UN / CHILDREN AND ARMED CONFLICT

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19-Jul-2022 00:02:36
As she presented the annual report of the Secretary-General to the Security Council, the Special Representative for Children and Armed Conflict, Virginia Gamba, said, “eight thousand children were either killed or maimed during 2021, making this the most prevalent of all grave violations.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / CHILDREN AND ARMED CONFLICT
TRT: 02:36
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 19 JULY 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior UN Headquarters

19 JULY 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. Wide shot, the Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict, Virginia Gamba, at the Security Council dais
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Virginia Gamba, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict:
“Eight thousand children were either killed or maimed during 2021, making this the most prevalent of all grave violations. The use of explosive remnants of war, improvised explosive devices, and landmines had a particularly devastating impact and caused a quarter of these child casualties. The use of explosive weapons in populated areas also critically endangered children.”
5. Med shot, delegates
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Virginia Gamba, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict:
“It is vital that United Nations operations on the ground are adequately mandated, staffed, and funded to continue carrying out monitoring, reporting, engaging with parties, developing joint action plans, providing technical assistance to signatories for implementation purposes, and the undertaking of many other often life-saving interventions including securing the release of children from conflict.”
7. Wide shot, Council
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Virginia Gamba, Special Representative of the Secretary-General for Children and Armed Conflict:
“The release and reintegration of children is one of the most concrete outcomes of our common work and over 12,200 children were released from armed groups and forces last year, often following United Nations advocacy. This number has remained steady over the past five years, which is a great accomplishment.”
9. Wide shot, Council
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Catherine M. Russell, Executive Director, United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF):
“As member states you have enormous power to drive progress to protect children. Respectfully, but urgently we call on you today to do more. Insist on compliance with international humanitarian law, yes, of course, but we also request that you go beyond the requirements of the law. You have the power to use military orders with zero tolerance policies on grave violations against children. Please use that power. Endorse and implement the Safe Schools declaration to protect children and schools from attack and misuse by parties to conflict. Endorse and implement the Paris Principles to demobilize and reintegrate children who have been used by armed forces and groups. We call on you to use your influence to push states and non-state armed groups to prevent and end grave violations against children.”
11. Wide shot, Council

STORYLINE:

As she presented the annual report of the Secretary-General to the Security Council, the Special Representative for Children and Armed Conflict, Virginia Gamba, today (19 Jul) said, “eight thousand children were either killed or maimed during 2021, making this the most prevalent of all grave violations.”

The use of explosive remnants of war, improvised explosive devices, and landmines, she said, “had a particularly devastating impact and caused a quarter of these child casualties.” She added that “the use of explosive weapons in populated areas also critically endangered children.”

The UN verified close to 24,000 grave violations, with over 19,000 child victims. Other grave violations include the recruitment and use of children for, in, and by parties to armed conflict, the denial of humanitarian access to children,
abductions and rape as well as other forms of sexual violence.

Among other recommendations, Gamba said it was “vital that United Nations operations on the ground are adequately mandated, staffed, and funded to continue carrying out monitoring, reporting, engaging with parties, developing joint action plans, providing technical assistance to signatories for implementation purposes, and the undertaking of many other often life-saving interventions including securing the release of children from conflict.”

The Special Representative also reported some signs of hope and recovery during 2021. She said, “the release and reintegration of children is one of the most concrete outcomes of our common work and over 12,200 children were released from armed groups and forces last year, often following United Nations advocacy. This number has remained steady over the past five years, which is a great accomplishment.”

Also addressing the Council, the Head of UNICEF, Catherine Russell, called on member states “to do more” and “go beyond the requirements of the law” to protect children.

Russell said, “you have the power to use military orders with zero tolerance policies on grave violations against children. Please use that power. Endorse and implement the Safe Schools declaration to protect children and schools from attack and misuse by parties to conflict. Endorse and implement the Paris Principles to demobilize and reintegrate children who have been used by armed forces and groups. We call on you to use your influence to push states and non-state armed groups to prevent and end grave violations against children. “

The situations in Ethiopia, Mozambique, and Ukraine, were added to the children and armed conflict agenda in the 2021 report.
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