and Environment, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO):
“Agriculture and food systems have a central role to play in tackling climate change. Agriculture and food system solutions, or agrifood system solutions, can help countries with their efforts to adapt to climate change, to build resilience to climate change, to mitigate emissions, to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases, while at the same time addressing their many food security challenges.”

FAO - 11 FEBRUARY 2022, ROLINDO DISTRICT, RWANDA

37. Wide shot, female farmer standing close to a solar-powered pump
38. Med shot, female farmer operating a solar-powered pump
39. Med shot, female farmer irrigating plants
40. Close up, plants being irrigated

FAO - 19-21 OCTOBER 2022, ANURADHAPURA, SRI LANKA

41. Areal shot, farmers working in their fields
42. Areal shot, female farmer working on a paddy field

FAO - 26-29 APRIL 2022, PRACHUAP KHIRI KHAN PROVINCE, THAILAND

43. Aerial shot, shrimp aquaculture ponds
44. Wide shot, shrimp farmer catching shrimps with a net
45. Med shot, shrimp farmer checking water quality

OCHA - 22 OCTOBER 2023, BAIDOA, SOMALIA

46. Wide shot, floods
47. Close up, people cross stagnant water in IDP camp

OCHA - 17 NOVEMBER 2023, LUUQ, SOMALIA

48. Med shot, humanitarians transport supplies onto a boat

STORYLINE:

Ahead of COP 28, taking place in Dubai, during the month of November the Secretary-General António Guterres travelled to Nepal and to the Antarctic to highlight the devastating effects of climate change on glaciers and ice shelves.

The average thickness of the world’s glaciers has plummeted by almost 30 metres since 1970, and irreversible changes in the global cryosphere will affect well over a billion people who rely on water from snow and glacier melt, according to the World Meteorological Organization (WMO).

Antarctic sea ice is at an all-time low. New figures show that this September, it was 1.5 million square kilometers smaller than the average for the time of year, an area roughly the size of Portugal, Spain, France and Germany combined.

Back in New York, the Secretary-General said, “together, Antarctica and Greenland are melting well over three times faster than they were in the early 1990s.”

He said it was “profoundly shocking to stand on the ice of Antarctica and hear directly from scientists how fast the ice is disappearing.”

Guterres said, “we are trapped in a deadly cycle. Ice reflects the sun’s rays. As it vanishes, more heat is absorbed into the Earth’s atmosphere. That means more heating, which means more storms, floods, fires, and droughts across the globe. And more melting. Which means, with less ice, even more heating.”

Earlier in the month, the Secretary-General, presenting the new UN Environment Programme (UNEP) Emissions Gap Report, said the report shows that “the emissions gap is more like an emissions canyon. A canyon littered with broken promises, broken lives, and broken records.”

He said, “leaders must drastically up their game, now, with record ambition, record action, and record emissions reductions. The next round of national climate plans will be pivotal. These plans must be backed with the finance, technology, support, and partnerships to make them possible. The task of leaders at COP28 is to make sure that happens.”

The UNEP Emissions Gap Report series, now in its 14th year, provides a yearly review of the gap between where global emissions are heading with countries’ current commitments and where they ought to be to limit warming to 1.5°C. Each edition explores ways to bridge the emissions gap.

Also, in the run-up to COP28, the World Health Organization (WHO) together with the global health community issued a call to ensure that the impact of climate change on health takes centre stage in the negotiations.

WHO’s Director of Environment, Climate change and Health, Dr Maria Neira, said, “we want to make sure that nobody, no one at COP, no one negotiator will leave the room without knowing how much climate change is affecting our health.”

She said, “we want them as well to understand that we need to better prepare our health systems to become climate resilient and to cope with the terrible damage that climate change is doing to our health. And for that, we will need financial resources. We need to unlock financial resources to make sure that our health systems are the one prepared to cope with the consequences of climate change.”

The extreme weather events around the world in recent months offer a terrifying glimpse of what lies ahead in a rapidly heating world. The IPCC report says about 3.5 billion people – nearly half of humanity – live in areas highly vulnerable to climate change. Heat-related deaths among those aged over 65 years have risen by 70 percent worldwide in two decades, according to WHO’s figures. Only a dramatic and dedicated effort to limit warming to 1.5 °C will prevent a future much worse than what we see now.

Increasingly frequent and severe extreme weather events, such as droughts, floods and heatwaves, will also strain healthcare infrastructure. Last year's floods in Pakistan displaced 8 million people and affected 33 million overall. Forecasts from the World Bank indicate that without bold and immediate action, climate change could displace approximately 216 million people by 2050.

At the opening of the COP, the Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), Simon Stiell, said, “if we do not signal the terminal decline of the fossil fuel era as we know it, we welcome our own terminal decline. And we choose to pay with people’s lives.”

On the opening day, delegates meeting finalized the operationalization of a fund that would help compensate vulnerable countries struggling to cope with loss and damage caused by climate change, a major breakthrough on the first day of this year’s UN climate conference.

Also in November, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) called for transforming the way we produce, distribute and consume food, which they say offers a unique opportunity to curb greenhouse emissions.

FAO’s Director at the Office of Climate Change, Biodiversity and Environment said, “agriculture and food systems have a central role to play in tackling climate change. Agriculture and food system solutions, or agrifood system solutions, can help countries with their efforts to adapt to climate change, to build resilience to climate change, to mitigate emissions, to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases, while at the same time addressing their many food security challenges.”

On the last day of the month, the Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) reported that six months after Somalia emerged from a historic drought that pushed the country to the brink of widespread famine, another climate shock has struck as heavy rains and floods batter several areas of the country.

Since October when the rains started, about two million people have been affected by torrential rains, flash and riverine floods, with 750,000 people displaced from their homes and nearly 100 killed mostly in Southwest, Galmudug, Puntland, Hirshabelle, Banadir region and Jubaland states.
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