UN / YEMEN

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22-Nov-2022 00:03:50
Hans Grundberg, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen, said, “I want the parties to the conflict to not only renew the truce but crucially to commit to taking steps towards a comprehensive resolution of the conflict.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / YEMEN
TRT: 3:50
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / ARABIC / NATS

DATELINE: 22 NOVEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY / RECENT

SHOTLIST:

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations

22 NOVEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Hans Grundberg, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen:
“Addressing urgent humanitarian and economic issues is needed in the immediate term to avoid the situation for civilians to deteriorate further, but more durable solutions can only be reached in the context of a comprehensive settlement of the conflict. Many of the economic issues being discussed, such as the issue of revenue management for the payment of salaries, require cooperation between the parties in order to be sustainable.”
4. Wide shot, Security Council
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Hans Grundberg, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen:
“This is why I want the parties to the conflict to not only renew the truce but crucially to commit to taking steps towards a comprehensive resolution of the conflict. A political process under UN auspices will be needed to reach such a resolution, and the sooner we can start that work in earnest, the greater our chances of reversing the devastating trends of this war.”
6. Wide shot, Security Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Reena Ghelani, Director for Operations and Advocacy, United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“Many of the truce’s provisions continue to hold despite its expiration on 2 October. This is providing a continued and much-needed reprieve for the people of Yemen. However, the humanitarian dividends of the truce need more than six months to take hold, and the people affected by this conflict need a sustained guarantee of peace before they decide to return home to rebuild their lives for some after having been displaced multiple times. They also need to see improvements in their everyday lives beyond reductions in fighting.”
8. Wide shot, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Reena Ghelani, Director for Operations and Advocacy, United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“Localized clashes continue to impact civilians in some parts of the country. We remain concerned by the possibility that large-scale hostilities may again resurge in Yemen.”
10. Med shot, delegates
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Reena Ghelani, Director for Operations and Advocacy, United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“Migrants and refugees also experience significant dangers. So far this year, more than 50,000 migrants have taken the sea route from the Horn of Africa to Yemen in search of a better life. Just last month, another migrant raft sank, leaving three people dead and 28 others missing. Hunger continues to haunt more than half the population in Yemen, preying on the most vulnerable.”
12. Med shot, delegates
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Reena Ghelani, Director for Operations and Advocacy, United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“The number of people facing acute food insecurity between October and December is slightly lower than our initial projections in early 2022. This is very good news. But it does not eclipse the fact that 17 million people still do not know where they will get their next meal.”
14. Med shot, delegates
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Reena Ghelani, Director for Operations and Advocacy, United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA):
“Humanitarian access is still largely constrained by bureaucratic impediments, movement restrictions, and unacceptable levels of interference.”
16. Med shot, delegates
17. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Abdullah al-Saadi, Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Yemen:
“Economic, financial, and administrative reform programs are underway to strengthen the governance activities and also facilitate and accelerate these reforms to ensure that these have a positive impact on the economy and on the government's efforts to according to our different priorities to meet our citizens’ needs.”
18. Med shot, delegates

STORYLINE:
Hans Grundberg, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen, said, “I want the parties to the conflict to not only renew the truce but crucially to commit to taking steps towards a comprehensive resolution of the conflict.”

Addressing the Security Council today (22 Nov), the Special Envoy provided an overview of the situation in Yemen following the formal expiration of the truce on 2 October and briefed on the current mediation efforts and the way forward.

Grundberg stated that addressing urgent humanitarian and economic issues is needed in the immediate term to avoid the situation for civilians to deteriorate further, but more durable solutions can only be reached in the context of a comprehensive settlement of the conflict.

According to Grundberg, many of the economic issues being discussed, such as the issue of revenue management for the payment of salaries, require cooperation between the parties to be sustainable.

Also briefing the Security Council today, Reena Ghelani, Director for Operations and Advocacy of the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA), said that while civilian casualty levels have not substantially increased since the truce’s expiration, localized clashes continue to impact civilians in some parts of the country.

She added, “We remain concerned by the possibility that large-scale hostilities may again resurge in Yemen.”

According to Ghelani, in the last week of October, according to verified figures, shelling and sniper fire killed two civilians and wounded eight more – many of them children – in Ta’iz.

Earlier this month, in Ma’rib, four displaced civilians were killed, and at least five more were injured when a weapons storage facility exploded due to fighting.

Vulnerable groups bear some of the heaviest costs of the clashes.

She also said that according to open-source reporting, child casualties surged by 43 percent between September and October.

Landmines and unexploded ordnance continue to account for the largest share of civilian casualties.

Ghelani explained that the reduction in fighting since April has allowed civilians to move more freely, but this has increased their exposure to landmines and unexploded ordnance, killing and injuring more than 164 civilians, including 74 children, between July and September.

She added, “Migrants and refugees also experience significant dangers. So far this year, more than 50,000 migrants have taken the perilous sea route from the Horn of Africa to Yemen in search of a better life. Just last month, another migrant raft sank, leaving three people dead and 28 others missing.”

Hunger continues to haunt more than half the population in Yemen, preying on the most vulnerable.

Ghelani said, “The number of people facing acute food insecurity between October and December is slightly lower than our initial projections in early 2022. This is very good news. But it does not eclipse the fact that 17 million people still do not know where they will get their next meal.”

In this context, she welcomed the arrival of a shipment carrying 14,000 metric tons of wheat flour under the Black Sea Grain Initiative on 15 October and three further grain shipments that left Ukraine on 23 October, 13, and 17 November.

The humanitarian operating environment is becoming more difficult every month, according to Ghelani.

She said, “Humanitarian access is still largely constrained by bureaucratic impediments, movement restrictions, and unacceptable levels of interference.”

Over 70 percent, or nearly 500 out of 673 reported access incidents between July and September, were due to bureaucratic impediments - the vast majority of these occurring in Houthi-controlled areas.

A deteriorating security situation is also leaving humanitarians increasingly exposed to carjackings, kidnappings, and other incidents.

More than 30 carjacking incidents have occurred in Government-held areas this year.

Five UN staff are still missing after being abducted in February in Abyan.

Two additional UN staff in Sana’a remain detained after more than a year.

Ghelani called for all staff to be released immediately and reminded all parties to the conflict that they must, under international humanitarian law, facilitate the rapid and unimpeded passage of humanitarian relief for civilians in need and respect and protect humanitarian staff and assets.

Yemeni Ambassador Abdullah al-Saadi also spoke at the Council meeting.

He said, “Economic, financial, and administrative reform programs are underway to strengthen the governance activities and also facilitate and accelerate these reforms to ensure that these have a positive impact on the economy and on the government's efforts according to our different priorities to meet our citizens’ needs.”
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