WHO / MONKEYPOX COVID-19 UPDATE

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08-Jun-2022 00:06:21
WHO chief Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said, "globally, the number of reported COVID-19 cases and deaths continues to decline. This is clearly a very encouraging trend – increasing vaccination rates are saving lives – but WHO continues to urge caution. Globally, there is not enough testing, and not enough vaccination." WHO

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STORY: WHO / MONKEYPOX COVID-19 UPDATE
TRT: 6:21
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 08 JUNE 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

1.Wide shot, press briefing room
2.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
"Globally, the number of reported COVID-19 cases and deaths continues to decline. This is clearly a very encouraging trend – increasing vaccination rates are saving lives – but WHO continues to urge caution. Globally, there is not enough testing, and not enough vaccination."
3.Wide shot, press briefing room
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
"The perception that the pandemic is over is understandable, but misguided. More than 7,000 people lost their lives to this virus last week – that’s 7,000 too many. A new and even more dangerous variant could emerge at any time, and vast numbers of people remain unprotected. The pandemic is not over, and we will keep saying it’s not over until it is."
5. Wide shot, press briefing room
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
"More than 1,000 confirmed cases of monkeypox have now been reported to WHO from 29 countries that are not endemic for the disease. So far, no deaths have been reported in these countries. Cases have been reported mainly, but not only, among men who have sex with men. Some countries are now beginning to report cases of apparent community transmission, including some cases in women. The sudden and unexpected appearance of monkeypox in several non-endemic countries suggests that there might have been undetected transmission for some time. How long, we don’t know. The risk of monkeypox becoming established in non-endemic countries is real. WHO is particularly concerned about the risks of this virus for vulnerable groups including children and pregnant women."
7. Wide shot, press briefing room
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
"WHO urges the affected countries to make every effort to identify all cases and contacts to control this outbreak and prevent onward spread. To support countries, WHO has issued guidance on surveillance and contact tracing, and laboratory testing and diagnosis. In the coming days, we will also issue guidance on clinical care, infection prevention and control, vaccination, and further guidance on community protection."
9. Wide shot, press briefing room
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
"There are effective ways for people to protect themselves and others – people with symptoms should isolate at home and consult a health worker. Those who share a household with an infected person should avoid close contact. There are antivirals and vaccines approved for monkeypox, but these are in limited supply. WHO is developing a coordination mechanism for the distribution of supplies based on public health needs and fairness. WHO does not recommend mass vaccination against monkeypox."
11. Wide shot, press briefing room
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
"It’s clearly concerning that monkeypox is spreading in countries where it has not been seen before. At the same time, we must remember that so far this year there have been more than 1,400 suspected cases of monkeypox in Africa, and 66 deaths. This virus has been circulating and killing in Africa for decades. It’s an unfortunate reflection of the world we live in that the international community is only now paying attention to monkeypox because it has appeared in high-income countries. The communities that live with the threat of this virus every day deserve the same concern, the same care and the same access to tools to protect themselves."
13. Wide shot, press briefing room
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rosamund Lewis, Head, WHO Smallpox Secretariat, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
"So, the primary drivers of onward spread of this virus at the moment in the non-endemic setting are face-to-face, skin-to-skin, interpersonal contact, physical contact. This is how the virus has always been described as transmitting and at the moment this is the primary mode of transmission that we are aware of at this time. As we have said before, there is a lot we still don't know about this new outbreak."
15. Wide shot, press briefing room
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Rosamund Lewis, Head, WHO Smallpox Secretariat, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
"With respect to other modes of transmission, there is a lot again we still don't know and more research needs to be done in this area. In particular, it is important to perhaps appreciate that this skin rash also occurs in the mouth and in mucus membranes. It can occur in the mouth, in the eyes and other mucus membranes around the genital area, for example. And so, anyone who has virus in the mouth can also transmit that virus through, again, close face-to-face contact. For this reason, it is recommended that health workers who are looking after patients or receiving patients with a rash or looking after patients with monkeypox should wear a mask because there is the possibility of transmission through droplets and contacts through close proximity. The same applies for persons who actually have monkeypox to realise, especially if they have leisons in their mouth or on the face, that they are able to transmit them in that way. As to whether there is aerosol transmission, this is still not really known. Clearly if there are aerosol generating procedures that are done in the clinical setting, then this will of course contribute to aerosol spread."
17. Wide shot, press briefing room

STORYLINE:

WHO chief Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said, "globally, the number of reported COVID-19 cases and deaths continues to decline. This is clearly a very encouraging trend – increasing vaccination rates are saving lives – but WHO continues to urge caution. Globally, there is not enough testing, and not enough vaccination."

