UN / VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN

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03-Oct-2023 00:02:47
Reem Alsalem, Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women and Girls called for reforms to discriminatory national legislation, and also on State to “accede to the UN Conventions on Statelessness to improve the collection of disaggregated data particularly on stateless populations.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / VIOLENCE AGAINST WOMEN
TRT: 2:47
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 03 OCTOBER 2023, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

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FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

03 OCTOBER 2023, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press briefing room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Reem Alsalem, Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women and Girls, its Causes and Consequences:
“I call for the same reforms to discriminatory national legislation. I call on State to accede to the UN Conventions on Statelessness to improve the collection of disaggregated data particularly on stateless populations, to strengthen advocacy campaigns in partnership with religious and community leaders, to provide effective pathways to citizenship for all including of course women, girls, and also minorities and to ensure women's independent right to civil documentation and registration.”
4. Wide shot, press briefing room
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Reem Alsalem, Special Rapporteur on violence against women and girls, its causes and consequences:
“The continued existence of gender discriminatory laws, in my view, is a stark anomaly in the practice of States that claim to be committed to achieving gender equality and also to ending violence against women and girls, because of the myriad of negative human rights consequences that accompany this gender-based discriminatory access to nationality laws, so it results in an avalanche of negative human rights consequences for these women and their families.”
6. Wide shot, press briefing room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Reem Alsalem, Special Rapporteur on violence against women and girls, its causes and consequences:
“Today, almost 50 countries in the world continue to keep nationality laws that have gender discriminatory provisions in their statute books and also 24 countries, women are denied the right to confer nationality on their children on an equal basis with men. And we know that a number of human rights treaties, including regional ones, emphasize the link between nationality and the enjoyment of other human rights, but also emphasize that there shouldn't be this gender-based discrimination.”
8. Wide shot, press briefing room
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Reem Alsalem, Special Rapporteur on violence against women and girls, its causes and consequences:
“The report also explores the reasons behind gender discriminatory nationality laws and statelessness. Both share common root causes such as entrenched patriarchal values, colonial legacies that have influenced the laws of colonized or former colonies. Attempts by government to exert demographic control through nationality laws, we also have long-standing and intersecting forms of discrimination that exist against minorities but also against women in some countries, and also the existence of very problematic administrative bottlenecks with regards to birth, registration, or the acquisition of nationality.”

STORYLINE:

Reem Alsalem, Special Rapporteur on Violence Against Women and Girls called for reforms to discriminatory national legislation, and also on State to “accede to the UN Conventions on Statelessness to improve the collection of disaggregated data particularly on stateless populations.”

The Special Rapporteur today (03 Oct) presented a report on Violence against women and girls, nationality laws and statelessness to the third Committee of the UN General Assembly.

Speaking to reporters, Alsalem said, “the continued existence of gender discriminatory laws, in my view, is a stark anomaly in the practice of States that claim to be committed to achieving gender equality and also to ending violence against women and girls, because of the myriad of negative human rights consequences that accompany this gender-based discriminatory access to nationality laws, so it results in an avalanche of negative human rights consequences for these women and their families.”

She continued, “Today, almost 50 countries in the world continue to keep nationality laws that have gender discriminatory provisions in their statute books and also 24 countries, women are denied the right to confer nationality on their children on an equal basis with men.”

Alsalem also said, “we know that a number of human rights treaties, including regional ones, emphasize the link between nationality and the enjoyment of other human rights, but also emphasize that there shouldn't be this gender-based discrimination.”

In the report, the Special Rapporteur explored the nexus between violence against women and girls, nationality laws and statelessness, with a view to assessing the way in which statelessness and gender-discriminatory nationality laws and practices function as a form of violence against women and girls.

She also offered recommendations to States and other stakeholders on addressing discriminatory nationality laws and practices, including those based on sex and gender discrimination, and mitigating the harmful consequences of statelessness and discriminatory nationality laws and practices for women and girls.

The Special Rapporteurs of the Human Rights Council are independent human rights experts with mandates to report and advise on human rights from a thematic or country-specific perspective.
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