DUBAI / COP28 STATE OF CLIMATE

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30-Nov-2023 00:03:36
The UN Secretary-General António Guterres warned, “We are living through climate collapse in real-time – and the impact is devastating.” UNIFEED

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STORY: DUBAI / COP28 STATE OF CLIMATE
TRT: 03:36
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 30 NOVEMBER 2023, DUBAI, UNITED ARAB EMIRATES

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot, COP28 venue
2. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Things are moving so fast that a full month before the end of the year, we can already declare that 2023 is the hottest year recorded in human history.”
3. Wide shot, COP28 venue
4. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“We are living through climate collapse in real time – and the impact is devastating.”
5. Wide shot, COP28 venue
6. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“We have the roadmap to limit the rise in global temperature to 1.5 degrees Celsius and avoid the worst of climate chaos. But we need leaders to fire the starting gun at COP28 on a race to keep the 1.5-degree limit alive.”
7. Wide shot, COP28 venue
8. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“We must also go further and faster in protecting people from climate chaos.”
9. Wide shot, COP28 venue
10. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Today’s report shows we’re in deep trouble. Leaders must get us out of it – starting at COP28.”
11. Wide shot, COP28 venue
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organization (WMO):
“We have already achieved 1.4 degrees warming and that's so far, the warmest year since 1850. We have also broken records in main greenhouse gases, carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide, and carbon dioxide. We are now 50 percent above the pre-industrial concentrations. And we have started seeing growing amounts of disasters related to weather, and in many parts of the world we have broken, less comfortable temperature records.”
13. Wide shot, COP28 venue
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organization (WMO):
“We have seen a boost in the melting of glaciers. For example, in Switzerland, we have lost more than 10 percent of our glazier mass during the past two summers only, which is a record so far. And when it comes to global sea ice, we have seen record low amounts of sea ice in the Antarctic area, which is a new finding. In the Arctic, we have seen this declining trend report for a long time.”
15. Wide shot, COP28 venue
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organization (WMO):
“And one very powerful way to adapt to climate is to invest in early warning services, to avoid loss and damage which is also one of the big, big issues here in Dubai. And we have already started investments in the improvement of basic observing systems which are needed for the input of early warning service forecasts.”
17. Wide shot, COP28 venue
18. SOUNDBITE (English) Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organization (WMO):
“The aim is that by having proper early warning services in place we could avoid both human losses and also economic losses related to the growing amount of disasters caused by climate change.”
19. Wide shot, COP28 venue
20. SOUNDBITE (English) Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organization (WMO):
“I think that since the key issue in climate mitigation is that we should get rid of fossil fuels: coal, oil and natural gas. There will be recommendations that we should stop using fossil fuels which is two-thirds of the problem. And also, since the lifetime of carbon dioxide is so long, it's important to limit those activities which are leading to the rise of carbon dioxide concentration in the atmosphere.”
21. Wide shot, COP28 venue

STORYLINE:
The UN Secretary-General António Guterres warned, “We are living through climate collapse in real-time – and the impact is devastating,”

In a pre-recorded video statement at the launch of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) provisional State of the Global Climate report today (30 Nov) at COP 28, Guterres stated, “Things are moving so fast that a full month before the end of the year, we can already declare that 2023 is the hottest year recorded in human history.”

He said, “We have the roadmap to limit the rise in global temperature to 1.5 degrees Celsius and avoid the worst of climate chaos. But we need leaders to fire the starting gun at COP28 on a race to keep the 1.5-degree limit alive.”

He also said, “We must also go further and faster in protecting people from climate chaos.”

He concluded, “Today’s report shows we’re in deep trouble. Leaders must get us out of it – starting at COP28.”

At the launch and in a following interview this afternoon in Dubai, Petteri Taalas, WMO Secretary-General, confirmed that 2023 is set to be the warmest year on record and warned of worrying trends that suggest increasing floods, wildfires, glacier melt, and heat waves in the future.

He also said that data until the end of October shows that the year was about 1.40 degrees Celsius above the pre-industrial 1850-1900 baseline.

The difference between 2023, 2016, and 2020 - which were previously ranked as the warmest years - is such that the final two months are very unlikely to affect the ranking.

According to WMO’s report, the maximum Antarctic Sea ice extent for the year was a staggering one million square kilometers less than the previous record low at the end of the southern hemisphere winter.

Because of continued ocean warming and melting of glaciers and ice sheets, record sea level rise was also observed.

Meanwhile, concentrations in the atmosphere of heat-trapping carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide reached a record high last year and continued to increase in 2023.

WMO stressed that carbon dioxide levels are 50 percent above the pre-industrial era and that the gas has a long lifetime.

From deadly Cyclone Daniel in Libya in September to devastating floods in the Horn of Africa following five consecutive seasons of drought and severe smoke pollution from Canada’s forest blazes, WMO’s report highlights the grim effects of climate upheaval on lives, health, and livelihoods.

Throughout the year, communities suffering from extreme weather around the world faced food insecurity and displacement.

According to WMO, last year, renewable energy capacity grew by some 10 percent worldwide, led by solar and wind power.

The COP 28 conference will see the first-ever “global stocktake” to assess collective progress on cutting emissions and ramping up adaptation efforts and support to developing countries hard hit by a warming climate.
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