UN / WORLD TOILET DAY

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17-Nov-2022 00:03:11
Ahead of World Toilet Day, Johannes Cullmann, Vice Chair of UN-Water, said to reporters today, “We are just polluting our own resources if we don't have adequate wastewater treatment.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / WORLD TOILET DAY
TRT: 03:11
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 17 NOVEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UN Headquarters

17 NOVEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, speakers at dais, press room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Johannes Cullmann, Vice Chair, UN-Water:
“Just this week, the media has reported that we have by now 8 billion people on the planet. And of these 8 billion people, almost half lack access to safe sanitation, so they have inadequate toilets, no wastewater treatment, or no toilets at all. And that is pretty much a scandal if we think that we are beyond the year 2000.”
4. Wide shot, speakers at dais, press room
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Johannes Cullmann, Vice Chair, UN-Water:
“We need to be smart about sanitation. We need to think how we can organize sanitation so that it is safe for most, for women, and for children, that it is climate-smart. And that it can be climate-smart, it has been proven because there are solutions where we can actually recycle energy that is in the sanitation system, both through heat, but also through the carbon, of course, that is inherent to the waste. So, the human waste is also a resource that we're now just putting into our seas or rivers, and that is really not where we want to be.”
6. Wide shot, speakers at dais, press room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Johannes Cullmann, Vice Chair, UN-Water:
“We are just polluting our own resources if we don't have adequate wastewater treatment.”
8. Wide shot, speakers at dais, press room
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Johannes Cullmann, Vice Chair, UN-Water:
“Groundwater is 30 percent of our available water resource, freshwater resource on the earth. It sits in the ground; it’s invisible. And the problem with sanitation is also the invisible problem because it's not here in the UN or in our nice homes. That problem about sanitation is where the people are poor and where media don't go. So, the sanitation problem is largely an invisible problem that we have to resolve.”
10. Wide shot, speakers at dais, press room
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Johannes Cullmann, Vice Chair, UN-Water:
“Sanitation and the fair treatment of women and children is not a technological problem. It's a political will problem. So, we need the media, and we need politicians to finally make that investment. We can throw billions at wars or billions at pandemics, but we can't ensure that women and children have safe sanitation. That shouldn't be the case.”
12. Wide shot, speakers at dais, press room
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Ann Thomas, Team Leader, Sanitation and Hygiene, WASH Programme Division, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF):
“SDG 6.2 is about ending open defecation and providing access to safe sanitation and hygiene. And it is the furthest off track of all the SDGs and the furthest in terms of underfunding.”
14. Wide shot, journalists, press room
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Ann Thomas, Team Leader, Sanitation and Hygiene, WASH Programme Division, United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF):
“And this is a crisis because it has a profound impact on public health, economic productivity, environmental integrity, educational outcomes, especially for girls and women who are disproportionately affected by deplorable sanitation conditions in schools, health care facilities, and in their homes.”
16. Wide shot, journalists, press room

STORYLINE:
Ahead of World Toilet Day, Johannes Cullmann, Vice Chair of UN-Water, said to reporters today (17 Nov), “We are just polluting our own resources if we don't have adequate wastewater treatment.”

World Toilet Day 2022 focuses on the impact of the sanitation crisis on groundwater.

The central message of World Toilet Day 2022 is that safely managed sanitation protects groundwater from human waste pollution.

Cullmann said, “We need to be smart about sanitation. We need to think how we can organize sanitation so that it is safe for most for women and for children, that it is climate-smart. And that it can be climate-smart, it has been proven because there are solutions where we can actually recycle energy that is in the sanitation system, both through heat, but also through the carbon, of course, that is inherent to the waste. So, the human waste is also a resource that we're now just putting into our seas or rivers, and that is really not where we want to be.”

World Toilet Day, held annually since 2013 on 19 November, celebrates toilets and raises awareness of the 3.6 billion people living without access to safely managed sanitation.

Cullmann noted, “Just this week, the media has reported that we have by now 8 billion people on the planet. And of these 8 billion people, almost half lack access to safe sanitation, so they have inadequate toilets, no wastewater treatment, or no toilets at all. And that is pretty much a scandal if we think that we are beyond the year 2000.”

The 2022 campaign ‘Making the invisible visible’ explores how inadequate sanitation systems spread human waste into rivers, lakes, and soil, polluting underground water resources.

Cullmann said, “Groundwater is 30 percent of our available water resource, freshwater resource on the earth. It sits in the ground; it’s invisible. And the problem with sanitation is also the invisible problem because it's not here in the UN or in our nice homes. That problem about sanitation is where the people are poor and where media don't go. So, the sanitation problem is largely an invisible problem that we have to resolve.”

Currently, the world is seriously off track to meet the promise of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) 6.2: to ensure safe toilets for all by 2030.

Ann Thomas, UNICEF Team Leader of the Sanitation and Hygiene, WASH Programme Division, emphasized, “SDG 6.2 is about ending open defecation and providing access to safe sanitation and hygiene. And it is the furthest off track of all the SDGs and the furthest in terms of underfunding.”

Thomas explained, “this is a crisis because it has a profound impact on public health, economic productivity, environmental integrity, educational outcomes, especially for girls and women who are disproportionately affected by deplorable sanitation conditions in schools, health care facilities, and in their homes.”

The campaign urges governments to work on average four times faster to ensure SDG 6.2 is achieved on time.

Policymakers are also called upon to fully recognize the connection between sanitation and groundwater in their plans to safeguard this vital water resource.

Cullmann stated, “Sanitation and the fair treatment of women and children is not a technological problem. It's a political will problem. So, we need the media, and we need politicians to finally make that investment. We can throw billions at wars or billions at pandemics, but we can't ensure that women and children have safe sanitation. That shouldn't be the case.”
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