UN / EDUCATION SUMMIT CLOSING

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19-Sep-2022 00:02:38
With COVID-19 exposing the fault-lines of education systems globally, more than 130 countries committed to rebooting their education systems and accelerating action to end the learning crisis, at the UN Transforming Education Summit. UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / EDUCATION SUMMIT CLOSING
TRT: 2:38
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 19 SEPTEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, exterior UN Headquarters
2. Wide shot, General Assembly
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General, United Nations:
“With the right to education being deprived to so many, education is losing its power as a great enabler. And with trust breaking down our social fabric frame, our economy changing and our environment under attack, it is clear that education systems are no longer fit for purpose. And that is why the Secretary General sees the transformation of education as an urgent political imperative for our collective futures. This transformation will not happen overnight, but we must get moving and we must do so today.”
4. Med shot, General Assembly
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General, United Nations:
“Ultimately, the transformation of education will only happen if it is demanded by people. And if there's one takeaway from this summit, it is that young people and young students will be the heartbeat of this effort.”
6. Wide shot, General Assembly
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Amina Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General, United Nations:
“A public movement for the transformation of education has begun to emerge. It must be nurtured, it must be supported. Such a movement can be supported by the five world leaders who have accepted the Secretary-General's request to step up as Global Champions for education transformation: the Emir of Qatar, the president of Sierra Leone, the president of Argentina and the Prime Minister of Japan, and the President of the European Commission.”
8. Wide shot, Amina Mohammed in the podium
9. Wide shot, Santiago Irazabal Mourão walks to the podium
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Santiago Irazabal Mourão, President, UNESCO General Conference:
“More than ever, we need to treat it as a vital public good. If we fail to act now, it is the future of humankind that is compromised.”
11. Wide shot, General Assembly
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Santiago Irazabal Mourão, President, UNESCO General Conference:
“This global movement for education is gaining ground across the world, but we know the challenges that remain in these troubled times. We must keep the momentum. In shaping the way forward, our ambition must be to bring lasting solution to the critical issues. This is the importance of the 7th Global Initiative pledged today.”


STORYLINE:

With COVID-19 exposing the fault-lines of education systems globally, more than 130 countries committed to rebooting their education systems and accelerating action to end the learning crisis, at the UN Transforming Education Summit.

Closing the Summit today (19 Sep), Amina Mohammed, the UN Deputy Secretary-General, presented the UN Secretary-General’s Vision Statement on Transforming Education, which lays out a path for education in the 21st century and serves as an input to negotiations in preparation of the Summit of the Future which will be held at the UN General Assembly in 2024.

Mohammed told Member States that “with the right to education being deprived to so many, education is losing its power as a great enabler.”

“And with trust breaking down our social fabric frame, our economy changing and our environment under attack, it is clear that education systems are no longer fit for purpose,” continued Mohammed. “And that is why the Secretary General sees the transformation of education as an urgent political imperative for our collective futures. This transformation will not happen overnight, but we must get moving and we must do so today.”

For the Deputy Secretary-General, “ultimately, the transformation of education will only happen if it is demanded by people.” And according to her, “if there's one takeaway from this summit, it is that young people and young students will be the heartbeat of this effort.”

Mohammed said that “a public movement for the transformation of education has begun to emerge” and now “it must be nurtured, it must be supported.”

“Such a movement can be supported by the five world leaders who have accepted the Secretary-General's request to step up as Global Champions for education transformation: the Emir of Qatar, the president of Sierra Leone, the president of Argentina and the Prime Minister of Japan, and the President of the European Commission,” said Mohammed.

Santiago Irazabal Mourão, the President of UNESCO General Conference, agreed that “more than ever, we need to treat it [education] as a vital public good.”

“If we fail to act now, it is the future of humankind that is compromised,” said Mourão.

The UNESCO official continued, ““This global movement for education is gaining ground across the world, but we know the challenges that remain in these troubled times.”

Mourão urged the countries “keep the momentum”. For him, “in shaping the way forward, our ambition must be to bring lasting solution to the critical issues.”

The Summit dealt with a crisis in education that has seen some 147 million students missing over half of their in-person instruction, since 2020.

In 2021, 244 million children and young people were out of school. The pandemic has harmed the learning of more than 90 percent of the world’s children – the largest disruption in history – with half of all countries cutting their education budgets, further deepening the crisis.

It is now estimated that 64.3 percent of children worldwide, across all countries, are unable to read and understand a simple story. This means that, in a few years, 1 out of 3 persons will be unable to understand this very text, while 840 million young people will leave school in their teens with no qualifications for the workplace of the future. Yet less than half of countries have strategies to help children catch up. If that fails to happen, these students stand to lose $10 trillion in earnings over their working lives.

The commitments came after 115 national consultations that brought together leaders, teachers, students, civil society and other partners to gather collective recommendations on the most urgent asks.

Nearly half of the countries prioritized measures to address learning loss, while a third of countries committed to supporting the psycho-social well-being of both students and teachers. Two in three countries also referenced measures to offset the direct and indirect costs of education for economically vulnerable communities, and 75 percent of countries underlined the importance of gender-sensitive education policies in their commitments.

The Secretary-General and Gordon Brown, the UN Special Envoy for Global Education, together announced the International Facility on Financing for Education (IFFEd), the first-of-its-kind finance facility launched in partnership with the Governments of Sweden, the UK, the Netherlands as well as the Asian and African Development Bank. The IFFEd will provide an initial $2 billion in additional affordable funding for education programs to be disbursed starting in 2023 and could unlock an extra $10 billion of additional financing for education and skills by 2030.

UNESCO and UNICEF launched Gateways to Public Digital Learning, a global multi-partner initiative to create and strengthen inclusive digital learning platforms and content.

A Commitment to Action on Education in Crisis Situations was also revealed, as a commitment by member states and partners to transform education systems to better prevent, prepare for, respond to and recover from crises.

Calls to action were also announced on addressing the learning crisis by boosting foundational learning, advancing gender equality through and in education, and a Greening Education Partnership developed in response to the Secretary-General’s call that the climate crisis is ‘a battle for our lives’.

The SDG 4 High-Level Steering Committee will be responsible for the follow-up process to further shape the future of education and meet 2030 SDG Education targets. The Committee will continue to monitor progress, promote and facilitate knowledge and practice exchange, engage youth, and champion cross-sector and multilateral cooperation.
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