UNAIDS / WORLD AIDS DAY ADVANCER

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28-Nov-2023 00:03:22
As World AIDS Day approaches, UNAIDS urges governments to empower grassroots communities worldwide to lead the fight to end AIDS. A new report by UNAIDS, Let Communities Lead, shows that AIDS can be ended as a public health threat by 2030, but only if communities on the frontlines get the full support they need from governments and donors. UNAIDS

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STORY: UNAIDS / WORLD AIDS DAY ADVANCER
TRT: 3:22
SOURCE: UNAIDS
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CHECK SHOTLIST FOR DETAILS
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: NOVEMBER 2023, ALEXANDRA TOWNSHIP, JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

SHOTLIST:

Please use the images in the context described. Unless indicated the HIV status, sexual orientation or any other characteristic of people in the images are unknown and should not be described inappropriately. If in doubt, contact UNAIDS: Sectorc@unaids.org

NOVEMBER 2023, ALEXANDRA TOWNSHIP, JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

1. Drone shot, old Pretoria road with Alexandra township on one side
2. Drone shot, shacks in Alexandra
3. Wide shot, street with Alexandra signs in the background.
4. Wide shot, crowd walking in street
5. Wide shot, Lebohang Seboni, peer educator greeting men as they enter Men’s Forum -Takuwani Riime - is a community-led organisation that mentors boys and men about health issues like HIV prevention and beyond.
6. Med shot, Lebohang pointing to key aspects of session with men.
7. Wide shot, man standing making a point with others sitting around table.
8. Wide shot, men sitting around table listening to a fellow participant.
9. Med shot, Lebohang chatting with two boys (one has a football in hand.)
10. Wide shot, Lebohang with two young boys.
11. Wide shot, Lebohang walking alone in the street.
12. Wide shot, Lebohang in the street with founder of Men’s Forum (Charles Mphephu on the left.)
13. Wide shot, exterior, Sisonke Inn where an informal gathering is taking place.
14. Wide shot, founder of Men’s Forum, Charles Mphephu, conversing with men in a circle during an informal chat at Sisonke Inn aka “tavern interventions.”
15. Close up, Charles looking at assembled men.
16. Med shot, men listening to Charles.
17. Med shot, one man asking a question to the others.
18. Wide shot, man walking in a clinic for HIV counselling.
19. Close up, sign with arrow “HIV testing and counselling.”
20. Med shot, man sits down in waiting room with other patients.
21. Med shot, man with nurse.
22. Med shot, nurse with gloves on gives man an HIV self-test kit.
23. Close up, man nods as nurse explains kit.
24. Wide shot, young man and young woman with sun parasol walking.
25. Wide shot, two women walking with young child in street.
26. Wide shot, two women from behind walking in the street with young child.
27.SOUNDBITE (English) Lebohang Seboni, Peer educator/Mentor at Men’s Forum (former mentee):
“Where I was born and how I was raised, I used to witness violence to the point where I told myself, ‘It’s a norm.’”
28. SOUNDBITE (English) Lebohang Seboni, Peer educator/Mentor at Men’s Forum (former mentee):
“I made a promise to myself that the younger men growing up in Alex(andra), they don’t have to go through what I went through.”
29. SOUNDBITE (English) Lebohang Seboni, Peer educator/Mentor at Men’s Forum (former mentee):
“My main focus with young boys is detecting that whether they have issues whereby they are living with gender-based violence at home.”
30. SOUNDBITE (English) Lebohang Seboni, Peer educator/Mentor at Men’s Forum (former mentee):
“Mostly, basically we talk with men in a session of a dialogue, it can be a session whereby we like calling them, ‘tavern interventions,’ where we go to the taverns with a group of guys and discuss issues that affect them as men.”
31. SOUNDBITE (English) Charles Mphephu, Founder, Men’s Forum NGO:
“We need to change and focus on men and change the social behaviour in terms of men’s health also, men who are neglected, who do not want to go to clinic, they don’t even have information about HIV/AIDS.”
32. SOUDNBITE (English) Nditsheni Mungoni, Prevention Adviser, UNAIDS:
“What we are struggling with especially is penetrating the hard to get communities, communities like Alexandra that are not easy to reach because people still feel you cannot go work in Alexandra, rural areas are tough too so we need to put much more investment and support community structures.”
33. SOUDNBITE (English) Nditsheni Mungoni, Prevention Adviser, UNAIDS:
“Communities are at the center of the HIV response. You are not going to win the fight, the battle against HIV/AIDS at the clinic level or the policy level, you win it at the community level.”

STORYLINE:

Sub-Saharan Africa is home to two-thirds of all people living with HIV- the heaviest HIV burden globally. Gender inequalities and harmful gender norms are powerful drivers of the AIDS epidemic and are major obstacles to ending AIDS. There has been a blind spot in the response to HIV globally, including in South Africa where there are substantial gaps in HIV service use and coverage for men and boys.

Men are less likely than women to use health services and tend to be sicker when seeking medical help. They are less likely to take an HIV test, which means they are less likely to know whether they are HIV positive. As a result, fewer South African men living with HIV start HIV treatment, and men are more likely to die of AIDS related causes (last year 23k men died vs 20k women in South Africa alone).

Gender-based violence, multiple sexual partners and the irregular use of condoms significantly increase the risks to men’s sexual partners of acquiring HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs).

Which is why Men's Forum (Takuwani Riime) aims to correct this and bring men into the equation. They are a community-led organisation providing a place for men and boys to gather, get mentoring and learn about HIV prevention and other health issues.

As World AIDS Day (1 December) approaches, UNAIDS is urging governments across the world to empower grassroots communities’ across the world to lead the fight to end AIDS. A new report by UNAIDS, Let Communities Lead, shows that AIDS can be ended as a public health threat by 2030, but only if communities on the frontlines get the full support they need from governments and donors.
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UNAIDS
Alternate Title
unifeed231128h
Asset ID
3148789