FAO / SOUTH SUDAN PASTORALISTS RESILIENCE

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29-Nov-2023 00:05:39
In South Sudan, livestock is a key livelihood for pastoralists like Michael Lokuru Kuri, but their livelihood that is threatened by conflicts due to competition for scarce resources, and by climate change. FAO

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STORY: FAO / SOUTH SUDAN PASTORALISTS RESILIENCE
TRT: 05:40
SOURCE: FAO
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT FAO ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: TOPOSA / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 1-5 OCTOBER 2023, KAPOETA SOUTH COUNTY, SOUTH SUDAN


SHOTLIST:

1. Close up, Michael Lokuru Kuri, 34, pastoralist, gathering his livestock
2. Med shot, Lokuru gathering his livestock
3. Wide shot, Lokuru grazing his livestock
4. Med shot, Lokuru walking
5. SOUNDBITE (Toposa) Michael Lokuru Kuri, pastoralist:
"Livestock is the only source of livelihood for us, the Toposa people. We eat meat, drink milk and sell livestock to support our families and use some of the money for sending our children to school."
6. Wide shot, Michael Lokuru Kuri with his herd in the village
Med shot, goats leaving their shelter
7. Close up, goat standing
8. SOUNDBITE (Toposa) Michael Lokuru Kuri, pastoralist:
"Because of the prolonged dry season, we were forced to take our animals to other borders for grazing. Drought and insecurity are our main challenges."
9. Med shot, Lokuru bringing his livestock to the water reservoir
10. Wide shot, Lokuru bringing his livestock to the water reservoir
11. Wide shot, Lokuru bringing his livestock to the water reservoir
12. Wide shot, Lokuru walking towards a solar panel
13. Med shot, Lokuru operating the solar water pump
14. Wide shot, animals drinking
15. Close up, cow drinking
16. SOUNDBITE (Toposa) Michael Lokuru Kuri, pastoralist:
"The organization has helped us by excavating a water reservoir, provided us with a solar-powered pump to supply water to the water troughs [for animals]. The solar pump has simplified everything for us. Our livestock now drink clean water pumped by the solar to the troughs."
17. Close up, Lokuru’s foot stepping on dried soil
18. Med shot, Lokuru taking a dried panicle from a sorghum plant
19. Close up, Lokuru’s hand crumbling desiccated crop
20. SOUNDBITE (Toposa) Michael Lokuru Kuri, pastoralist:
"There have been changes in the weather. Last year was okay, but this year has been very bad. The crops are dying, nothing was harvested.”
21. Pull focus, from FAO logo on a veterinarian coverall to Lokuru and others vaccinating a goat
22. Tilt down, from Lokuru’s face to a goat being vaccinated
23. Wide shot, Lokuru vaccinating a goat
24. SOUNDBITE (Toposa) Michael Lokuru Kuri, pastoralist:
"I consider myself as a leader because I have the knowledge. FAO has trained me in so many things, I give treatment and vaccination something that other people cannot do."
25. Wide shot, sheep in an enclosure
26. Close up, sheep being vaccinated
27. SOUNDBITE (Toposa) Michael Lokuru Kuri, pastoralist:
“I am still young and strong, I want to use the knowledge given to me by FAO to train other youths on how to identify unhealthy livestock, how to give treatments and do vaccinations. I still have the strength. I will train the youth and ensure they become like myself in the community."
28. Pan right, from FAO logo on a t-shirt to Lokuru preparing a vaccine
29. Wide shot, Lokuru being trained by Quinto Asaye Alex, Inspector for Veterinary Services Eastern Equatoria
30. SOUNDBITE (English) Quinto Asaye Alex, Inspector for Veterinary Services, Kapoeta, Eastern Equatoria:
“The impact of the vaccination [is] now you can see the health of livestock. As you can see the small ruminants there, look you can see the health. They are looking fine. Look, healthy, even our livestock, our cattle here, that are a bit better because of effectiveness of vaccination. Without vaccination, they would have died. And this is the main concern of this community, the main problem here.”
31. Wide shot, herd walking with a pastoralist on the background
32. Med shot, herd entering an enclosure
33. Med shot, children milking a goat
34. Wide shot, Themba Bhebhe, Country Manager, South Sudan African Development Bank
35. SOUNDBITE (English) Themba Bhebhe, Country Manager, South Sudan African Development Bank:
“This is a project which covers the region, the Horn of Africa countries, which covers the resilience and is focusing on semi-arid areas of this region. So, it covers South Sudan, Djibouti, Kenya, and Ethiopia. The project in Kapoeta is the South Sudan component, which is basically food security and other related activities.”
36. Wide shot, Lokuru checking his animals
37. Med shot, Lukuru checking a sheep
38. Close up, child milking a goat
39. Wide shot, Meshack Malo, FAO Representative in South Sudan
40. SOUNDBITE (English) Meshack Malo, Representative in South Sudan, Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO):
"One of the main challenges currently is the dire food insecurity situation. In this country, we still have over 70 percent of people who, at one time or the other are not sure where they're going to get their next meal. The production levels are low and the lack of peace due to the fighting that has taken place. The country is yet to fully recover, so that food insecurity is a big challenge. Secondly, with the global challenge of climate change, it has not been spared. And so the country finds itself in this double challenge and sometimes even triple challenge with floods, with dry conditions."
41. Close up, hand pouring flour into boiling water
42. Med shot, woman preparing a meal
43. Wide shot, family preparing to eat
44. Close up, children eating






STORYLINE:

In South Sudan, livestock is a key livelihood for pastoralists like Michael Lokuru Kuri, but their livelihood that is threatened by conflicts due to competition for scarce resources, and by climate change.

