SOMALIA / HUMAN RIGHTS ART COMPETITION

Preview Language:   Original
01-Nov-2023 00:06:31
The power of art to inspire and transcend came under the spotlight at Somalia’s first-ever human rights art competition, aimed at raising awareness about human rights and fostering dialogue and debate on issues of importance to Somalis. UNSOM

Available Language: English
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
English
Other Formats
Description
STORY: SOMALIA / HUMAN RIGHTS ART COMPETITION
TRT: 4:30
SOURCE: UNSOM
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNSOM ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: SOMALI / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 01 NOVEMBER 2023, MOGADISHU, SOMALIA

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot, exteriors, the National Museum of Somalia
2. Close up, exteriors, the National Museum of Somalia
3. Pan right, exteriors, the National Museum of Somalia
4. Wide shot, guests attending the competition winner announcement and launch of the art exhibition
5. Close up shot, painting hanging on the wall
6. Med shot, guests attending the launch
7. Wide shot, painting
8. Wide shot, the Chief of UNSOM’s Human Rights and Protection Group Kirsten Young looking at a painting
9. Med shot, a painting hanging on a wall
10. Wide shot, an artist explains a painting to a guest
11. Close up, a guest listens
12. Wide shot, guests listening to an artist explaining his work
13. Wide shot, artist Abdi Aweys Hassan explains his piece of art
14. Close up, guests listening
15. Med shot, artist Abdi Aweys Hassan
16. Wide shot, pieces of art on a wall
17. Med shot, guests viewing art
18. Wide shot, a piece of art on a wall
19. Med shot, guests admire a piece of art
20. Close up, a trophy for the first-place winner
21. Med shot, a representative of the first-place winner picks up the trophy
22. SOUNDBITE (Somali)Ahmed Osman Ibrahim, State Minister for Education, Culture and Higher Education:
“I am very delighted to witness this exhibition at the National Museum where 20 artists have been selected and to witness their creativity – it’s a privilege for us to be here and encourage them.”
23. Close up, a piece of art
24. Med shot, UNSOM’s Kirsten Young viewing a piece of art
25. Med shot, an artist explains his art
26. Wide shot, guests viewing art
27. Wide shot, guests at the launch
28. Med shot, director of the National Museum of Somalia Dr. Osman Gedow Amir talks to guests
29. Wide shot, guests at the launch
30. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Dr. Osman Gedow Amir, Director, National Museum of Somalia:
“Today we are here to open this exhibition for the Somali people so that they can come, visit and learn about human rights from the paintings at this exhibition.”
31. Wide shot, an artist explains his work to UNSOM’s Kirsten Young
32. Close up, UNSOM’s Kirsten Young listening
33. Med shot, an artist talks about his painting
34. Wide shot, an artist explains his art to UNSOM’s Kirsten Young
35. Close up shot – An artist talks to UNSOM’s Kirsten Young.
36. SOUNDBITE (English) Kirsten Young, Chief of Human Rights and Protection Group, UNSOM:
“I think that the exhibition that we see today is extremely powerful. I think we have all been touched by every piece that we have seen… and it is a very special gift that the National Museum is giving to Somali citizens – that it is possible to use this gorgeous space, to share, to document the history of Somalia and the rich culture, but also issues of justice, equality and hopes and dreams.”
37. Med shot, guest viewing a painting
38. Close up, a painting hangs on a wall
39. SOUNDBITE (English) Kirsten Young, Chief of Human Rights and Protection Group, UNSOM:
“What we have seen with these pieces of art that we see all around in the room, have touched on extremely sensitive subjects and I think all of them have maintained hope. I think that is important because these are young artists and that’s how they see the future of Somalia: hopeful. In the Universal Declaration, we have cultural rights embedded in there, but there are also other articles that touch on these rights, for example, the right to freedom of expression – artists wouldn’t be able to do their work unless they can freely express themselves, similarly you must be able to enjoy the right to leisure so you have free time to be able to pursue your interests.”
40. Med shot, artist Abdi Aweys Hassan receives a plaque as the third overall winner in thecompetition.
41. Close up shot, plaque
42. Wide shot, artist Abdi Aweys Hassan receives a plaque as the third overall winner inthe competition.
43. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Abdi Aweys Hassan, Artist:
“When I applied to take part in the competition, I was not motivated by the thought
of winning. This is a win for me even if I am not the overall winner. Art can help usrelate with human rights. It is a way of raising awareness on human rights issues. I useart to highlight issues of fairness, equality and social justice. It can also play a role in
peace building.”
44. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Hodan Abdullahi Mohamed, Artist and University Student:
“I learnt a lot from this (competition). It presented an opportunity to meet fellow
artists and has been an eye opener for me. I use my arts to highlight the injustices
faced by women and girls.”
45. Wide shot, guests viewing paintings
46. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Abdulkadir Nor Hussein, The Chairperson of the Somali Academy ofScience and Arts:
“The National Museum is a living book where you can learn your culture, which needs
no translation. Just the same way you constantly visit Beerta Nabada (transl.: ‘PeaceGardens’), a tourist attraction, we also recommend you visit the Museum,”
47. Wide shot, guests viewing paintings.

