UN / TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS

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01-Aug-2023 00:02:14
During an event commemorating the 10th anniversary of the World Day Against Trafficking in Persons, a UN top official said, "Human trafficking is a crime that hides not just in the shadows but in plain sight." UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / TRAFFICKING IN PERSONS
TRT: 2:14
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 1 AUGUST 2023, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

1 AUGUST 2023, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, meeting room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Antonio M. Lagdameo, Permanent Representative of the Philippines to the UN:
“This event is an opportunity to raise awareness on the challenges of member states, the UN, survivors and all stakeholders facing combating trafficking. With these issues specifically, we wish to emphasize that partnering with victims, survivors and their organizations and learning from their lived experiences are important for effective policymaking and strengthen the implementation of the global plan of action to combat trafficking in persons.”
4. Wide shot, meeting room
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghada Fathi Waly, Executive Director, UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC):
“Human trafficking is a crime that hides not just in the shadows but in plain sight. Yet our responses are falling short, leaving many unprotected. According to data and UNODC’s Global Report on trafficking in persons 2020, to more than 50 percent of cases of human trafficking are brought forward by victims, or their families with authority struggling to detect and protect trafficking victims.”
6. Wide shot, meeting room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Ghada Fathi Waly, Executive Director, UN Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC):
“Those targeted are often the most vulnerable in society, left behind by poverty, conflict and climate-related disasters. In search of a better life, victims become shackled by the false promises of traffickers. Women and girls will account for around 60 percent of detected victims, are more likely to suffer sexual exploitation and higher levels of violence at the hands of their captors, while men and boys are being increasingly exploited for forced labor and criminal activities.”
8. Wide shot, meeting room
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Melanie Thompson, Survivor of human trafficking, Outreach and Advocacy Coordinator, Coalition Against Trafficking in Women:
“And from the perspective of a survivor I can say this, if we combat the demand that continues to exploit women and girls and marginalized people like myself, then we can begin to put an end to human trafficking. That is the only way forward. We must recognize that without the demand for trafficking, there would be no trafficking victims.”
10. Wide shot, meeting room




STORYLINE:
During an event commemorating the 10th anniversary of the World Day Against Trafficking in Persons, a UN top official said, "Human trafficking is a crime that hides not just in the shadows but in plain sight."

The event under the UN-wide theme of “reach every victim of trafficking, leave no one behind” was held today (1 Aug) in New York.

Antonio M. Lagdameo, Permanent Representative of the Philippines to the UN, said, “This event is an opportunity to raise awareness on the challenges of member states, the UN, survivors and all stakeholders facing combating trafficking.”

He continued, “we wish to emphasize that partnering with victims, survivors and their organizations and learning from their lived experiences are important for effective policymaking and strengthen the implementation of the global plan of action to combat trafficking in persons.”

The Executive Director of United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, Ghada Fathi Waly (UNODC), in a video statement, said, “Human trafficking is a crime that hides not just in the shadows but in plain sight. Yet our responses are falling short, leaving many unprotected.”

She added, “According to data and UNODC’s Global Report on trafficking in persons 2020, to more than 50 percent of cases of human trafficking are brought forward by victims, or their families with authority struggling to detect and protect trafficking victims.”

The UNODC’s chief continued, “Those targeted are often the most vulnerable in society, left behind by poverty, conflict and climate-related disasters. In search of a better life, victims become shackled by the false promises of traffickers.”

She noted, “Women and girls will account for around 60 percent of detected victims, are more likely to suffer sexual exploitation and higher levels of violence at the hands of their captors, while men and boys are being increasingly exploited for forced labor and criminal activities.”

Melanie Thompson, Outreach and Advocacy Coordinator at the Coalition Against Trafficking in Women, noted, “And from the perspective of a survivor I can say this, if we combat the demand that continues to exploit women and girls and marginalized people like myself, then we can begin to put an end to human trafficking.”

She stressed, “That is the only way forward.”

Thompson concluded, “We must recognize that without the demand for trafficking, there would be no trafficking victims.”

In the context of trafficking in persons, leaving people behind means failing to end of the exploitation of trafficking victims, failing to support victim-survivors once they are free from their traffickers, and leaving identifiable groups vulnerable to trafficking.

This event was co-organized by the Permanent Missions of the Philippines, Belarus and the Dominican Republic to the United Nations, in collaboration with the UN Office on Drugs and Crime and UN Women.
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