UN / EDUCATION GENDER EQUALITY

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19-Sep-2022 00:02:46
Audrey Azoulay, UNESCO’s Director-General, said that two-thirds of the 771 million adults worldwide who lack basic literacy skills are women. UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / EDUCATION CRISIS SITUATIONS
TRT: 2:46
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGAUGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 19 SEPTEMBER 2022, NEW YORK CITY

SHOTLIST:
1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations
2. Wide shot, conference room
3. SOUNDBITE (French) Audrey Azoulay, Director-General, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO):
“We’ve just passed a symbolic milestone in terms of access to education – on average, around the world, the proportion of girls to boys who are in schools is now the same; they are equally represented according to the most recent figures. But you know, this also covers a huge regional disparity, which tells us where we should focus our action.”
[“Nous venons de passer un cap symbolique en matière d’accès à l’éducation – en moyenne dans le monde, la proportion de filles et de garçons scolarisés est désormais la même selon les derniers chiffres. Mais vous les savez, cela découvre énormes disparités régionales qui nous disent où concentrer notre action.”]
4. Wide shot, conference room
5. SOUNDBITE (French) Audrey Azoulay, Director-General, United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO):
“Much remains to be done to achieve equality with men in education because we have generations and generations of inequalities in this area. And what it does is that among all today's adults, among the 771 million adults worldwide who lack basic literacy skills, the injustice is there, two-thirds of these people are women.”
[“Il reste beaucoup à faire pour atteindre l’égalité avec les hommes en matière d’éducation, parce que nous avons des générations et des générations d’inégalités en la matière. Et ce qu’il fait que chez les adultes d’aujourd’hui, chez les 771 millions d'adultes à travers le monde qui n’ont pas les compétences de base en matière d'alphabétisation, l’injustice est là, deux tiers de ces personnes sont des femmes.”]
6. Med shot, participants
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Catherine M. Russell, Executive Director, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF):
“In recent years, we have seen real progress. More governments have begun developing gender-responsive education sector plans and targeting investment to close gender gaps, with a focus on reaching the most marginalized girls.”
8. Wide shot, panel speakers walking on stage
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Malala Yousafzai, 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate / Messenger of Peace, United Nations:
“We are facing a proven education crisis, especially for girls. COVID-19 has had a huge impact on education. Millions of girls will never be able to return to their schools. Most of them are forced to get married or help their families financially.”
10. Wide shot, panel
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Malala Yousafzai, 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate / Messenger of Peace, United Nations:
“The number of girls who are out of school - 130 million - is at risk of not going down, but rather increasing. This should not be happening right now.”
12. Various shots, participants
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Sima Bahous, Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations / Executive Director of UN Women:
“Earlier this month, UN Women published data that show – based on current rates of
progress – that women and girls will not achieve full equality with men and boys for another 300 years.”
14. Med shot, participants
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Sima Bahous, Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations / Executive Director of UN Women:
“We gather at a time when global gender equality and women’s rights are in acute danger. Education is not only a critical tool to combat this, it is the means to fundamentally improve the lives of women, girls, families, and whole communities. We must hold each other accountable for doing so and safeguard our progress.”
16. Wide shot, Bahous leaving the stage

STORYLINE:
Audrey Azoulay, UNESCO’s Director-General, said that two-thirds of the 771 million adults worldwide who lack basic literacy skills are women.

Talking at the Transforming Education Summit event ‘Advancing gender equality and girls’ and women’s empowerment in and through education’ today (19 Sep), Azoulay said, “We’ve just passed a symbolic milestone in terms of access to education – on average, around the world, the proportion of girls to boys who are in schools is now the same; they are equally represented according to the most recent figures.”

She also said, “But you know, this also covers up a huge regional disparity, which then tells us where we should focus our action.”

According to Azoulay, much remains to be done to achieve equality in education “because we have generations and generations of inequalities in this area.”

Also talking at the event today, Catherine M. Russell, UNICEF’s Executive Director, said that in recent years, more governments have begun developing gender-responsive education sector plans and targeting investment to close gender gaps, with a focus on reaching the most marginalized girls.

Malala Yousafzai, 2014 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate and UN Messenger of Peace, stated, “We are facing a proven education crisis, especially for girls. COVID-19 has had a huge impact on education.”

She said that millions of girls will never be able to return to school and that most of them are forced to get married or help their families financially.

Yousafzai also said, “The number of girls who are out of school - 130 million - is at risk of not going down, but rather increasing. This should not be happening right now.”

In closing remarks, Sima Bahous, Under-Secretary-General of the United Nations / Executive Director of UN Women, said, “We gather at a time when global gender equality and women’s rights are in acute danger.”

She stated, “Education is not only a critical tool to combat this, it is the means to fundamentally improve the lives of women, girls, families, and whole communities.”

She concluded, “We must hold each other accountable for doing so and safeguard our progress.”

While progress has been made in recent decades, gender inequalities persist in education.

Gains are also fragile as COVID-19, armed conflict, refugee and internal displacement, climate-induced disasters, and a growing backlash against gender equality and women's and girls' rights are reversing progress and widening inequalities in many contexts.

Education systems must make a more explicit and active commitment to addressing the gender-based barriers, stigma, and discrimination that keep learners from fulfilling their right to education and future life, work, and leadership opportunities.

But action is also needed to harness education's power to unlock the potential of learners in all their diversity, end harmful gender norms, attitudes, and practices, and transform institutions to achieve just, equal, and inclusive societies.

The Spotlight Session 5 offered a space for high-level dialogue among heads of state, leaders, and key influencers to commit to accelerating progress on gender equality and girls' and women's empowerment in and through education.
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