UN / LIBYA

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27-Jun-2022 00:03:59
The top UN political affairs official stressed the importance of holding elections in Libya during a Security Council meeting, saying it is “the only path to settle the disagreements over the democratic legitimacy of all Libyan institutions.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / LIBYA
TRT: 3:59
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 27 JUNE 2022, NEW YORK CITY – FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, UN headquarters, exterior

27 JUNE 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary DiCarlo, Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations:
“We are firmly convinced that elections are the only path to settle the disagreements over the democratic legitimacy of all Libyan institutions.”
4. Close up, Security Council president
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary DiCarlo, Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations:
“Continued political divisions are contributing to a tense security environment in and around Tripoli. The issue of the executive is yet to be resolved. As armed groups continue to position themselves in support of either Mr. Dbeibah or Mr. Bashagha, the risk of escalation increases. I reiterate the United Nations readiness to facilitate dialogue between Mr. Dbeibah and Mr. Bashagha.”
6. Close up, Security Council president
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary DiCarlo, Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations:
“On the economic front, the partial shutdown of Libya’s oil sector continues. Since 16 April, the shutdown has reduced Libyan oil exports by one third and cost the country 3.1 billion US dollars in lost revenue. In addition, the disagreement over the control and use of public funds that triggered the partial shutdown continues and could lead to further oil field closures in the near term.”
8. Wide shot, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary DiCarlo, Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations:
“Those responsible for grave human rights violations, including atrocity crimes, must be held accountable domestically or, as applicable, by international justice mechanisms, such as the International Criminal Court. Regrettably, for many victims and survivors, justice and accountability – including remedies and reparation – are illusive or painfully slow.”
10. Close up, Security Council president
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary DiCarlo, Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations:
“In closing, let me stress that Libya has made significant progress in the last few years toward a more inclusive society. For the sake of the Libyan people, we should not allow this progress to dissipate.”
12. Wide shot, Security Council
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Bushra Alhodiri, Operation Manager, Fezzan Libya Organisation:
“More than a decade has passed since the peaceful revolution turned to an armed internal war. Those of us who live in Libya nowadays struggle to survive, especially women and youth.
One of the biggest issues impeding women's participation in politics, preventing gender equality, and marginalizing women's future engagement is women's insecurity in Libya.”
14. Close up, Security Council president
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Bushra Alhodiri, Operation Manager, Fezzan Libya Organisation:
“Increasing the number of women in public service is an excellent starting point but achieving meaningful participation for women also requires adopting pro-women legislation. It is time for Libyan policymakers and the international community to understand that achieving true democracy, justice, and equality for everyone requires women's significant participation.”
16. Wide shot, Security Council
17. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Taher M. T. Elsonni, Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Libya:
“The political situation is still an impasse and the suffering of our people continues. We are witnessing an energy and electricity crisis in our region. The anger of the people is increasing. The Libyan people is increasingly frustrated and I doubt that any of our people would like to follow this session. Therefore, I would like to apologize from the Libyan men and women if I am going to repeat today what you have already heard in previous sessions.”
18. Wide shot, Security Council


STORYLINE:

The top UN political affairs official stressed the importance of holding elections in Libya during a Security Council meeting, saying it is “the only path to settle the disagreements over the democratic legitimacy of all Libyan institutions.”

The Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, Rosemary DiCarlo, told the Council on Monday (27 June), that “continued political divisions are contributing to a tense security environment in and around Tripoli.”

According to DiCarlo, “as armed groups continue to position themselves in support of either Mr. Dbeibah or Mr. Bashagha, the risk of escalation increases.”

The Under-Secretary-General reiterated the United Nations readiness to facilitate dialogue between Mr. Dbeibah and Mr. Bashagha.

“On the economic front, DiCarlo informed that the partial shutdown of Libya’s oil sector continues.

Since 16 April, the shutdown has reduced Libyan oil exports by one third and cost the country 3.1 billion US dollars in lost revenue.

“In addition, the disagreement over the control and use of public funds that triggered the partial shutdown continues and could lead to further oil field closures in the near term”, the top political affairs official said.

DiCarlo also addressed the human rights situation, saying that “those responsible for grave human rights violations, including atrocity crimes, must be held accountable domestically or, as applicable, by international justice mechanisms, such as the International Criminal Court.”

Regrettably, she added, “for many victims and survivors, justice and accountability – including remedies and reparation – are illusive or painfully slow.”

In closing, the Under-Secretary-General stressed that Libya “has made significant progress in the last few years toward a more inclusive society” and, for the sake of the Libyan people, the international community “should not allow this progress to dissipate.”

From the civil society, the Council heard from the Operation Manager of the Fezzan Libya Organisation, Bushra Alhodiri, who spoke about the situation of women in the country.

Alhodiri noted that “more than a decade has passed since the peaceful revolution turned to an armed internal war” and, now, those living in Libya nowadays “struggle to survive, especially women and youth.”

“One of the biggest issues impeding women's participation in politics, preventing gender equality, and marginalizing women's future engagement is women's insecurity in Libya,” the Libyan said.

The leader of the Fezzan Libya Organisation said that “increasing the number of women in public service is an excellent starting point”, but warned that “achieving meaningful participation for women also requires adopting pro-women legislation.”

“It is time for Libyan policymakers and the international community to understand that achieving true democracy, justice, and equality for everyone requires women's significant participation,” Alhodiri said.

Representing Libya, the permanent representative Taher M. T. Elsonni informed that “the political situation is still an impasse and the suffering of our people continues.”

Elsonni also noted the energy crisis and said “the anger of the people is increasing.”
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