GENEVA / WMO GLOBAL CLIMATE

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21-Apr-2023 00:03:27
Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General of the World Meteorological Organization, said that negative trends in weather patterns may continue until the 2060s “independently of our success in climate mitigation.” UNTV CH

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STORY: GENEVA / WMO GLOBAL CLIMATE
TRT: 03:23
SOURCE: UNTV CH
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 21 APRIL 2023, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot, exterior, flag alley, Palais des Nations
2. Wide shot, speakers at podium, conference room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organization (WMO):
“We have again broken a new record in ocean heat; heat content which is, for example, giving more energy for tropical storms, cyclones, hurricanes, and typhoons.”
4. Med shot, cameramen, tripods, equipment
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organization (WMO):
“We have doubled the sea level rise during the past 20 years. We used to have a 2.3 mm per year sea level rise twenty years ago, and now we have seen an increase of 4.6mm per year. That increase is very much coming from the melting of major glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica.”
6. Wide shot, speakers, monitor
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organization (WMO):
“Unfortunately, these negative trends in weather patterns and all of these parameters may continue until 2060, independent of our success in climate mitigation. We have already emitted so much, especially carbon dioxide, into the atmosphere that this phasing out of negative trends will take several decades. As I said, we have already lost this 'melting of glaciers' game and 'sea level rise' game.”
8. Wide shot, journalists, monitors, speakers, UN logo
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organization (WMO):
“Melting of the glaciers continues, and there has been a four-time increase of the melting of glaciers since the 1970s, and here in Switzerland, we lost 6.2 percent of the glacier mass last summer because of the heatwave, which is a new record.”
10. Closeup, video camera viewfinder, speakers
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organization (WMO):
"Last summer, the heatwave here in Europe led to casualties of about 15,000 people- who died because of the heat wave and poor air quality. In China, last summer was the hottest summer ever, and it was also the second driest summer that they have observed. They also reached record-low levels of water in their main river called Yangtze.”
12. Wide shot, journalists
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organization (WMO):
“We have started seeing the increase of food insecurity again. There have been more than 20 million people affected in the horn of Africa, 28 million in Latin America and the Caribbean, 19 million in Afghanistan, and 7 million in South Sudan.”
14. Close up, journalist, podium, speakers
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General, World Meteorological Organization (WMO):
“The governments have realized that there is a problem called climate change, and they can see it with their own eyes. The proof of scientific facts is now very clear. What has also been happening during the past few years is that the private sector has started acting. So, a growing number of companies worldwide are interested in climate mitigation and being part of the solution.”
16. Wide shot, cameraperson filming speakers
17. Med shot, journalists
18. Med shot, photographer, camera, monitor

STORYLINE:
Petteri Taalas, Secretary-General of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO), said that negative trends in weather patterns may continue until the 2060s “independently of our success in climate mitigation.”

Droughts, floods, and heatwaves affected communities on every continent and cost many billions of dollars as climate change continued its advance in 2022.

This is one of the key findings of the annual flagship report “State of the Global Climate,” launched today (21 Apr) by WMO at the United Nations in Geneva.

WMO Secretary-General said, “We have again broken a new record in ocean heat, heat content which is, for example, giving more energy for tropical storms, cyclones, hurricanes, and typhoons.”

The “State of the Global Climate 2022” report is released before Earth Day on 22 April.

It reports on climate change indicators such as temperature, ocean heat and acidification, sea level rise, sea ice, glaciers, and extreme weather.

“We have doubled the sea level rise during the past 20 years”, reported WMO’s Taalas.

“We used to have a 2.3 mm per year sea level rise twenty years ago, and now we have seen an increase of 4.6mm per year. That increase is very much coming from the melting of major glaciers in Greenland and Antarctica.”

The European Alps smashed records for glacier melt due to a combination of little winter snow, an intrusion of Sahara dust in March 2022, and heatwaves between May and early September.

“Melting of the glaciers continues, and there has been a four-time increase of the melting of glaciers since the 1970s, and here in Switzerland, we lost 6.2 percent of the glacier mass last summer because of the heatwave, which is a new record,” Taalas said.

WMO’s new figures show that global temperatures have continued to rise, making 2015 to 2022 the eighth warmest ever since regular tracking started in 1850 despite three consecutive years of a cooling La Niña climate pattern.

Furthermore, WMO says concentrations of the three main greenhouse gases, which trap heat in the atmosphere – carbon dioxide, methane, and nitrous oxide – reached record highs in 2021, which is the latest year for which consolidated data is available, and that there are indications of a continued increase in 2022.

WMO’s Secretary-General said, “We have already emitted so much, especially carbon dioxide, into the atmosphere that this phasing out of negative trends will take several decades. As I said, we have already lost this 'melting of glaciers' game and 'sea level rise' game.”

According to WMO's Secretary-General, heatwaves in China and Europe affected tens of millions, drove food insecurity, boosted mass migration, and cost billions of dollars in loss and damage.

Taalas said, "Last summer, the heatwave here in Europe led to casualties of about 15,000 people who died because of the heat wave and poor air quality.”

He also said, “In China, last summer was the hottest summer ever, and it was also the second driest summer that they have observed. They also reached record-low levels of water in their main river called Yangtze.”

In addition to climate indicators, the report focuses on impacts.

Throughout the year, hazardous climate and weather-related events drove new population displacement and worsened conditions for many of the 95 million people already living in displacement at the beginning of the year, according to the report.

Taalas stressed, “We have started seeing the increase of food insecurity again.”

“There have been more than 20 million people affected in the Horn of Africa, 28 million in Latin America and the Caribbean, 19 million in Afghanistan, and 7 million in South Sudan.”

In Somalia, almost 1,2 million people became internally displaced by the catastrophic impacts of drought on pastoral and farming livelihood and hunger during the year.

Record-breaking rainfall in Pakistan in July and August last year killed over 1,700 people, while some 33 million were affected.

The report also puts a spotlight on ecosystems and the environment and shows how climate change is affecting recurring events in nature, such as when trees blossom or birds migrate.

On a positive note, Taalas emphasized that “governments have realized that there is a problem called climate change, and they can see it with their own eyes.”

He added that “the proof of scientific facts is now very clear. What has also been happening during the past few years is that the private sector has started acting. So, a growing number of companies worldwide are interested in climate mitigation and being part of the solution.”

The report points out that today, improved technology makes the transition to renewable energy cheaper and more accessible than ever.

Dozens of experts contributed to the report, including National Meteorological and Hydrological Services (NMHSs) and Global Data and Analysis Centers, as well as Regional Climate Centres, the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP), the Global Atmosphere Watch (GAW), the Global Cryosphere Watch and Copernicus Climate Change Service operated by ECMWF.

UN partners such as the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the Intergovernmental Oceanographic Commission of UNESCO (UNESCO-IOC), the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the UN Office for Disaster Risk Reduction (UNDRR) and the World Food Programme (WFP) also provided input to the report.
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