UN / TECHNOLOGY PEACE AND SECURITY

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23-May-2022 00:04:19
The UN top political affairs official and two experts told the Security Council how new technologies are affecting the international peace and security situation and how the UN can respond to the situation. UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / TECHNOLOGY PEACE AND SECURITY
TRT: 4:19
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 23 MAY 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY
1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations
23 MAY 2022, NEW YORK CITY
2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary DiCarlo, Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations:
“The number of State- and non-State- sponsored incidents of malicious use of digital technologies for political or military ends has nearly quadrupled since 2015, according to some estimates. Of specific concern is activity targeting infrastructure that provides essential public services, such as health and humanitarian agencies.”
4.Wide shot, Security Council
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary DiCarlo, Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations:
“As the Secretary-General has made clear, machines with the power and discretion to take lives without human involvement are politically unacceptable, morally repugnant, and should be prohibited by international law.”
6. Wide shot, Security Council
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary DiCarlo, Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations:
“Non-state actors are becoming increasingly adept at using low-cost and widely available digital technologies to pursue their agendas. Groups such as ISIL and Al-Qaida remain active on social media, using platforms and messaging applications to share information and communicate with followers for the purposes of recruitment, planning and fundraising. The increasing availability of digital payment methods such as cryptocurrencies brings additional challenges.”
8. Med shot, Security Council
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary DiCarlo, Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations:
“Digital technologies have raised major human rights concerns, from artificial intelligence systems that may be discriminatory to the widespread availability of surveillance technologies that can be deployed to target communities or individuals. We are also concerned about the increasing use of internet shutdowns, including in situations of active conflict, which deprive communities of their means of communication, work, and political participation.”
10. Close up, Security Council president
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Nanjala Nyabola, Director of Advox, the Digital Rights Project of Global Voices:
“The UN must continue to use its unparalleled convening power to foster deliberation and rally support for the preservation of the internet as a global public good. The UN can use its agenda setting power to ensure that human rights are embedded retroactively and proactively in the digital technologies that we build and use. The UN can use its norm setting power to foster agreement on the human rights standards that would make a free, safe and just digital future possible not just for this and for future generations.”
12. Wide shot, Security Council
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Nanjala Nyabola, Director of Advox, the Digital Rights Project of Global Voices:
“At this moment we are collectively on a trajectory towards an unjust digital future, but a different and more just path is possible, and this Council has an opportunity to move us closer towards that better future.”
14. Close up, Security Council president
15. SOUNDBITE (English) Dirk Druet, Adjunct Professor at McGill University Center for International Peace and Security Studies and Non-resident Fellow at the International Peace Institute:
“Digital technologies are increasingly an important arena for the protection or deprivation of human rights in conflict settings. In Afghanistan, civilians have spoken about the impact of the ever-present hum of unmanned aerial systems on their mental health, while in Myanmar the military junta has used its control over the internet to target opponents of the 2021 coup d’état and limit their ability to communicate and organize. During the migrant crisis brought about by the conflict in Syria, and more recently in the conflict in Ukraine, serious questions around informed consent for the collection and management of biometric data, including by UN humanitarian actors, have come to the fore.”
16. Wide shot, Security Council
17. SOUNDBITE (English) Dirk Druet, Adjunct Professor at McGill University Center for International Peace and Security Studies and Non-resident Fellow at the International Peace Institute:
“The UN should take on a more explicit and deliberate role as an information actor in conflict environments. Access to accurate information can increasingly be considered as a human right in situations of information warfare, and the UN has a role in truth telling, and as a conduit for reliable information. And I should point out that this is a role un missions have played for many years within the mechanisms of peace processes, for example through ceasefire monitoring.”
18. Wide shot, Security Council
RECENT – NEW YORK CITY
19. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations

STORYLINE:

The UN top political affairs official and two experts told the Security Council how new technologies are affecting the international peace and security situation and how the UN can respond to the situation.

Addressing the Council on Monday (23 May), the Under-Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, Rosemary DiCarlo, noted the number of State- and non-State- sponsored incidents of malicious use of digital technologies for political or military ends has nearly quadrupled since 2015.

For DiCarlo, “of specific concern is activity targeting infrastructure that provides essential public services, such as health and humanitarian agencies.”

About the issue of lethal autonomous weapons, DiCarlo remembered the words of the Secretary-General, saying that “machines with the power and discretion to take lives without human involvement are politically unacceptable, morally repugnant, and should be prohibited by international law.”

The UN political affairs chief also informed that “non-state actors are becoming increasingly adept at using low-cost and widely available digital technologies to pursue their agendas.”

“Groups such as ISIL and Al-Qaida remain active on social media, using platforms and messaging applications to share information and communicate with followers for the purposes of recruitment, planning and fundraising,” DiCarlo said.

According to Under-Secretary-General, the increasing availability of digital payment methods such as cryptocurrencies brings additional challenges

In terms of human rights, DiCarlo noted “major concerns” including artificial intelligence systems that may be discriminatory and the increasing use of internet shutdowns.

From the civil society, Council members heard a briefing coming from the Director of Advox, the Digital Rights Project of Global Voices, Nanjala Nyabola.

The expert said the UN “must continue to use its unparalleled convening power to foster deliberation and rally support for the preservation of the internet as a global public good.”

According to Nyabola, the Organization can also “use its agenda setting power to ensure that human rights are embedded retroactively and proactively in the digital technologies that we build and use.”

The Director of Vox also urged the UN to use “its norm setting power to foster agreement on the human rights standards that would make a free, safe and just digital future possible not just for this and for future generations.”

“At this moment we are collectively on a trajectory towards an unjust digital future, but a different and more just path is possible, and this Council has an opportunity to move us closer towards that better future,” Nyabola concluded.

Also from the civil society, the Council heard from Dirk Druet, an Adjunct Professor at McGill University Center for International Peace and Security Studies and a Non-resident Fellow at the International Peace Institute.

The expert shared several examples of how digital technologies are “increasingly an important arena for the protection or deprivation of human rights in conflict settings.”

In Afghanistan, Druet said, “civilians have spoken about the impact of the ever-present hum of unmanned aerial systems on their mental health, while in Myanmar the military junta has used its control over the internet to target opponents of the 2021 coup d’état and limit their ability to communicate and organize.”

The Professor also noted “serious questions around informed consent for the collection and management of biometric data, including by UN humanitarian actors” that have come to the fore during the migrant crisis caused by the conflict in Syria and more recently in Ukraine.

Druet said the UN “should take on a more explicit and deliberate role as an information actor in conflict environments.”

Noting how “access to accurate information can increasingly be Considered as a human right in situations of information warfare”, the expert added that “the UN has a role in truth telling, and as a conduit for reliable information.”
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