SOUTH SUDAN / WILDLIFE CONSERVATION

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31-May-2022 00:10:03
Aimed at familiarizing and raising awareness to highlight South Sudan’s potential to harness its natural resources, the aerial visit took the group to the eastern banks of the Nile towards Jonglei and Eastern Equatoria States. UNMISS

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STORY: WILDLIFE CONSERVATION
TRT: 10.03
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH /NATS

DATELINE: 23/24/25/26 MAY 2022, AIR/KURON/TORIT, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

SHOTLIST

24 MAY 2022, IN AIR, SOUTH SUDAN

1. Various shots, delegation inside chopper flight
2. Close up, flight over the river Nile
3. Wide shot, landscape
4. Various, delegation in chopper

24 MAY 2022, EASTERN EQUATORIA STATE, SOUTH SUDAN

5. Various, giraffes in national park

24 MAY 2022, IN AIR, SOUTH SUDAN

6. Various, delegation in chopper

25 MAY 2022, KURON, EASETRN EQUATORIA STATE, SOUTH SUDAN

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Nicholas Haysom, United Nations Mission in South Sudan Special Representative of the Secretary General:
“We are convinced that having looked at both the landscape and the wildlife resources that we have seen here potentially abundant wildlife resources, that investing in wildlife is not in place of investing in people, it is part of investing in people. And in the South Sudan context, the development of a wildlife sector and its conservation could mean investment for the country, it could mean livelihoods for the youth, it could mean a development and consolidation of peace, and so on all of those grounds we think it is an important area that government should support, and that the international community should support.”
8. Various, mountain ranges
9. Various, delegation inside chopper looking out

25 MAY 2022, KURON, EASETRN EQUATORIA STATE, SOUTH SUDAN

10. Tracking, inside vehicle driving
11. Various, traditional dancers
12. Various, delegation shaking hands with local authority/chief

26 MAY 2022, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

13. SOUNDBITE (English) Phillip Winter, Wildlife Conservationist:
“There's been very little investment in conservation in South Sudan since the 1970s and that investment stopped when the fighting started again in 1983 and I felt for a long time like a lone voice saying to people please don't abandon or forget the parks and reserves and the wildlife itself you don't there may have been horrendous problems for human beings but in the future if they can at least preserve and protect the parks and reserves we know from other countries in Africa that wildlife will come back after a war.”

23 MAY 2022, IN AIR, JONGLEI, SOUTH SUDAN

14. Aerial shot, Kob
15. Aerial shot, Sudd

26 MAY 2022, JUBA SOUTH SUDAN

16. SOUNDBITE (English) Phillip Winter, Wildlife Conservationist:
“A typical modern investment in conservation starts with getting the green light from the government which number of organizations are beginning to get and then it has to continue with what we always call the community that's a rather overused word but of course it means the people who live around nearby and will be affected by any kind of rules and regulations about parks. If you don't have the goodwill and support of the community your program will fail.”

25 MAY 2022, KURON, SOUTH SUDAN

17. Various shots, meeting at Peace Village
18. Med shot, Phillip Winter, Wildlife Conservationist

25 MAY 2022, KURON SOUTH SUDAN
19. SOUNDBITE (English) Nicholas Haysom, United Nations Mission in South Sudan Special Representative of the Secretary General:
“The first thing is to make sure that the development conservation and management of wildlife is done on behalf of the community and with the community so we would want to insist that affected wildlife programs take place where the community feels they are a part of the solution and the beneficiary of this resource. Secondly what has been apparent to us flying across this vast area is that there is a considerable resource in the land which is unutilized and there shouldn't be a question of animals competing for land the land is available it's a question of establishing the necessary infrastructure to protect the wildlife and to make use of it.”

25 MAY 2022, IN AIR, EASTERN EQUATORIA STATE, SOUTH SUDAN

20. More of Mountain ranges

24 MAY 2022, TORIT, EASTERN EQUATORIA STATE, SOUTH SUDAN

21. Various of meeting with Governor
22. SOUNDBITE (English) Louis Lobong, Governor of Eastern Equatoria State, South Sudan:
“The State welcomes very much the idea, and idea is if it is implemented will definitely bring about sustainable peace between the communities, sustainable peace between the wildlife and people, sustainable peace within the cattle [camps] and the cattle keepers, because they will have something benefiting them both, and it would also create employment for the youth. The youth instead of raiding they will embark in development [efforts] and [this] will create jobs for them.”
23. Various, group discussing areas on map
24. SOUNDBITE (English) Louis Lobong, Governor of Eastern Equatoria State, South Sudan:
“We very much appreciate the idea and that we in Eastern Equatorial will definitely support and look forward for the donor community to support this program in Eastern Equatoria, and we also continue to mobilize the citizens – and to agree on buy the idea of Wildlife Conservation it means to stop killing the wildlife and work with partners that will come and implement the program.”

