FAO / AGRIFOOD SYSTEMS CLIMATE

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20-Nov-2023 00:03:20
Transforming the way we produce, distribute and consume food offers a unique opportunity to curb greenhouse emissions, but investments are urgent to scale up the solutions available, says Kaveh Zahedi, head of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations climate division, ahead of the most important climate summit of the year, the forthcoming 28th Conference of the Parties (COP28). FAO

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STORY: FAO / AGRIFOOD SYSTEMS CLIMATE
TRT: 03:20
SOURCE: FAO
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT FAO ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 27 OCTOBER 2023, ROME, ITALY / RECENT

SHOTLIST:

7-11 NOVEMBER 2022, PUNJAB, INDIA

1. Drone shot, agricultural field and bales
2. Drone shot, cultivated agricultural field
3. Med shot, female farmers working
4. Med shot, female farmers in the field
5. Drone shot, field burning
6. Med shot, field burning

19-21 OCTOBER 2022, ANURADHAPURA, SRI LANKA

7. Areal shot, farmers working in the field

16 OCTOBER 2023, ROME, ITALY

8. Wide shot, FAO headquarters

27 OCTOBER 2023, ROME, ITALY

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Kaveh Zahedi, Director, Office of Climate Change, Biodiversity and Environment, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO):
“Agriculture and food systems have a central role to play in tackling climate change. Agriculture and food system solutions, or agrifood system solutions, can help countries with their efforts to adapt to climate change, to build resilience to climate change, to mitigate emissions, to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases, while at the same time addressing their many food security challenges.”

11 FEBRUARY 2022, ROLINDO DISTRICT, RWANDA

10. Wide shot, female farmer standing close to a solar-powered pump
11. Med shot, female farmer operating a solar-powered pump
12. Med shot, female farmer irrigating plants
13. Close up, plants being irrigated

19-21 OCTOBER 2022, ANURADHAPURA, SRI LANKA

14. Areal shot, farmers working in their fields
15. Areal shot, female farmer working on a paddy field

26-29 APRIL 2022, PRACHUAP KHIRI KHAN PROVINCE, THAILAND

16. Aerial shot, shrimp aquaculture ponds
17. Wide shot, shrimp farmer catching shrimps with a net
18. Med shot, shrimp farmer checking water quality

8 NOVEMBER 2021, DAMAN DISTRICT, KANDAHAR PROVINCE, AFGHANISTAN

19. Wide shot, tractor ploughing a field with a farmer in the foreground
20. Close up, land being ploughed by a tractor

27 OCTOBER 2023, ROME, ITALY

21. SOUNDBITE (English) Kaveh Zahedi, Director, Office of Climate Change, Biodiversity and Environment, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO): “About a third of agricultural land is currently degraded. You can imagine the potential of restoring a third of agricultural land in terms of food security, but also in terms of then building resilience, adaptation, and, of course, mitigation of emissions. The same goes for what we can do in sustainable livestock management and sustainable fisheries and aquaculture.”

MAY 2016, SOMALIA

22. Wide shot, skinny cattle grazing in dry field
23. Close up, cattle grazing in dry field

SEPTEMBER 2017, NUSA TENGGARA BARAT, INDONESIA

24. Med shot, farmer harvesting maize
25. Wide shot, corncob
26. Med shot, farmers undertaking maize milling
27. Med shot, maize milling

8 – 12 JUNE 2022, UBAY, PHILIPPINES

28. Wide shot, farmer plowing a ricefield with a buffalo

25-26 APRIL 2023, MONDULI DISTRICT, ARUSHA, TANZANIA

29. Wide shot, a Masai woman walking out of her hut

27 OCTOBER 2023, ROME, ITALY

30. SOUNDBITE (English) Kaveh Zahedi, Director, Office of Climate Change, Biodiversity and Environment of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations:
“We’re going to be taking to COP28 a piece of analysis we’ve done [at FAO] that demonstrates exactly what is the impact in terms of loss and damage in agriculture and food systems and why it’s so important to put these same communities, to put the agrifood systems, so centrally in the conversation about financing of loss and damage, in the hope, of course, that the Loss and Damage Fund is up and running, and one of the victories that we can celebrate coming out of COP28”.
19-21 OCTOBER 2022, ANURADHAPURA, SRI LANKA

