UN / AFGHANISTAN

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29-Aug-2022 00:04:39
The UN Humanitarian Affairs chief, Martin Griffiths, told the Security Council that “the people in Afghanistan continue to face extreme hardship and uncertainty”, with close to 19 million people facing acute levels of food insecurity, including 6 million people at risk of famine. UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / AFGHANISTAN
TRT: 4:39
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 29 AUGUST 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

RECENT - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, United Nations Headquarters

29 AUGUST 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Griffiths, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“The people in Afghanistan continue to face extreme hardship and uncertainty. And let me share some numbers with you. Close to 19 million people are facing acute levels of food insecurity, including 6 million people at risk of famine. More than half the population – some 24 million people – need humanitarian assistance and an estimated 3 million children are acutely malnourished. They include over 1 million children estimated to be suffering from the most severe, life-threatening form of malnutrition. Without specialized treatment, these children could die.”
4. Wide shot, Security Council
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Griffiths, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“Afghanistan’s crisis is a humanitarian crisis, but it’s not only that. It’s an economic crisis. It’s a climate crisis. It’s a hunger crisis. It’s a financial crisis. But it’s not a hopeless crisis.”
6. Close up, Security Council president
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Griffiths, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“Afghanistan’s de facto authorities must do their part. Bureaucratic interferences and procedures slow down humanitarian assistance when it is needed most. Female humanitarian aid workers – both national and international – must be allowed to work unhindered and securely. And girls must be allowed to continue their education. There are many musts, Mr. President, but there are many opportunities. The path is clear. The people of Afghanistan have shown incredible resilience over the decades and in this last year. Our task is to help them to prosper, to flourish and to be safe.”
8. Wide shot, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Markus Potzel, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Afghanistan:
“First, the current regime in Afghanistan has not been recognized by any member of the international community. The reasons for this are clear. The international community has norms regarding human rights, especially those of women and girls; representative governance; and international collective security. Afghanistan is part of this international system and the Taliban need to adhere to their international obligations, but instead request recognition based on the fact that they have secured territorial control.”
10. Close up, Security Council president
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Markus Potzel, Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Afghanistan:
“Afghanistan itself, I believe, has not recovered from serious geopolitical shocks and interventions by foreign powers. None of these interventions have achieved their designs. All of them have altered Afghanistan in ways that were unexpected and perhaps unhelpful. Despite immense resources expended over the past decades, Afghanistan remains significantly underdeveloped, vulnerable, and in need of international assistance.”
12. Med shot, Security Council
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Lucy Morgan Edwards, Independent researcher and author:
“This rapid disintegration of Afghanistan following the departure of the international community last year is no surprise. To those paying attention, the signs of how these would all end were already visible in 2001.”
14. Close up, Security Council president
15. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Naseer Ahmad Faiq, Chargé d’Affaires of the Afghanistan Permanent Mission to the UN:
“I call on the Taliban to protect and respect the fundamental human rights of all citizens of Afghanistan without prejudice based on gender, ethnic and religious identity. This includes re-opening girls’ schools and restoring of women’s full human rights, honoring their amnesty announcement immediately ending detainment, torture and forced displacements and extra-judicial killings of former security forces, civilians and bringing the perpetrators of these acts to justice. These acts are violations of international human rights and international humanitarian laws as well as Islamic values and principles.”
16. Wide shot, Security Council

STORYLINE:

The UN Humanitarian Affairs chief, Martin Griffiths, told the Security Council that “the people in Afghanistan continue to face extreme hardship and uncertainty”, with close to 19 million people facing acute levels of food insecurity, including 6 million people at risk of famine.


Addressing the Council today (29 Aug), the Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator said that more than half the population – some 24 million people – need humanitarian assistance and an estimated 3 million children are acutely malnourished.

The number includes over 1 million children estimated to be suffering from the most severe, life-threatening form of malnutrition.

According to Griffiths, “without specialized treatment, these children could die.”

For the Humanitarian Affairs chief, “Afghanistan’s crisis is a humanitarian crisis, but it’s not only that. It’s an economic crisis. It’s a climate crisis. It’s a hunger crisis. It’s a financial crisis. But it’s not a hopeless crisis.”

Griffiths also believes that “Afghanistan’s de facto authorities must do their part.”

The Under-Secretary-General said that “bureaucratic interferences and procedures slow down humanitarian assistance when it is needed most” and “female humanitarian aid workers – both national and international – must be allowed to work unhindered and securely.”

“And girls must be allowed to continue their education. There are many musts, Mr. President, but there are many opportunities. The path is clear. The people of Afghanistan have shown incredible resilience over the decades and in this last year. Our task is to help them to prosper, to flourish and to be safe”, concluded Griffiths.

The Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Afghanistan, Markus Potzel, also addressed the Council, noting that the current regime “has not been recognized by any member of the international community” and “the reasons for this are clear.”

Potzel said that “the international community has norms regarding human rights, especially those of women and girls; representative governance; and international collective security.”

According to the expert, “Afghanistan is part of this international system and the Taliban need to adhere to their international obligations, but instead request recognition based on the fact that they have secured territorial control.”

Potzel also said that he believes that Afghanistan “has not recovered from serious geopolitical shocks and interventions by foreign powers.”

“None of these interventions have achieved their designs. All of them have altered Afghanistan in ways that were unexpected and perhaps unhelpful. Despite immense resources expended over the past decades, Afghanistan remains significantly underdeveloped, vulnerable, and in need of international assistance”, said the Deputy Special Representative.

Lucy Morgan Edwards, and independent researcher and author, told the Council Members that “this rapid disintegration of Afghanistan following the departure of the international community last year is no surprise.”

According to Edwards, “to those paying attention, the signs of how these would all end were already visible in 2001.”

The Chargé d’Affaires of the Afghanistan Permanent Mission to the UN, Naseer Ahmad Faiq, called “on the Taliban to protect and respect the fundamental human rights of all citizens of Afghanistan without prejudice based on gender, ethnic and religious identity.”

For Faiq, “this includes re-opening girls’ schools and restoring of women’s full human rights, honoring their amnesty announcement immediately ending detainment, torture and forced displacements and extra-judicial killings of former security forces, civilians and bringing the perpetrators of these acts to justice.”

These acts, concluded the Chargé d’Affaires, “are violations of international human rights and international humanitarian laws as well as Islamic values and principles.”
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