25 MAY 2022, IN AIR, CENTRAL EQUATORIA STATE, SOUTH SUDAN

26. Med shot, from cockpit, pilots in flight

26 MAY 2022, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

27. Soundbite (ENGLISH) Phillip Winter, Wildlife Conservationist:
“Everywhere where there's been conflict and conservation organizations have made an investment, they have to some extent been able to stabilize the local security situation because they have trained rangers with weapons moving around who have vehicles and they have fuel and they have radio equipment and they will have wardens who have access to planes that means they can police the park but in policing a park you secure the neighborhood. So you can't call it stabilization on a national level but it becomes in effect a form of stabilization on a local level. So the good news is that conservation itself should help the development of a more secure environment for everybody.”

25 MAY 2022, EASTERN EQUATORIA STATE, SOUTH SUDAN

28. Various, animals in National Park

STORYLINE:

Aimed at familiarizing and raising awareness to highlight South Sudan’s potential to harness its natural resources, the aerial visit took the group to the eastern banks of the Nile towards Jonglei and Eastern Equatoria States.

The visit was co-led by the head of the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) Nicholas Haysom and wildlife conservationist Phillip Winter, and included a section of the diplomatic community,

The effort is part of a broader peacebuilding effort in a country challenged with overall insecurity - a result of years of conflict.

A peace agreement in place offers various opportunities to tap into this wildlife and conservation effort, which UNMISS hopes will prioritize the potential for developing South Sudan’s wildlife resources, manage and utilize them for the benefit of the people.

Nicholas Haysom, United Nations Mission in South Sudan Special Representative of the Secretary General, said “we are convinced that having looked at both the landscape and the wildlife resources that we have seen here potentially abundant wildlife resources, that investing in wildlife is not in place of investing in people, it is part of investing in people. And in the South Sudan context, the development of a wildlife sector and its conservation could mean investment for the country, it could mean livelihoods for the youth, it could mean a development and consolidation of peace, and so on all of those grounds we think it is an important area that government should support and that the international community should support.”

South Sudan has six national parks and 14 protected areas, which conservationists say makes 14 percent of what is protected in some way as a park, reserve or forest reserve.

It is estimated that at least 200 million dollars is needed for 20 years, to boost wildlife conservation efforts, which could give rise to thriving tourism sector.

Phillip Winter, a Wildlife Conservationist, said, “there's been very little investment in conservation in South Sudan since the 1970s and that investment stopped when the fighting started again in 1983 and I felt for a long time like a lone voice saying to people please don't abandon or forget the parks and reserves and the wildlife itself you don't there may have been horrendous problems for human beings but in the future if they can at least preserve and protect the parks and reserves we know from other countries in Africa that wildlife will come back after a war.”

His first visit to the country was in 1975 and where he witnessed large animal populations and migrations, and a return of these exact numbers may be impossible to achieve.

For Winter, “a typical modern investment in conservation starts with getting the green light from the government which number of organizations are beginning to get and then it has to continue with what we always call the community that's a rather overused word but of course it means the people who live around nearby and will be affected by any kind of rules and regulations about parks. If you don't have the goodwill and support of the community your program will fail.”

His raising of awareness amongst various groups is bearing fruit.

Nicholas Haysom, United Nations Mission in South Sudan Special Representative of the Secretary General, said “the first thing is to make sure that the development conservation and management of wildlife is done on behalf of the community and with the community so we would want to insist that affected wildlife programs take place where the community feels they are a part of the solution and the beneficiary of this resource.”

“Secondly what has been apparent to us flying across this vast area is that there is a considerable resource in the land which is unutilized and there shouldn't be a question of animals competing for land the land is available it's a question of establishing the necessary infrastructure to protect the wildlife and to make use of it,” Haysom added.

Eastern Equatoria State has the larger area of parks and reserves which include a range of mountains, and a touch-down in the state capital Torit, saw various engagements with State officials.

Louis Lobong, Governor of Eastern Equatoria State, said that “the State welcomes very much the idea, and idea is if it is implemented will definitely bring about sustainable peace between the communities, sustainable peace between the wildlife and people, sustainable peace within the cattle [camps] and the cattle keepers, because they will have something benefiting them both, and it would also create employment for the youth.”

The state which has recently witnessed tensions – a result of cattle thefts, is in dire need of an improved economy and an awareness on the importance of wildlife conservation.

Louis Lobong, Governor of Eastern Equatoria State, said his government “very much appreciate the idea and that we in Eastern Equatorial will definitely support and look forward for the donor community to support this program in Eastern Equatoria, and we also continue to mobilize the citizens – and to agree on buy the idea of Wildlife Conservation it means to stop killing the wildlife and work with partners that will come and implement the program.”

Winter hopes that South Sudanese will one day through tourism enjoy their wildlife by going to their national parks to see different animal species like giraffes, lions, elephants, antelopes, gazelles, reedbucks, kob, and various migrations conservationists have witnessed,

For the Wildlife Conservationist, “Everywhere where there's been conflict and conservation organizations have made an investment, they have to some extent been able to stabilize the local security situation because they have trained rangers with weapons moving around who have vehicles and they have fuel and they have radio equipment and they will have wardens who have access to planes that means they can police the park but in policing a park you secure the neighborhood.”

“So you can't call it stabilization on a national level but it becomes in effect a form of stabilization on a local level. So the good news is that conservation itself should help the development of a more secure environment for everybody,” Winter said.

The three-day visit covered some areas in Jonglei and Eastern Equatoria States.
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