ILO / YOUTH EMPLOYMENT

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11-Aug-2022 00:03:18
According to a new report by the International Labour Organization, recovery in youth employment is still lagging, which confirms that the COVID-19 pandemic has hurt young people more than any other age group. ILO

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STORY: ILO / YOUTH EMPLOYMENT
TRT: 3:18
SOURCE: ILO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 11 AUGUST 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / FILE
SHOTLIST:

FILE - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

1. Wide shots, exterior, ILO headquarters

11 AUGUST 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Martha Newton, Deputy Director-General for Policy, International Labour Organization (ILO):
“The ILO’s major report, ‘Global Employment Trends for youth 2022 - Investing and transforming futures for young people’, which we're launching today, examines the state of youth labor markets in the wake of the COVID 19 pandemic and assesses how investments in various areas such as the green and blue economies, in the digital economy, the care sector, could promote and accelerate, sorely needed recovery of youth labor markets.”

FILE - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

3. Wide shots, exterior, ILO headquarters

11 AUGUST 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Martha Newton, Deputy Director-General for Policy, International Labour Organization (ILO):
“So, the main findings of the report are that there are today 73 million unemployed youth around the globe. And that's too high. We had a slight increase from 2021 to 2022. But when you look at youth unemployment data, in pre-pandemic levels, we’re still 6 million jobs in the hole. So, we really need to focus and think about what strategies we can implement for youth in order to capitalize on their full potential and ensure that they're able to help us, the human-centered to recovery. ”

FILE - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

5. Wide shots, exterior, ILO headquarters

11 AUGUST 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

6. SOUNDBITE (English) Martha Newton, Deputy Director-General for Policy, International Labour Organization (ILO):
“Well, it shows that the impact of COVID and this crisis have a feminine face. And so, in many parts of the world, we see that there really is a divergence and that, in particular, women, young women are not able to compete. They're either withdrawing from the labor market completely, or they're busy with caregiving at home. And one of the interesting analyses in this report is on the care economy and how the vital role that it can play for youth. And so, I think one of the things that excite me is not only to think about the report from what you can do for youth but what youth can do for us. I think that's really one of the most important things to come out of this report is seeing some of the successful strategies that we highlight around the globe, to show how youth are contributing to the human-centered recovery and beyond.”

FILE - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

7. Wide shots, exterior, ILO headquarters

11 AUGUST 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

8. SOUNDBITE (English) Martha Newton, Deputy Director-General for Policy, International Labour Organization (ILO):
“So, when we look at youth unemployment, one of the biggest challenges is skills. We need to make sure that youth have the skills that they need for the jobs of tomorrow. We've seen with this acceleration of digitalization and other issues because of the COVID 19 pandemic youth were some of the first to adjust and respond, but they also had an impact of crisis, and then your education was disrupted. And so, we have to find those particular key points where we can connect youth to opportunities in the future. And so, skills development is key, investing in entrepreneurship, young entrepreneurs and teaching them what they need to do to be able to, you know, not only hold a job but how they can grow their own business. These are some of the strategies in the report that really excite me.”

FILE - GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

9. Wide shots, exterior, ILO headquarters

STORYLINE:
According to a new report by the International Labour Organization (ILO), the recovery in youth employment is still lagging, which confirms that the COVID-19 pandemic has hurt young people more than any other age group.

The Global Employment Trends for Youth 2022 report finds that the pandemic has exacerbated the numerous labour market challenges facing those aged between 15 and 24 years, who have experienced a much higher percentage loss in employment than adults since early 2020.

The global number of unemployed youths is estimated to reach 73 million in 2022, a slight improvement from 2021 (75 million).

However, still six million above the pre-pandemic level of 2019, the report says.

The report finds that undertaking the green, digital and care measures together as part of a big investment push would raise global gross domestic product (GDP) by 4.2 percent and create an additional 139 million jobs for workers of all ages worldwide, of which 32 million would be accounted by young people.

Decent work Investment in these sectors must be accompanied by the promotion of decent working conditions for all young workers, the study says.

This includes ensuring that they enjoy fundamental rights and protections, including freedom of association, the right to collective bargaining, equal pay for work of equal value, and freedom from violence and harassment at work.
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ILO
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unifeed220811a
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2920670