WHO / COVID-19 INFLUENZA VACCINATIONS

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01-Dec-2022 00:05:22
Influenza season epidemic is off to an early start in WHO’s European region amid concerns over RSV and COVID-19. WHO

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STORY: WHO / COVID-19 INFLUENZA VACCINATIONS
TRT: 05:22
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT WHO ON SCREEN
LANGAUGE: ENGLISH / GEORGIAN / DANISH / NATS

DATELINE: SEE SHOTLIST

SHOTLIST:

12 OCTOBER 2022, TBILISI, GEORGIA

1. Wide shot, Zurab Zurabashvili walking down a staircase
2. Wide shot, Zurab Zurabashvili leave his office at the Centre for Mental Health and Prevention of Addiction
3. SOUNBITE (Georgian) Zurab Zurabashvili, Psychiatrist at the Centre for Mental Health and Prevention of Addiction:
“There is a saying in Georgian “I love you so much, I could die for you.” I say, “Don’t die, just get vaccinated for me, so I don’t fall ill because of you and this will be a proof of love.”
4. Wide shot, Zurab Zurabashvili leaving his office and walking in the parking lot

13 OCTOBER 2022, TBILISI, GEORGIA

5. Wide shot, street scene
6. Med shot, street scene
7. Wide shot, exterior of Infectious Diseases, AIDS and Clinical Immunology Research Centre
8. SOUNDBITE (Georgian) Lela Beradze, Chief Nurse of the Emergency Unit at Botchorishvili Clinic in Tbilisi, Georgia:
“It is extremely important to administer the flu vaccine in October or November for it to be effective.”
9. Wide shot, Lela Beradze prepares influenza vaccination for a health worker
10. Close up, Lela Beradze prepares influenza vaccination for a health worker
11. Med shot, Lela Beradze administers the influenza vaccine to a health worker
12. Close up, Lela Beradze applies pressure to the health worker’s injection site on upper arm after vaccination
13. Wide shot, Lela Beradze applies a plaster to influenza vaccination injection site on upper arm
14. Close up, bandaid covers influenza vaccination injection site on upper arm
15. SOUNDBITE (Georgian) Lela Beradze, Chief Nurse of the Emergency Unit at Botchorishvili Clinic:
“Getting vaccinated does not only mean protecting yourself. It means protecting those around you. It means protecting young kids and older people. It also means protecting those who due to underlying health conditions cannot get vaccinated.”
16. Close up, Lela Beradze washes her hands
17. Wide shot, Lela Beradze turns off the water and dries her hands

25 OCTOBER 2022, COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

18. Wide shot, clients waiting to be vaccinated at Baldersgade Vaccination Centre
19. Med shot, influenza vaccinations being prepped
20. Wide shot, nurse carrying prepared vaccinations
21. SOUNDBITE (DANISH) Tina Barsøe, Director of Baldersgade Vaccination Centre:
“It is a bit worrying because when we had the big COVID-19 wave, cases of influenza were low, and so the concern right now is if we see a rise in both COVID-19 and influenza, then it's a very bad combination, especially for vulnerable groups.”
22. Close up, COVID-19 vaccination
23. Close up, COVID-19 vaccination
24. Med shot, vaccinator talking with client
25. Close up, client is vaccinated
26. Close up, client receives a Bandaid after vaccination

15 NOVEMBER 2022, COPENHAGEN, DENMARK

27. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Richard Pebody, Head of the High Threat Pathogen Team, WHO/Europe:
“We do need to be very conscious that we are moving now into the flu season. Looking at what's already happened in the southern hemisphere, they've obviously come out of their winter season now they saw an early and quite intense influenza season. And that's after a period where we've seen very little flu circulating since the beginning of the pandemic.”
28. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Richard Pebody, Head of the High Threat Pathogen Team, WHO/Europe:
“It's important to remember that vaccines save lives. And it's really important that if people are in these eligible groups, that they take up their offers of vaccine, get themselves vaccinated, protect themselves. But also importantly, for all of us, that we remember with these respiratory infections, there's other things we can do as well that if we wash our hands, catch our coughs, or sneezes, and also stay out of circulation, if we're unwell, that can also help reduce the risk of infections.”

STORYLINE:

Influenza season epidemic is off to an early start in WHO’s European region amid concerns over RSV and COVID-19.

An increasing number of people is being admitted to hospitals due to influenza, with hospital admissions rising since October. Our populations, 55 years and older, account for almost half of reported influenza hospital admissions.

In 23 countries reporting Severe Acute Respiratory Infection (SARI) data, hospitalised patients have been diagnosed mostly with type B viruses (85%), with children aged four years and younger being the most often affected.

RSV has also been on the rise since October, with some 20 countries and areas experiencing intensified RSV activity.

COVID-19 case rates, hospital and intensive care unit (ICU) admissions, and death rates are currently low compared to the past 12 months, but this situation could change as new variants emerge, and the disease continues to strain healthcare resources.

With the continued impact of the COVID-19 pandemic and the circulation and health impact of other respiratory pathogens, it is challenging to predict how the new winter period will develop.

WHO/Europe is concerned about this early start of the influenza season as when flu, COVID-19 and other respiratory illnesses such as Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) co-circulate, the health of vulnerable people is at greater risk.

People across the region, especially from at-risk groups – older people, health workers, pregnant women, people with underlying health conditions – are turning to vaccination as one form of protection.

Zurab Zurabashvili, Psychiatrist at the Centre for Mental Health and Prevention of Addiction, in Tbilisi, Georgia, was one of the first health workers in his country to be vaccinated against COVID-19. “There is a saying in Georgian ‘I love you so much, I could die for you.’ I say, “Don’t die, just get vaccinated for me, so I don’t fall ill because of you and this will be a proof of love.”

Health workers are some of the most vulnerable when it comes to the risk of catching viruses. They are also a key, trusted source of information for their patients. If they are positive about vaccination, their patients might be more likely to get vaccinated too.

Lela Beradze, Chief Nurse of the Emergency Unit at Botchorishvili Clinic in Tbilisi, Georgia, urges that vaccination for influenza should be done in October or November for best protection from the virus.

“Getting vaccinated does not only mean protecting yourself. It means protecting those around you. It means protecting young kids and older people. It also means protecting those who due to underlying health conditions cannot get vaccinated,” Beradze says.

At Baldersgade Vaccination Centre in Copenhagen, Denmark, vaccinations for both COVID-19 and influenza are underway.

Tina Barsøe, Director of Baldersgade Vaccination Centre, says, “It is a bit worrying because when we had the big COVID-19 wave, cases of influenza were low, and so, the concern right now is if we see a rise in both COVID-19 and influenza, then it's a very bad combination, especially for vulnerable groups.”

Several clients at the centre opted to be vaccinated for both COVID-19 and the influenza. WHO/Europe urges everyone who is eligible to get vaccinated against both influenza and COVID-19.

Dr Richard Pebody, Head of the High Threat Pathogen Team at WHO/Europe says, “It's important to remember that vaccines save lives. And it's really important that if people are in these eligible groups, that they take up their offers of vaccine, get themselves vaccinated, protect themselves.”

Dr Pebody urges the taking of other protective measures as well, such as hand washing, catching our coughs and sneezes and staying away from other people when unwell with respiratory diseases.

By taking precautions, we can all contribute to a healthier winter season for all.
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