SOUTH SUDAN / GENDER NETWORKS

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19-Jul-2022 00:06:14
A recent launch of two networks for women in South Sudan’s Security Sector provide a platform for uniformed female personnel in both the police and military to advocate for gender-responsive security institutions. UNMISS

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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / GENDER NETWORKS
TRT: 6:14
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 04 AND 06 JULY 2022, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – UNMISS - 12 SEPTEMBER 2018 ADDIS, ETHIOPIA

1. Various shots, signing


04 JULY 2022, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN


2. Various shots, SSPDF workshop


06 JULY 2022, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

3. Wide shot, South Sudanese Police personnel


04 JULY 2022, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

4. SOUNDBITE (English) Fidensia Charles Ladu South Sudan Human Rights Commission:
“I know very well that it will benefit women because women in uniform play a very big role because during this time people have been pointing fingers at the organized forces that they are the cause of all the atrocities, but with the inclusion of women, as we know, women are peace-lovers, women are peace-builders, and with their inclusion, maybe things will change. We need the men to be there side by side to serve and to help the security of the nation.”

06 JULY 2022, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

5. Various shots, South Sudanese National Police Service workshop
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Police Commissioner, UNMISS:
“A gender diverse service is necessary to create a safe and secure service for women often approach and solve problems from different perspectives from their male counterparts. it is widely recognized that women police play a crucial role in responding to and preventing gender violence and crimes against women and children as a service you should strive to empower female officers 2 enable to address these issues in this community which will in the end improve the perception of the whole Service.”
7. Med Shot, South Sudanese National Police Service Workshop
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Sala Turunen United Nations Women Representative
“Women’s networks are vital as we know that increasing the number of women in the security sector contributes significantly to women’s overall security. Examples of these include protecting women's rights during armed conflict, preventing inequality for gender-based crimes, mainstreaming gender aspects in security issues and increasing women's participation in various spaces before during and after conflict. Importantly women in uniform also act as role models in the local environment, inspiring other women, and girls in male dominated societies to push for their own rights and participation in these processes. Increasing recruitment of women in the security sector is critical for empowering women in communities and addresses specific needs of women and girls in conflict and post conflict settings. While we know many barriers exist for women entering the security sector, today we hope to address some of those barriers and specific challenges to women and girls.”
04 JULY 2022, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

9. Various shots, South Sudan’s military personnel
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Lt. Col. Harriet Fouzia Ginaba Kyekawo:
“Our men are not involving us. How many women chiefs are their South Sudan – none. So let men give women a chance. For them to work alone, it is not good. Let us work together – to involve our women in all sectors. Like in Ghana women are involved in protocol work, women are involved in VIP, women are involved in working in other countries. What is the difference between us and other countries? My message is let us have policies of recruiting our girls - our educated girls, our educated women in the Security Sector, so that tomorrow they will go for peacekeeping. Peacekeeping is for Africa, so our children will also go if we don't go but our children should also go and join so as to more knowledge and bring to South Sudan.”
11. Various shots, SSPDF workshop
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Major General Brigadier Makent Makur Budi SSPDF:
“This workshop is very important in so many ways. It shows that the enrollment of women in the army means a lot because if there is participation of women in any institution, it creates equality and women empowerment in the institution or in the Ministry of Defense.”
13. Wide shot, photo session

STORYLINE:

A recent launch of two networks for women in South Sudan’s Security Sector provide a platform for uniformed female personnel in both the police and military to advocate for gender-responsive security institutions.

Following South Sudan’s September 2018’s signing of the Revitalized Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict, the provision of a 35 percent affirmative action quota was a great win for women in various sectors countrywide.

For those in the Security Sector, that is, the organized forces - reform within the sector was flagged as a priority.

Reform can allow for unity amongst fighting forces, and this can in turn help reduce the likelihood of renewed war.

Speaking at the launch, of the networks where the organized forces had group discussions and debates and participants received awareness training in human rights sensitization, a top Human Rights official in the country encouraged participants and stressed that their participation in the sector is important.


SOUNDBITE (English) Fidensia Charles Ladu South Sudan Human Rights Commission:
“I know very well that it will benefit women because women in uniform play a very big role because during this time people have been pointing fingers at the organized forces that they are the cause of all the atrocities, but with the inclusion of women, as we know, women are peace-lovers, women are peace-builders, and with their inclusion, maybe things will change. We need the men to be there side by side to serve and to help the security of the nation.”

The United Nations Women (UN Women), United Nations Development Program (UNDP) and the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), have partnered in supporting the gender mainstreaming reform process in South Sudan under a project funded by the Secretary General’s Peacebuilding Fund, where women’s networks in the police, military, prisons service, civil defense, wildlife, and national security will be launched separately.

The umbrella National Network – the South Sudan Security Sector Women’s Network, was launched in May.
Rallying the police participants, the UNMISS Police Commissioner encouraged them saying that the network will give them a unified voice to address gender specific issues that they may have overlooked.

SOUNDBITE (English) Police Commissioner, UNMISS:
“A gender diverse service is necessary to create a safe and secure service for women often approach and solve problems from different perspectives from their male counterparts. it is widely recognized that women police play a crucial role in responding to and preventing gender violence and crimes against women and children as a service you should strive to empower female officers 2 enable to address these issues in this community which will in the end improve the perception of the whole Service.”

A UN Women representative said that advancing the rights of women and girls would ensure security at community and at the national levels.

SOUNDBITE (English) Sala Turunen United Nations Women Representative:
Women’s networks are vital as we know that increasing the number of women in the security sector contributes significantly to women’s overall security. Examples of these include protecting women's rights during armed conflict, preventing inequality for gender-based crimes, mainstreaming gender aspects in security issues and increasing women's participation in various spaces before during and after conflict. Importantly women in uniform also act as role models in the local environment, inspiring other women, and girls in male dominated societies to push for their own rights and participation in these processes. Increasing recruitment of women in the security sector is critical for empowering women in communities and addresses specific needs of women and girls in conflict and post conflict settings. While we know many barriers exist for women entering the security sector, today we hope to address some of those barriers and specific challenges to women and girls.

Lamenting about their status and rankings, one of the female participants the sectors would involve the women more.

SOUNDBITE (English) Lt. Col. Harriet Fouzia Ginaba Kyekawo:
“Our men are not involving us. How many women chiefs are their South Sudan – none. So let men give women a chance. For them to work alone, it is not good. Let us work together – to involve our women in all sectors. Like in Ghana women are involved in protocol work, women are involved in VIP, women are involved in working in other countries. What is the difference between us and other countries? My message is let us have policies of recruiting our girls - our educated girls, our educated women in the Security Sector, so that tomorrow they will go for peacekeeping. Peacekeeping is for Africa, so our children will also go if we don't go but our children should also go and join so as to more knowledge and bring to South Sudan.”

A senior male military official said women are as capable as men, and their enrolment an make a difference.

SOUNDBITE (English) Major General Brigadier Makent Makur Budi SSPDF:
“This workshop is very important in so many ways. It shows that the enrollment of women in the army means a lot because if there is participation of women in any institution, it creates equality and women empowerment in the institution or in the Ministry of Defense.”

And as women’s recruitment and ranking in the Security Sector continues to remain a concern countrywide, there is relief that these networks will allow the current cohorts to boldly step forward as role models for the younger generation, while making it attractive to join the service.
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UNMISS
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