Speaking to reporters in Geneva today (08 Jun), Tedros said, "the perception that the pandemic is over is understandable, but misguided.”

He explained, “more than 7,000 people lost their lives to this virus last week – that’s 7,000 too many. A new and even more dangerous variant could emerge at any time, and vast numbers of people remain unprotected. The pandemic is not over, and we will keep saying it’s not over until it is."

On monkeypox, WHO’s chief said, "more than 1,000 confirmed cases of monkeypox have now been reported to WHO from 29 countries that are not endemic for the disease. So far, no deaths have been reported in these countries.”

He continued, “cases have been reported mainly, but not only, among men who have sex with men. Some countries are now beginning to report cases of apparent community transmission, including some cases in women.”

Tedros said, “the sudden and unexpected appearance of monkeypox in several non-endemic countries suggests that there might have been undetected transmission for some time. How long, we don’t know. The risk of monkeypox becoming established in non-endemic countries is real. WHO is particularly concerned about the risks of this virus for vulnerable groups including children and pregnant women."

The WHO chief urged the affected countries to “make every effort to identify all cases and contacts to control this outbreak and prevent onward spread. To support countries, WHO has issued guidance on surveillance and contact tracing, and laboratory testing and diagnosis. In the coming days, we will also issue guidance on clinical care, infection prevention and control, vaccination, and further guidance on community protection."

Tedros also said, "there are effective ways for people to protect themselves and others – people with symptoms should isolate at home and consult a health worker. Those who share a household with an infected person should avoid close contact. There are antivirals and vaccines approved for monkeypox, but these are in limited supply.”

He continued, “WHO is developing a coordination mechanism for the distribution of supplies based on public health needs and fairness. WHO does not recommend mass vaccination against monkeypox.”

"It’s clearly concerning that monkeypox is spreading in countries where it has not been seen before. At the same time, we must remember that so far this year there have been more than 1,400 suspected cases of monkeypox in Africa, and 66 deaths,” said Tedros.

He added, “this virus has been circulating and killing in Africa for decades. It’s an unfortunate reflection of the world we live in that the international community is only now paying attention to monkeypox because it has appeared in high-income countries. The communities that live with the threat of this virus every day deserve the same concern, the same care and the same access to tools to protect themselves."

WHO’s Dr Rosamund Lewis said, “the primary drivers of onward spread of this virus at the moment in the non-endemic setting are face-to-face, skin-to-skin, interpersonal contact, physical contact. This is how the virus has always been described as transmitting and at the moment this is the primary mode of transmission that we are aware of at this time. As we have said before, there is a lot we still don't know about this new outbreak."

Lewis added, "with respect to other modes of transmission, there is a lot again we still don't know and more research needs to be done in this area. In particular, it is important to perhaps appreciate that this skin rash also occurs in the mouth and in mucus membranes. It can occur in the mouth, in the eyes and other mucus membranes around the genital area, for example.”

She added, “anyone who has virus in the mouth can also transmit that virus through, again, close face-to-face contact. For this reason, it is recommended that health workers who are looking after patients or receiving patients with a rash or looking after patients with monkeypox should wear a mask because there is the possibility of transmission through droplets and contacts through close proximity. The same applies for persons who actually have monkeypox to realise, especially if they have leisons in their mouth or on the face, that they are able to transmit them in that way. As to whether there is aerosol transmission, this is still not really known. Clearly if there are aerosol generating procedures that are done in the clinical setting, then this will of course contribute to aerosol spread."
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