SOUTH SUDAN / MUNDARI PEACE DEAL

Preview Language:   Original
28-Apr-2023 00:05:08
In recent months, intercommunal violence and attacks by community-based militias have resulted in increasing civilian casualties across South Sudan. UNMISS

Available Languages: Arabic, English
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
Six Official
Other Formats
Description
STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / MUNDARI PEACE DEAL
TRT: 05:08
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / ARABIC / MUNDARI / NATS

DATELINE: 13 MARCH 2023, TIJOR, SOUTH SUDAN

SHOTLIST:

1. Various shots, community
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Victor Fasawa, Team Leader, Civil Affairs, Central Equatoria UNMISS:
“We ask the youth to be civil. If there are grievances, you should take it up in the right channel. Go to the chiefs, go to the elders, and have it discussed. If it's not resolved at the level of the community.
3. Wide shot, community
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Victor Fasawa, Team Leader, Civil Affairs, Central Equatoria UNMISS:
“They can raise it to the level of the county, so that legal redress is made.”
5. Wide shot, community
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Victor Fasawa, Team Leader, Civil Affairs, Central Equatoria UNMISS:
“Every inch of the land in South Sudan, those little islands of peace can go together and produce bigger peace at the national level.”
7. Various shots, women
8. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Rhoda Kila, Traditional Leader, Tijor, Central Equatoria:
“The UN should provide tents, axes, and many other farming tools, because most houses have been burnt to the ground, including our grain [stores].
9. Wide shot, participants
10. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Rhoda Kila, Traditional Leader, Tijor, Central Equatoria:
“We are used to getting our grain from the granary, going to our garden [or farm] to get our food and eat. Now everything is destroyed.”
11. Various shots, leaders sitting
12. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Joseph Lomoro, Community Elder, Tijor, Central Equatoria:
“It has started raining. Where will [people] go because most houses are all burnt. Let the youth sit and think. Fighting has no benefit. If they have any problem, they should come to the elders so that we solve it.”
13. Various shots, community
14. SOUNDBITE (Mundari) Yoani Jaja Yosepo, Youth Representative, Tijor, Central Equatoria:
“My message to the youth and the rest of our community members whose houses got burnt and their loved ones died during the conflict is that, let us forgive each other and forget the past, so that we return to our previous lifestyle of staying peacefully with each other. When we stay in peace and love one another, we shall still get everything that we lost during the conflict, so let us stay in peace after this very sitting of reconciliatory dialogue and peaceful coexistence.”
15. Various shots, people signing and greeting


STORYLINE:
In recent months, intercommunal violence and attacks by community-based militias have resulted in increasing civilian casualties across South Sudan. Cattle raiding and revenge killings, as well as increased resource competition between herding and farming communities, have triggered violent clashes. Many people have been displaced and women, especially, are at risk of sexual violence.

SOUNDBITE (English) Victor Fasawa, Team Leader, Civil Affairs, Central Equatoria UNMISS:
“We ask the youth to be civil. If there are grievances, you should take it up in the right channel. Go to the chiefs, go to the elders, and have it discussed. If it's not resolved at the level of the community, they can raise it to the level of the county, so that legal redress is made. Every inch of the land in South Sudan, those little islands of peace can go together and produce bigger peace at the national level.”
The dry season has been characterized by increased violence and atrocities, including clashes between the Mundari and Bari community, intercommunal violence in northern Warrap, and ongoing cattle raids and migration-related conflicts in the Equatoria.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Rhoda Kila, Traditional Leader, Tijor, Central Equatoria:
“The UN should provide tents, axes, and many other farming tools, because most houses have been burnt to the ground, including our grain [stores]. We are used to getting our grain from the granary, going to our garden [or farm] to get our food and eat. Now everything is destroyed.”

The influx of small arms and light weapons and ammunition in the hands of civilians and youth groups has also contributed to frequent escalations of violence.

SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Joseph Lomoro, Community Elder, Tijor, Central Equatoria:
“It has started raining. Where will [people] go because most houses are all burnt. Let the youth sit and think. Fighting has no benefit. If they have any problem, they should come to the elders so that we solve it.”

Despite positive steps regarding political and security arrangements, progress on key human rights issues has been limited and justice remains largely elusive for survivors of violent atrocities in South Sudan. Neither the government nor opposition groups have held perpetrators within their own ranks accountable.

SOUNDBITE (Mundari) Yoani Jaja Yosepo, Youth Representative, Tijor, Central Equatoria:
“My message to the youth and the rest of our community members whose houses got burnt and their loved ones died during the conflict is that, let us forgive each other and forget the past, so that we return to our previous lifestyle of staying peacefully with each other. When we stay in peace and love one another, we shall still get everything that we lost during the conflict, so let us stay in peace after this very sitting of reconciliatory dialogue and peaceful coexistence.”

The South Sudanese government claims that the high levels of violence that continue to destroy civilians' lives is all “inter-communal violence. A pervasive culture of impunity continues to fuel resentment, recurring cycles of armed violence and mass atrocities in South Sudan.
Series
Category
Topical Subjects
Geographic Subjects
Creator
UNMISS
Alternate Title
unifeed230428b
Asset ID
3040537