UN / AFGHANISTAN

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21-Jun-2023 00:03:03
The Special Representative of the Secretary-General in Afghanistan, Roza Otunbayeva, said, “The Taliban ask to be recognized by the United Nations and its members, but at the same time, they act against the key values expressed in the United Nations Charter.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / AFGHANISTAN
TRT: 03:03
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 21 JUNE 2023, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

21 JUNE 2023, NEW YORK CITY

2. Med shot, Otunbayeva being seated, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Roza Otunbayeva, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA):
“The April ban specifically targets the United Nations. The Taliban ask to be recognized by the United Nations and its members, but at the same time, they act against the key values expressed in the United Nations Charter.”
4. Med shot, delegates, Security Council
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Roza Otunbayeva, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA):
“We will not put our national female staff in danger, and therefore we are asking them not to report to the office. At the same time, we have asked all our male national staff performing non-essential tasks to stay home to respect the principle of non-discrimination. Finally, we are steadfast: female national staff will not be replaced by male national staff as some de facto authorities have suggested.”
6. Med shot, Otunbayeva, delegates, Security Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Roza Otunbayeva, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA):
“In my regular discussions with the de facto authorities, I am blunt about the obstacles they have created for themselves by the decrees and restrictions they have enacted, in particular against women and girls. We have conveyed to them that as long as these decrees are in place, it is nearly impossible that their government will be recognized by members of the international community.”
8. Med shot, Otunbayeva, delegates, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Roza Otunbayeva, Special Representative of the Secretary-General and Head of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA):
“It is also clear that these decrees are highly unpopular among the Afghan population. They cost the Taliban both domestic and international legitimacy while inflicting suffering on half of their population and damaging their economy.”
10. Med shot, delegates, Security Council
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Naseer Ahmad Faiq, Chargé d'Affaires, Permanent Mission to the United Nations, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan:
“Today, Afghanistan’s women and girls faced with a gender apartheid and gender persecution. They are required to adhere to a strict dress code and are not permitted to travel more than 75 km without a male guardian. The Taliban is systemically violating the rights of women and young girls while regressing with time and resorting to using draconian, cruel, and inhumane practices.”
12. Med shot, delegates, Security Council
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Naseer Ahmad Faiq, Chargé d'Affaires, Permanent Mission to the United Nations, Islamic Republic of Afghanistan:
“We hope to see the international community, and this Council in particular, act with unity and consensus to prevent Afghanistan from turning into a terrorist hub and to ensure a comprehensive settlement that leads to the formation of a broad-based legitimate political structure and system.”
14. Med shot, delegates, Security Council

STORYLINE:
The Special Representative of the Secretary-General in Afghanistan, Roza Otunbayeva, said, “The Taliban ask to be recognized by the United Nations and its members, but at the same time, they act against the key values expressed in the United Nations Charter.”

Addressing the Security Council today (21 Jun), the head of the United Nations Assistance Mission in Afghanistan (UNAMA) said, “We will not put our national female staff in danger, and therefore we are asking them not to report to the office. At the same time, we have asked all our male national staff performing non-essential tasks to stay home to respect the principle of non-discrimination.”

She stressed, “We are steadfast: female national staff will not be replaced by male national staff as some de facto authorities have suggested.”

The April restrictions against Afghan women working for the United Nations (UN) place a question mark over the UN activities across the country.

Otunbayeva also noted that the de facto authorities had given no explanations for this ban or assurances that it would be lifted.

The ban against Afghan women working for the UN adds to earlier restrictions placed on Afghan women and girls by the de facto authorities: against women working for non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and for other diplomatic entities; preventing girls from attending non-religious secondary and tertiary education institutions; against girls and women visiting public parks, baths, and gyms.

These and other edicts limit women and girls’ physical movement and participation in economic, social, and public life.

Otunbayeva said, “In my regular discussions with the de facto authorities, I am blunt about the obstacles they have created for themselves by the decrees and restrictions they have enacted, in particular against women and girls. We have conveyed to them that as long as these decrees are in place, it is nearly impossible that their government will be recognized by members of the international community.”

She added, “It is also clear that these decrees are highly unpopular among the Afghan population. They cost the Taliban both domestic and international legitimacy while inflicting suffering on half of their population and damaging their economy.”

The Special Representative also said that despite the problems, the UN had established reliable working channels of communication with the de facto authorities and identified greater opportunities for cooperation that could build mutual understanding and improve the Afghan people’s lives.

However, she concluded by saying that much more could be done if the Taliban rescinded its punishing restrictions on its female population.

Representing his country, Naseer Ahmad Faiq, Chargé d'Affaires of the Permanent Mission of the Islamic Republic of Afghanistan to the United Nations, stated, “Today, Afghanistan’s women and girls faced with a gender apartheid and gender persecution. They are required to adhere to a strict dress code and are not permitted to travel more than 75 km without a male guardian. The Taliban is systemically violating the rights of women and young girls while regressing with time and resorting to using draconian, cruel, and inhumane practices.”

He concluded, “We hope to see the international community, and this Council in particular, act with unity and consensus to prevent Afghanistan from turning into a terrorist hub and to ensure a comprehensive settlement that leads to the formation of a broad-based legitimate political structure and system.”
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