IFAD / MAURITANIA DROUGHT

Preview Language:   Original
16-Jun-2022 00:03:06
Three quarters of the world’s population could be affected by droughts by 2050, according to the United Nations. Annual rainfall in some areas of Mauritania has dropped to a quarter of levels recorded 30 years ago. IFAD

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STORY: IFAD / MAURITANIA DROUGHT
TRT: 3:06
SOURCE: IFAD
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: FRENCH/ ARABIC /NATS
DATELINE: 8 - 10 JUNE 2022, GUIDIMAKHA, MAURITANIA
SHOTLIST:
8 JUNE 2022, GHIDIMAKHA, MAURITANIA

1 Various shots, degraded land
2. Close up, soil
3. Wide shot, villagers walking across desert

10 JUNE 2022, MAURITANIA

4. SOUNDBITE (French) Ahmed Ould Amar, Project Manager, IFAD:
“In the southern zone, the main issue is that during the last decade we have faced a phenomenon of shrinking of cultivable areas, why? As it was a zone with strong slopes, the hazards related to the volumes of rainfall cause negative effects on the soil in terms of gullying and in terms of degradation. This had led to a shrinkage of these areas which has resulted in a significant reduction of the production.”
8 JUNE 2022, GHIDIMAKHA, MAURITANIA
5. Wide shot, stone walls in desert/degraded land
6. Wide shot, camel walking across the desert
7. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Zeinebou Mint Mohamed Mahmoud, Farmer:
“We had a problem with irrigation water and we had no fencing against animals who destroyed our crop and we used to work only in the fall and winter seasons.”
8. Med shot, GVS of plants being cultivated
9. Wide shot, irrigation and watering
10. Close up, hose
11. Wide shot, women farmers weeding
12. Close up, woman farmer weeding
13. Wide shot, farmers tilling land on segregated pits
14. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Zeinebou Mint Mohamed Mahmoud, Farmer:
“This project helps us with irrigation machines and water tanks pumps, seeds and fences and bigger water pipes and that helped us with farming and we thank them for that.”
15. Wide shot, farmer packing her produce onions
16. Close up, potatoes
17. Wide shot, vegetable gardens
18. Wide shot, farmer watering crops with hose
19. Various shots, crops

STORYLINE:
Three quarters of the world’s population could be affected by droughts by 2050, according to the United Nations.
But while many parts of the world can expect more droughts in the future, for some areas of Africa, they are already a daily reality. 55 million people are currently directly affected by droughts each year.
In the Sahel, which is currently experiencing a widespread drought, they are having a devastating effect on small-scale farmers and producers causing crops to fail and reducing available farmland.
Annual rainfall in some areas of Mauritania has dropped to a quarter of levels recorded 30 years ago
On the UN’s World Day to Combat Desertification and Drought this year’s theme is "Rising up from drought together", emphasising the need of an early action to avoid disastrous consequences for humanity and the planetary ecosystems.
The UN’s International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) has been trying to find long term solutions for small-scale farmers battling with climate change and helping local farmers overcome water shortages and remain resilient to the devastating effects of climate change.
Water is a rare sight in Mauritania.
The country is known for its deserts and dry climate, but over the past three decades a huge reduction in annual rainfall has led to even more frequent drought periods.
Guidimakha is a region that used to receive significant rainfall up to 1600 mm in the 1990s, now it receives just a quarter of that barely 400mm per year.
Climate change has led to increased areas of desertification, and as a result a huge drop in agricultural production, as most farmers are reliant on rainfed crops. This has left farmers struggling to grow enough food to eat or sell on for income.
SOUNDBITE (French) Ahmed Ould Amar, Project Manager, IFAD:
“In the southern zone, the main issue is that during the last decade we have faced a phenomenon of shrinking of cultivable areas, why? As it was a zone with strong slopes, the hazards related to the volumes of rainfall cause negative effects on the soil in terms of gullying and in terms of degradation. This had led to a shrinkage of these areas which has resulted in a significant reduction of the production.” The degraded soil and lack of water has left farmers unable to grow crops for large periods of the year. This has also led to increased conflict between farmers and animals, as they are both fighting for limited food supplies and water.
SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Zeinebou Mint Mohamed Mahmoud, Farmer:
“We had a problem with irrigation water and we had no fencing against animals who destroyed our crop and we used to work only in the fall and winter seasons.”
Things improved dramatically for her after a local project dug water pits and gave her an irrigation pump so she could easily get the water to her vegetable plot. The project also taught her how to build channels that will make better use of the available water and provided fencing to protect her crops from wildlife.
The project funded by the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) and the Government of Mauritania has given him and local farmers access to a reliable source of water, so they can now farm all year round.
SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Zeinebou Mint Mohamed Mahmoud, Farmer:
“This project helps us with irrigation machines and water tanks pumps, seeds and fences and bigger water pipes and that helped us with farming and we thank them for that.”
Thanks to the project Zeinebou and neighbouring farmers, now don’t have to worry when the rains are coming, but with droughts becoming more frequent here and in other areas of the world, many other small-scale farmers are less fortunate.
2.3 billion people are currently facing water stress around the world causing widespread hunger and hardship for millions of people now and even more in the future. Finding sustainable water solutions that can help feed people like here in Mauritania is more important than ever.
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IFAD
Alternate Title
unifeed220616i
Asset ID
2890841