SHARM EL SHEIKH / COP27 CLIMATE SCIENCE

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10-Nov-2022 00:03:36
At a COP27 event on climate science, UNFCCC Executive Secretary Simon Stiell said, “science provides the evident and data on the impact of climate change, but it also gives us the tools and knowledge as how we need to address it.” UNIFEED

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STORY: SHARM EL SHEIKH / COP27 CLIMATE SCIENCE
TRT: 03:36
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGAUGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 10 NOVEMBER 2022, SHARM EL SHEIKH, EGYPT

SHOTLIST:

1. Various shots, exterior, COP27 venue
2. Wide shot, press conference room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Simon Stiell, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC):
“Science is at the heart of everything we do, amongst the thousands of people here, all from different parts of the world, science is our common language, it is the foundational elements that formed this process and the one that needs to be counted on. Science provides the evident and data on the impact of climate change, but it also gives us the tools and knowledge as how we need to address it.”
4. Wide shot, press conference room
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Simon Stiell, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC):
“The adaptation alone cannot keep up with the impact of climate change, which is already far worse than originally predicted. Don’t get me wrong, adaptation actions are still crucial and critical to upgrade small-scaled, fragmented and reactive efforts. But as your report says, the potential to adapt climate change is not limitless. And they were not preventing all losses and damage that we have seen.”
6. Wide shot, press conference room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Simon Stiell, Executive Secretary of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC):
“As your first insight says, adaptation actions cannot substitute for ambitious mitigation. Adaptation and mitigation actions exist in an inverse relationship. The less we mitigate, the more we have to adapt. So, investing in mitigation is a way to reducing the needs to invest in adaption and resilience.”
7. Wide shot, press conference room
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Johan Rockstrom, Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research:
“1.6 billion people already today live in ‘vulnerability hotspots’, a number that will double in 2050 if we continue burning fossil fuels as today. Dear friends, that is one third of the earth’s population living in regions that are approaching limitation of adaptation and being at risk of social instability.”
9. Wide shot, press conference room
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Lisa Schipper, University of Oxford:
“Adaptation also needs to be improved of the current way of doing it. We need to rethink a little bit how we're approaching adaptation and particularly, that we need to consider that vulnerability is a key factor in understanding how to plan adaptation. And this links with the inclusive decision making for climate resilient development that is mentioned in the Insight 9. We have to think about vulnerability, it offers us a chance to think more inclusively and that means bringing in marginalized groups in the decision-making process, so that we can actually ensure that we don't end up with higher vulnerability and maladaptation.”
11. Wide shot, press conference room
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Kristie L. Ebi, Co-chair, Future Earth Governing Council:
“The major challenge in the health sector is the lack of investment. Under the UNFCCC adaptation funds, less than half of one percent goes to health. We are not going to achieve the goals that we would like to achieve without ensuring that we have the investment in adaptation, mitigation and resilience.”
13. Wide shot, press conference room

STORYLINE:

At a COP27 event on climate science, UNFCCC Executive Secretary Simon Stiell said, “science provides the evident and data on the impact of climate change, but it also gives us the tools and knowledge as how we need to address it.”

Today (10 Nov) in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt, global experts from the natural and social sciences launched Ten Essential Insights on Climate Change.

The report presents key insights from the latest climate change-related research this year and responds to clear calls for policy guidance during this climate-critical decade. The authors emphasize and unpack the complex interactions between climate change and other drivers of risk, such as conflicts, pandemics, food crises and underlying development challenges in the report.

Speaking to reporters, UNFCCC Executive Secretary Simon Stiell said, “science is at the heart of everything we do, amongst the thousands of people here, all from different parts of the world, science is our common language, it is the foundational elements that formed this process and the one that needs to be counted on.”

“Adaptation alone cannot keep up with the impact of climate change, which is already far worse than originally predicted,” the UN climate chief reiterated, adding that “adaptation actions are still crucial and critical to upgrade small-scaled, fragmented and reactive efforts. But as your report says, the potential to adapt climate change is not limitless. And they were not preventing all losses and damage that we have seen.”

Stiell also said, “adaptation actions cannot substitute for ambitious mitigation.”

He further explained that “adaptation and mitigation actions exist in an inverse relationship. The less we mitigate, the more we have to adapt. So, investing in mitigation is a way to reducing the needs to invest in adaption and resilience.”

Johan Rockstrom from Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research, and co-author of the report listed each of the insights as follow: Vulnerability hotspots cluster in ‘regions at risk’; New threats on the horizon from climate-health interactions; Climate mobility: From evidence to anticipatory action; Human security requires climate security; Sustainable land use is essential to meeting climate targets; Private sustainable finance practices are failing to catalyze deep transitions; Loss and Damage: The urgent planetary imperative; Inclusive decision-making for climate-resilient development; Breaking down structural barriers and unsustainable lock-ins.

On Vulnerability hotspots cluster in ‘regions at risk’, Rockstrom said, “1.6 billion people already today live in ‘vulnerability hotspots’, a number that will double in 2050 if we continue burning fossil fuels as today. Dear friends, that is one third of the earth’s population living in regions that are approaching limitation of adaptation and being at risk of social instability.”

Lisa Schipper from University of Oxford, also a co-author of the report said, “we need to rethink a little bit how we're approaching adaptation and particularly, that we need to consider that vulnerability is a key factor in understanding how to plan adaptation. And this links with the inclusive decision making for climate resilient development that is mentioned in the Insight 9.”

She continued, “we have to think about vulnerability, it offers us a chance to think more inclusively and that means bringing in marginalized groups in the decision-making process, so that we can actually ensure that we don't end up with higher vulnerability and maladaptation.”

Kristie L. Ebi, Co-chair of Future Earth Governing Council said, “the major challenge in the health sector is the lack of investment. Under the UNFCCC adaptation funds, less than half of one percent goes to health. We are not going to achieve the goals that we would like to achieve without ensuring that we have the investment in adaptation, mitigation and resilience.”

The press conference was convened by the international networks Future Earth, The Earth League, World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) with UNFCCC Executive Secretary Simon Stiell.
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