31. Areal shot, birds flying over paddy fields

8 – 12 JUNE 2022, UBAY, PHILIPPINES

32. Close up, butterfly on a chili plant

JUNE 15, 2018, CHIQUIMULA PROVINCE, GUATEMALA

33. Med shot, students eating at school
34. Close up, a kid’s hand on a rice and meat dish
35. Med shot, children eating

STORYLINE:

Transforming the way we produce, distribute and consume food offers a unique opportunity to curb greenhouse emissions, but investments are urgent to scale up the solutions available, says Kaveh Zahedi, head of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) climate division, ahead of the most important climate summit of the year, the forthcoming 28th Conference of the Parties (COP28).

Agrifood systems are responsible for one-third of human-made greenhouse emissions. However, more efficient, resilient, and environmentally friendly agricultural and farming practices could reduce these climate impacts while ensuring food and nutrition security for all, explains Zahedi, Director of the Office of Climate Change, Biodiversity and Environment of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations.

SOUNDBITE (English), Kaveh Zahedi, Director of the Office of Climate Change, Biodiversity and Environment of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations: “Agriculture and food systems have a central role to play in tackling climate change. Agriculture and food system solutions, or agrifood system solutions, can help countries with their efforts to adapt to climate change, to build resilience to climate change, to mitigate emissions, to reduce their emissions of greenhouse gases, while at the same time addressing their many food security challenges.”

Through its multiple projects worldwide, FAO has identified, developed, and tested a range of agricultural and farming science-based solutions that contribute to the climate, biodiversity, and food security agendas, says Zahedi.

Some of these FAO-led innovative initiatives cover the areas of agroforestry, sustainable livestock management, environmentally friendly aquaculture and fisheries, energy-smart agriculture, and food loss and waste reduction. Another promising solution with food security and climate benefits is soil restoration, highlights Zahedi.

SOUNDBITE (English), Kaveh Zahedi, Director of the Office of Climate Change, Biodiversity and Environment of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations: “About a third of agricultural land is currently degraded. You can imagine the potential of restoring a third of agricultural land in terms of food security, but also in terms of then building resilience, adaptation, and, of course, mitigation of emissions. The same goes for what we can do in sustainable livestock management and sustainable fisheries and aquaculture.”

While agrifood systems contribute to the current climate crisis, climate change also poses a threat to global food security.

By 2050, up to 10 percent of land areas used for major crops and livestock could be unsuitable because of climate change. This is especially concerning considering that up to 783 million people faced hunger in 2022, an increase of 122 million people compared to 2019, according to the latest United Nations’s State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World report.

In the forthcoming COP28, which will take place from 30 November until 12 December in Dubai, FAO supports the negotiation process of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC).

Zahedi says that FAO also supports initiatives to scale up action and investment in agrifood system transformation, as well as the operationalization of the currently discussed Loss and Damage Fund to assist vulnerable communities.

SOUNDBITE (English), Kaveh Zahedi, Director of the Office of Climate Change, Biodiversity and Environment of the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations: “We’re going to be taking to COP28 a piece of analysis we’ve done [at FAO] that demonstrates exactly what is the impact in terms of loss and damage in agriculture and food systems and why it’s so important to put these same communities, to put the agrifood systems, so centrally in the conversation about financing of loss and damage, in the hope, of course, that the Loss and Damage Fund is up and running, and one of the victories that we can celebrate coming out of COP28”.

Together with the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), the Consortium of International Agricultural Research Centers (CGIAR) and The Rockefeller Foundation, FAO are hosting the Food and Agriculture Pavilion at COP28. The 12-day program of events focuses on how the world can sustainably transform agrifood systems, boost climate action and achieve Zero Hunger.
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