DUBAI / COP28 GLOBAL COOLING

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05-Dec-2023 00:03:31
According to a new report, taking key measures to reduce the power consumption of cooling equipment would cut at least 60 percent off predicted 2050 sectoral emissions, provide universal access to life-saving cooling, take the pressure off energy grids, and save trillions of dollars by 2050. UNIFEED

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STORY: DUBAI / COP28 GLOBAL COOLING
TRT: 03:31
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 05 DECEMBER 2023, DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot, COP28 venue
2. Wide shot, press conference room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Inger Andersen, Executive Director, United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP):
“We heat up; we need more cooling both of the food that we trade and process as well as of our own bodies and our medicines. The cooling sector then has to grow to protect everyone from rising temperatures, to maintain food quality and safety, to keep vaccines stable, and to keep our economies productive. These are all essential elements of sustainable development. But business-as-usual growth would double this sector's greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, which is clearly an outcome that we have to avoid.”
4. Med shot, journalists
5. Med shot, COP28 venue
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Lily Riahi, Global Coordinator, Cool Coalition:
“Cooling is a double burden. It uses a significant amount of electricity thanks to largely inefficient air conditioners in inefficient buildings, and currently, it actually accounts for 20 percent of global electricity use - that's very significant - and it is the second largest driver of cooling growth demand after industry.”
7. Wide shot, COP28 venue
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Lily Riahi, Global Coordinator, Cool Coalition:
“Cooling is also about climate justice because it's often those who are most vulnerable, who are the hardest hit by the rising temperatures and the impacts of climate change and have the least access to cooling. 1.2 billion people today don't have access to cooling.”
9. Wide shot, COP28 venue
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Lily Riahi, Global Coordinator, Cool Coalition:
“Implementing passive cooling, improving energy efficiency standards and norms, and a fast pace down of HFCS taken together and aligned these three measures can allow us to slash emissions by 60 percent and deliver significant savings for consumers and for the power sector while allowing us to get universal access to cooling.”
11. Close up, COP28 flag
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Omar Abdel Aziz, Assistant Professor of Thermofluids, American University, Cairo, Egypt:
“Making sure that the state can ensure that requirements for the efficiency, whether it's on the building side or the equipment side, it provides the ecosystem for the private business to grow their potential and eventually achieve the full potential. On the other side, private businesses and industry they want to provide support to the state in order for the state to enact minimum energy performance standards.”
13. Med shot, COP28 branding
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Omar Abdel Aziz, Assistant Professor of Thermofluids, American University, Cairo, Egypt:
“If we do not take action, what will happen is that emissions from the cooling sector will double by 2050, and at the same time, we will not have universal access for all, which means that the vulnerable across the world will still lack access to cooling and that can affect the food cold chain, the vaccine cold chain. It will also affect the people who are struggling with extreme heat waves. So again, it might result in immature deaths. At the same time, it might result in economic issues.”
15. Wide shot, COP28 venue

STORYLINE:
According to a new report launched today (5 Dec) at the COP28 climate talks in Dubai, taking key measures to reduce the power consumption of cooling equipment would cut at least 60 percent off predicted 2050 sectoral emissions, provide universal access to life-saving cooling, take the pressure off energy grids, and save trillions of dollars by 2050.

‘The Global Cooling Watch report, Keeping it Chill: How to meet cooling demands while cutting emissions’ by the UN Environment Programme (UNEP)-led Cool Coalition – lays out sustainable cooling measures in three areas: passive cooling, higher-energy efficiency standards, and a faster phase-down of climate-warming refrigerants.

Following the measures outlined in these areas would deliver the 60 percent cuts; adding rapid power grid decarbonization would reduce sectoral emissions by 96 percent.

The report was released in support of the Global Cooling Pledge, a joint initiative between the United Arab Emirates as host of COP28 and the Cool Coalition.

Today, over 60 countries signed up to the Pledge with commitments to reduce the climate impact of the cooling sector.

At the press conference launching the report, Inger Andersen, UNEP Executive Director, explained, “We heat up, we need more cooling both of the food that we trade and process as well as of our own bodies and our medicines. The cooling sector then has to grow to protect everyone from rising temperatures, to maintain food quality and safety, to keep vaccines stable, and to keep our economies productive. These are all essential elements of sustainable development. But business-as-usual growth would double this sector's greenhouse gas emissions by 2050, which is clearly an outcome that we have to avoid.”

In an interview later today, Lily Riahi, Global Coordinator of the Cool Coalition and lead author of the cooling UNEP report, said, “Cooling is a double burden. It uses a significant amount of electricity thanks to largely inefficient air conditioners in inefficient buildings, and currently, it actually accounts for 20 percent of global electricity use - that's very significant - and it is the second largest driver of cooling growth demand after industry.”

She also said, “Cooling is also about climate justice because it's often those who are most vulnerable, who are the hardest hit by the rising temperatures and the impacts of climate change and have the least access to cooling. 1.2 billion people today don't have access to cooling.”

She concluded, “Implementing passive cooling, improving energy efficiency standards and norms, and a fast pace down of HFCS taken together and aligned these three measures can allow us to slash emissions by 60 percent and deliver significant savings for consumers and for the power sector while allowing us to get universal access to cooling.”

Omar Abdel Aziz, Assistant Professor of Thermofluids at the American University in Cairo, Egypt, and co-author of cooling UNEP report, said, “Making sure that the state can ensure that requirements for the efficiency, whether it's on the building side or the equipment side, it provides the ecosystem for the private business to grow their potential and eventually achieve the full potential. On the other side, private businesses and industry they want to provide support to the state in order for the state to enact minimum energy performance standards.”

He stated, “If we do not take action, what will happen is that emissions from the cooling sector will double by 2050, and at the same time, we will not have universal access for all, which means that the vulnerable across the world will still lack access to cooling and that can affect the food cold chain, the vaccine cold chain. It will also affect the people who are struggling with extreme heat waves. So again, it might result in immature deaths. At the same time, it might result in economic issues.”
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