WHO / HEALTH EMERGENCIES UPDATE

Preview Language:   Original
22-Sep-2022 00:05:08
WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said that the pandemic is not over, “but the end is in sight,” adding that “the refrain of the pandemic has been that no one is safe until everyone is safe.” UNIFEED

Available Language: English
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
English
Other Formats
Description
STORY: WHO / HEALTH EMERGENCIES UPDATE
TRT: 5:08
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 22 SEPTEMBER 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, press conference room
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“At our media briefings over the past two weeks, I have said that pandemic is not over, but the end is in sight. Both are true. Being able to see the end does not mean we are at the end. Yes, we’re in a better position, significantly better position than we have ever been. The number of weekly deaths continues to decline and are now just 10 per cent of what they were at the peak in January 2021; Two-thirds of the world’s population is vaccinated, including three-quarters of health workers and older people; In most countries, restrictions have ended, and life looks much like it did before the pandemic. But 10,000 deaths a week is 10,000 too many, when most of these deaths could be prevented.”
3. Wide shot, press conference room
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“The refrain of the pandemic has been that no one is safe until everyone is safe. That means everyone needs to use, when needed, the simple tools that are available to stay safe: distancing, masks and ventilation; And it means everyone needs access to the medical tools to stay safe: vaccines, tests and treatments.”
5. Wide shot, press conference room
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical Lead Covid-19, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“As we have said, we don't declare pandemics, so we won't be declaring if a pandemic is over but this virus is here with us to stay and we have to manage it responsibly. And that is what we are working on with every country. We are working on ending the emergency.”
7. Wide shot, press conference room
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical Lead Covid-19, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“As we enter into the Northern Hemisphere winter season where people spend more time indoors, people are spending more time together, we will have circulation of influenza, as expected. We saw this in the Southern Hemisphere in their winter season. So we need to be prepared. Countries need to be agile.”
9. Wide shot, press conference room
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical Lead Covid-19, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“So there’s quite a way to go but we see that light at the end of the tunnel and we are very hopeful and the reason we are hopeful is because we have so many tools. We just need to make sure that all countries have access to them and that all countries have the policies in place to use them most effectively.”
11. Wide shot, press conference room
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical Lead Covid-19, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“There are some estimates that the people who are suffering from post COVID-19 condition or Long COVID are in the hundreds of millions. There is an estimate that at the end of 2021, that the estimate of people suffering from this is around 144 million and this is before Omicron was circulating, so this is something that is of significant concern to WHO.”
13. Wide shot, press conference room
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Maria Van Kerkhove, Technical Lead Covid-19, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“Many people think COVID-19 is a respiratory disease but this disease affects the brain, it affects the lungs, it affects the circulatory system, the heart. So we are really just beginning to learn about, not just the acute effects of what people are suffering from when they are affected and have a disease course but what happens in the longer term.”
15. Wide shot, press conference room
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“Now to Uganda, where health authorities this week declared an outbreak of Ebola disease. So far, there are seven confirmed cases and one confirmed death, while another seven deaths are being investigated as probable Ebola. Sixteen people with suspected Ebola disease are receiving care, and contact tracing is ongoing. WHO’s experts are on the ground, working with Uganda’s experienced Ebola control teams to reinforce diagnosis, treatment and preventive measures.”
17. Wide shot, press conference room
18. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Ana Maria Henao Restrepo, Co-Lead, Research and Development Blueprint, WHO
“We are in very close contact with all the vaccine developers. There are more than six vaccines being developed and we are very pleased because as you know, WHO R&D Blueprint, since 2015 have identified that this virus is a priority virus for medical countermeasures development. We have a meeting with all the developers and the experts yesterday to identify which of them have already clinical data, meaning phase one data, in terms of safety and immunogenicity. There are three candidate vaccines that have such data and we are now following up with them for the availability of clinical grade doses that can be used for a potential trial if we unfortunately have more cases in Uganda.”
19. Wide shot, press conference room
20. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“Finally, on monkeypox, the number of weekly reported cases continues to decline.
So far this year, more than 62 thousand laboratory-confirmed cases have been reported to WHO from 105 countries and territories, with 23 deaths. The trends are encouraging, but as with COVID-19, this is not the time for any country or community to assume those trends will continue. This is the time to keep doing.”

STORYLINE:

WHO Director-General Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said that the pandemic is not over, “but the end is in sight,” adding that “the refrain of the pandemic has been that no one is safe until everyone is safe.”

WHO’s Dr Maria Van Kerkhove also spoke to the reporters today (22 Sep). She said, “as we enter into the Northern Hemisphere winter season where people spend more time indoors, people are spending more time together, we will have circulation of influenza, as expected. We saw this in the Southern Hemisphere in their winter season. So we need to be prepared. Countries need to be agile.”

She also said, “so there’s quite a way to go but we see that light at the end of the tunnel and we are very hopeful and the reason we are hopeful is because we have so many tools. We just need to make sure that all countries have access to them and that all countries have the policies in place to use them most effectively.”

Dr Kerkhove added, “there are some estimates that the people who are suffering from post COVID-19 condition or Long COVID are in the hundreds of millions. There is an estimate that at the end of 2021, that the estimate of people suffering from this is around 144 million and this is before Omicron was circulating, so this is something that is of significant concern to WHO.”

She continued, “many people think COVID-19 is a respiratory disease but this disease affects the brain, it affects the lungs, it affects the circulatory system, the heart. So we are really just beginning to learn about, not just the acute effects of what people are suffering from when they are affected and have a disease course but what happens in the longer term.”

On the outbreak of Ebola in Uganda, Dr Tedros said, “so far, there are seven confirmed cases and one confirmed death, while another seven deaths are being investigated as probable Ebola. Sixteen people with suspected Ebola disease are receiving care, and contact tracing is ongoing. WHO’s experts are on the ground, working with Uganda’s experienced Ebola control teams to reinforce diagnosis, treatment and preventive measures.”

WHO’s Dr Ana Maria Henao Restrepo told reporters, “we are in very close contact with all the vaccine developers. There are more than six vaccines being developed and we are very pleased because as you know, WHO R&D Blueprint, since 2015 have identified that this virus is a priority virus for medical countermeasures development. We have a meeting with all the developers and the experts yesterday to identify which of them have already clinical data, meaning phase one data, in terms of safety and immunogenicity.”

She added, “there are three candidate vaccines that have such data and we are now following up with them for the availability of clinical grade doses that can be used for a potential trial if we unfortunately have more cases in Uganda.”

On monkeypox, Dr Tedros said, “the number of weekly reported cases continues to decline. So far this year, more than 62 thousand laboratory-confirmed cases have been reported to WHO from 105 countries and territories, with 23 deaths. The trends are encouraging, but as with COVID-19, this is not the time for any country or community to assume those trends will continue. This is the time to keep doing.”
Series
Category
Topical Subjects
Creator
WHO
Alternate Title
unifeed220922k
Asset ID
2937420