STORYLINE:

The power of art to inspire and transcend came under the spotlight today (01 Nov) at Somalia’s first-ever human rights art competition, aimed at raising awareness about human rights and fostering dialogue and debate on issues of importance to Somalis.

“I am very delighted to witness this exhibition at the National Museum where 20 artists have been selected and to witness their creativity – it’s a privilege for us to be here and encourage them,” the State Minister from Somalia’s Ministry for Education, Culture and Higher Education (MoECHE), Ahmed Osman Ibrahim, said.

The government official was speaking at a ceremony to announce the winners of the competition in the Somali capital of Mogadishu. The competition, and its related exhibition, was jointly organized by the National Museum of Somalia and the United Nations.

“Today, we are here to open this exhibition for the Somali people so that they can come, visit and learn about human rights from the paintings at this exhibition,” said the Director of the National Museum, Dr. Osman Gedow Amir.

“I think that the exhibition that we see today is extremely powerful. I think we have all been touched by every piece that we have seen… and it is a very special gift that the National Museum is giving to Somali citizens – that it is possible to use this gorgeous space, to share, to document the history of Somalia and the rich culture, but also issues of justice, equality and hopes and dreams,” said the Chief of the UN Assistance Mission in Somalia’s (UNSOM) Human Rights and Protection Group, Kirsten Young.

“What we have seen with these pieces of art that we see all around in the room, have touched on extremely sensitive subjects and I think all of them have maintained hope. I think that is important because these are young artists and that’s how they see the future of Somalia: hopeful,” added Young, who also serves as the Representative to Somalia of the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR).

The exhibition ties into the UN’s activities to commemorate the 75th anniversary of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR). The UDHR is a milestone document which was proclaimed by the UN General Assembly in 1948 as a common standard of achievements for all peoples and all nations. It sets out, for the first time, fundamental human rights to be universally protected.

“In the Universal Declaration, we have cultural rights embedded in there, but there are also other articles that touch on these rights, for example, the right to freedom of expression – artists wouldn’t be able to do their work unless they can freely express themselves, similarly you must be able to enjoy the right to leisure so you have free time to be able to pursue your interests,” noted Ms. Young. Many entries The competition attracted 68 entries, with the three judges settling on a final shortlist of 20 before today’s announcement. The judging panel was made up of three independent artists.

UN human rights experts provided the shortlisted entrants with training on key human rights concepts, with a particular focus on the themes of the 75th anniversary of the UDHR: dignity, freedom and justice for all. The winner was Mogadishu-based artist Salman Osman Shariif, with Mohamed Abdulkadir Mohamed and Abdi Aweys Hassan, coming second and third, respectively. The themes of their paintings were equality, justice and freedom.

Unfortunately, Shariif was unable to attend the event as he was involved in an accident while on his way to the National Museum. He received the call about his win while being treated in hospital and joined the celebration from his hospital bed. The third-place contestant, Mr. Hassan, said that when it came to art, winning and losing were immaterial. “When I applied to take part in the competition, I was not motivated by the thought of winning – this is a win for me even if I am not the overall winner! Art can help us relate to human rights. It is a way of raising awareness on human rights issues. I use art to highlight issues of fairness, equality and social justice, and it can also play a role in peacebuilding,” said Hassan.

Another entrant, Hodan Abdullahi Mohamed, a second-year computer science student at Mogadishu University. “I learned a lot from this [competition]. It presented an opportunity to meet fellow artists and it’s been an eye-opener for me,” said Ms. Mohamed, adding, “I use my art to highlight the injustices faced by women and girls.” Cultural attraction The National Museum of Somalia re-opened in July 2020. For close to 30 years prior to that, its doors closed and its many rooms empty.

Established in 1934 by Italian colonial authorities as the ‘Museo della Garesa,’ the cultural institution has endured experiences which few other museums ever have. The building, also known as the ‘Bargash Museum,’ remained the museum’s home until 1985, when its collection, comprising around 3,500 objects, was moved to the newly-built building which has been its home ever since.

However, the violence and chaos of the civil war in the 1990s led to its closure for almost three decades. Federal authorities began essential repairs and rebuilding in 2019, before its re opening three years ago. It has a long way to go to return to its glory days. While damage from the war has been repaired and new foundations and structures are in place, its halls and storage rooms remain exposed and dilapidated, and most of their older content was destroyed or looted during the most recent conflict. Still there are high hopes events like today’s announcement, as well as the related exhibition, are a start.

In his remarks at the event, the Chairperson of the Somali Academy of Science and Arts, Abdulkadir Nor Hussein, noted the valuable role that cultural institutions and expressed the hope that more Somalis would avail themselves of cultural opportunities. “The National Museum is a living book where you can learn your culture, which needs no translation. Just the same way you constantly visit Beerta Nabada (transl.: ‘Peace Gardens’), a tourist attraction, we also recommend you visit the Museum,” he added.

His words were echoed by the National Museum’s Director. “As you can see, all these paintings on the walls were made by these youthful artists and they’ve done an exemplary job – we also urge the Somali people to come to the Museum and view these artistic works in order for them to learn about human rights,” Dr. Amir said. “And we also want to applaud the participants and encourage them – they are al
Series
Category
Geographic Subjects
Creator
UNSOM
Alternate Title
unifeed231101g
Asset ID
3134309