SOUNDBITE (Toposa) Michael Lokuru Kuri, 34, pastoralist:

"Livestock is the only source of livelihood for us, the Toposa people. We eat meat, drink milk and sell livestock to support our families and use some of the money for sending our children to school."

The 34-year-old pastoralist said he was raided twice and left with only five cattle. He had to work hard to rebuild the herd, as he explained, that amid tense relations with neighbouring communities in Kapoeta South County, Eastern Equatoria State in the southeastern part of South Sudan.

Earlier, the prolonged dry season had forced him to take his animals far from his village of Nakoringomo for grazing and thus heightened the risk of conflict over water resources.

SOUNDBITE (Toposa) Michael Lokuru Kuri, 34, pastoralist:

"Because of the prolonged dry season, we were forced to take our animals to other borders for grazing. Drought and insecurity are our main challenges."

In South Sudan, one of the five most climate-vulnerable countries in the world, devastating climate extremes pose significant challenges for local communities.

Following four years of extensive floods, the eastern part of the country was hit by a severe drought in 2023. Last May, some eastern regions experienced their driest month in 43 years.

Faced with water shortages and crop failures, South Sudanese farmers and pastoralists suffer from low production, low incomes, and insufficient assets to survive. Some 7.8 million people, almost two-thirds of the country's population, are acutely food insecure.

But with support from the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) through funding from the Africa Development Bank (AfDB), and in partnership with the Government of South Sudan, in excavating a 30 000 m3 reservoir and providing a solar-powered water pump, Lokuru and other pastoralists do not need to take their animals to other locations for water anymore.

SOUNDBITE (Toposa) Michael Lokuru Kuri, 34, pastoralist:

"The organization has helped us by excavating a water reservoir, provided us with a solar-powered pump to supply water to the water troughs [for animals]. The solar pump has simplified everything for us. Our livestock now drink clean water pumped by the solar to the troughs."

On Lukuru’s farm, the ravages of climate change are clearly visible in the cracked soil and withered crops on his fields. He said all crops, including the sorghum, supposed to be relatively climate-resistant, were destroyed by the sun, as he crumbled the desiccated crop through his fingers.

SOUNDBITE (Toposa) Michael Lokuru Kuri, 34, pastoralist:

"There have been changes in the weather. Last year was okay, but this year has been very bad. The crops are dying, nothing was harvested.”

So it’s all the more important for the family’s livelihood to keep their livestock healthy.

Lokuru is one of 30 community animal health workers who has been trained to administer vaccines to his animals and those of his fellow villagers in an FAO-supported training in the whole of Kapoeta South County.

The training for community animal health workers like Lukuru, who was nominated by his own community, includes administering vaccines, identifying diseases, dividing the sick animals from the healthy ones, deworming and treating them.

SOUNDBITE (Toposa) Michael Lokuru Kuri, 34, pastoralist:

"I consider myself as a leader because I have the knowledge. FAO has trained me in so many things, I give treatment and vaccination something that other people cannot do."

Lokuru now wants to share knowledge and train younger pastoralists to promote animal health and food security.

SOUNDBITE (Toposa) Michael Lokuru Kuri, 34, pastoralist:

“I am still young and strong, I want to use the knowledge given to me by FAO to train other youths on how to identify unhealthy livestock, how to give treatments and do vaccinations. I still have the strength. I will train the youth and ensure they become like myself in the community."

Quinto Asaye Alex, Inspector for Veterinary Services in Kapoeta, Eastern Equatoria, who trains Lokuru says that the vaccination project has greatly contributed to protecting the livelihoods of agropastoral communities in the area.

SOUNDBITE (English) Quinto Asaye Alex, Inspector for Veterinary Services, Kapoeta, Eastern Equatoria:

“The impact of the vaccination [is] now you can see the health of livestock. As you can see the small ruminants there, look you can see the health. They are looking fine. Look, healthy, even our livestock, our cattle here, that are a bit better because of effectiveness of vaccination. Without vaccination, they would have died. And this is the main concern of this community, the main problem here.”

Implemented by FAO on behalf of the African Development Bank and the Government of South Sudan, the project is part of the Build Resilience for Food and Nutrition Security in the Horn of Africa (BREFONS) programme, to boost the resilience and adaptive capacity of communities in the face of climate change.

SOUNDBITE (English) Themba Bhebhe, South Sudan African Development Bank Country Manager.

“This is a project which covers the region, the Horn of Africa countries, which covers the resilience and is focusing on semi-arid areas of this region. So, it covers South Sudan, Djibouti, Kenya, and Ethiopia. The project in Kapoeta is the South Sudan component, which is basically food security and other related activities.”

Meshack Malo, FAO Representative in South Sudan, says the country’s concerning level of food insecurity is a major challenge.

SOUNDBITE (English) Meshack Malo, FAO Representative in South Sudan:

"One of the main challenges currently is the dire food insecurity situation. In this country, we still have over 70 percent of people who, at one time or the other are not sure where they're going to get their next meal. The production levels are low and the lack of peace due to the fighting that has taken place. The country is yet to fully recover, so that food insecurity is a big challenge. Secondly, with the global challenge of climate change, it has not been spared. And so the country finds itself in this double challenge and sometimes even triple challenge with floods, with dry conditions."

FAO’s emergency and development projects in the country have supported local communities to build resilient agriculture-based livelihoods.

In Kapoeta, almost 400 000 households have received water harvesting and livestock services through the BREFONS programme.

In 2022, FAO and its partners helped 4.3 million people in South Sudan through seed and tool distribution, livestock support, and cash and voucher assistance.
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