UN / YEMEN

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11-Jul-2022 00:04:19
UN Special Envoy for Yemen Hans Grundberg told the Security Council, “the alternative to the truce is a return to hostilities and likely an intensified phase of conflict with all of its predictable consequences for Yemeni civilians and regional security.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / YEMEN
TRT: 4:19
SOURCE: UNIFEED
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ARABIC / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 11 JULY 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1.Wide shot, exterior, United Nations Headquarters

11 JULY 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2.Wide shot, Security Council
3.SOUNDBITE (English) Hans Grundberg, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen:
“Let us be clear, the alternative to the truce is a return to hostilities and likely an intensified phase of conflict with all of its predictable consequences for Yemeni civilians and regional security. I have already outlined the many tangible benefits of the truce for Yemeni men and women. The relative calm it has afforded has also allowed for the resumption of some public works and encouraged international investments. In light of increasing fuel prices and the global economic situation, even more needs to be done to ensure that fuel, electricity, and consumer goods are available and affordable for civilians across the country.”
4.Wide shot, Security Council
5.SOUNDBITE (English) Hans Grundberg, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen:

“To date, the truce has been holding for over three months. It has resulted in a significant reduction in civilian casualties, with the number of civilian casualties reduced by two thirds compared to the three months before the truce began. Due to the sharp decline in hostilities, conflict-related civilian casualties are now mostly due to landmines and unexploded ordnance, which continue to pose a threat to civilians, including children, as they return to areas where hostilities have decreased.”
6.Wide shot, Security Council
7.SOUNDBITE (English) Hans Grundberg, Special Envoy of the Secretary-General for Yemen:
“Since the truce renewal, seven fuel ships carrying nearly 200 thousand metric tons of various fuel products have been cleared to enter Hudaydah port. High fuel prices have chipped away at the benefit for Yemeni citizens. But there is no doubt that without the imports facilitated by the truce the situation would be far worse. The flow of fuel imports has helped to avoid disruptions in essential public services that depend partly on fuel – such as clean water, healthcare, electricity, and transportation – and has made a valuable difference to the daily lives and well-being of Yemenis.”
8.Wide shot, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Joyce Msuya, Assistant Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“Humanitarian needs across the country – including risk of famine in some areas – could rise sharply in the coming weeks and months. The international community must act quickly and decisively to stop this.”
10. Wide shot, Security Council
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Joyce Msuya, Assistant Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“The Ukraine war is also threatening the supply chains that bring in Yemen’s food – nearly 90 per cent of which must be imported. Last year, just under half of all wheat came from Russia and Ukraine.”
12. Wide shot, Security Council
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Joyce Msuya, Assistant Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“Intimidation and incitement against aid agencies have continued across Yemen. This is being fuelled by misinformation amplified through social media, messaging apps and in some public forums.”
14.Wide shot, Security Council
15. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Abdullah al-Saadi, Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Yemen:
“Furthermore, the Yemeni Government has demonstrated flexibility and has reacted in favor to all humanitarian actions to alleviate the suffering of the people that's in fact being exploited by the Houthi militia for political gains. There's been the reopening of the Sonaa Airport, the resumption of commercial flights, and also oil being brought into the Hodeidah Port. The Houthi militia are using income to fuel the war against the Yemeni people and their own enrichment instead of paying their civil servants in the areas that they control. So this is in violation of the Stockholm Agreement the Yemeni government would reiterate the importance of implementing all provisions of the truce, including the lifting of the siege of Tiaz.”
16. Wide shot, Security Council


STORYLINE:

UN Special Envoy for Yemen Hans Grundberg told the Security Council, “the alternative to the truce is a return to hostilities and likely an intensified phase of conflict with all of its predictable consequences for Yemeni civilians and regional security.”

With the deadline for the truce extension a mere three weeks away, the Special Envoy today (11 Jul) highlighted what has been achieved in the three and a half months of the truce, and discussed some of the obstacles his Office has faced in the implementation. Grundberg also outlined a way forward that includes extending, consolidating, and expanding on the truce to increase the benefits to Yemen’s population and move toward a political settlement.

He said, “to date, the truce has been holding for over three months. It has resulted in a significant reduction in civilian casualties, with the number of civilian casualties reduced by two thirds compared to the three months before the truce began.”

The Special Envoy continued, “due to the sharp decline in hostilities, conflict-related civilian casualties are now mostly due to landmines and unexploded ordnance, which continue to pose a threat to civilians, including children, as they return to areas where hostilities have decreased.”

The renewal of the truce on 2 June has allowed the continued flow of fuel into Hudaydah port, Grundberg said.

He explained, “since the truce renewal, seven fuel ships carrying nearly 200 thousand metric tons of various fuel products have been cleared to enter Hudaydah port. High fuel prices have chipped away at the benefit for Yemeni citizens. But there is no doubt that without the imports facilitated by the truce the situation would be far worse.”

The Special Envoy continued, “the flow of fuel imports has helped to avoid disruptions in essential public services that depend partly on fuel – such as clean water, healthcare, electricity, and transportation – and has made a valuable difference to the daily lives and well-being of Yemenis.”

Joyce Msuya, Assistant Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Deputy Emergency Relief Coordinator also briefed the Council.
She reiterated that Yemen’s humanitarian catastrophe is about to get much worse.

The deputy chief of the humanitarian affairs said, “humanitarian needs across the country – including risk of famine in some areas – could rise sharply in the coming weeks and months. The international community must act quickly and decisively to stop this.”

Msuya also said, “the Ukraine war is also threatening the supply chains that bring in Yemen’s food – nearly 90 per cent of which must be imported. Last year, just under half of all wheat came from Russia and Ukraine.”

She reiterated that given the acute emergency, quick action is needed to address these challenges. 13.
Msuya also highlighted that aid work is becoming more difficult and more dangerous.

She said, “intimidation and incitement against aid agencies have continued across Yemen. This is being fuelled by misinformation amplified through social media, messaging apps and in some public forums.”

Yemeni Ambassador Abdullah al-Saadi also briefed the Council.

He said, “the Yemeni Government has demonstrated flexibility and has reacted in favor to all humanitarian actions to alleviate the suffering of the people that's in fact being exploited by the Houthi militia for political gains. There's been the reopening of the Sonaa Airport, the resumption of commercial flights, and also oil being brought into the Hodeidah Port.”

Ambassador al-Saadi continued, “the Houthi militia are using income to fuel the war against the Yemeni people and their own enrichment instead of paying their civil servants in the areas that they control. So this is in violation of the Stockholm Agreement the Yemeni government would reiterate the importance of implementing all provisions of the truce, including the lifting of the siege of Tiaz.”
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