UNAIDS / BERLIN UKRAINIAN REFUGEES HIV

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20-May-2022 00:03:25
More than 600,000 Ukrainian refugees arrived in Germany since the war broke out. Among them many people living with HIV, mostly women. UNAIDS estimates that 260,000 Ukrainians live with HIV. Up to 30,000 fled their country since the start of the war and need HIV treatment. UNAIDS

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STORY: UNAIDS / BERLIN UKRAINIAN REFUGEES HIV
TRT: 03:25
SOURCE: UNAIDS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / RUSSIAN / NATS

DATELINE: MAY 2022, BERLIN, GERMANY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

MAY 2022, BERLIN, GERMANY

1. Wide shot, city view
2. Wide shot, Berlin landmark
3. Med shot, housing complex
4. Various shots, bikers in city
5. Wide shot, people walking in street
6. Wide shot, Vasilisa Sutushko, Ukrainian refugee living with HIV, founder of Teens Ukraine (NGO who helps young people living with HIV) walking to bedroom night table
7. Close up, Vasilisa opening drawer and taking out box of HIV medicine (anti-retroviral therapy ARVs)
8. Close up, box of medicine (a person living with HIV needs to take treatment daily to keep virus at bay to live a healthy life.)
9. Med shot, Vasilisa checking her phone
10. Wide shot, Vasilisa walking out of her temporary home in Berlin
11. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Vasilisa Sutushko, NGO, Teens Ukraine:
“I got these pills for €10 for three months. When I came to Berlin, I had to understand whether I received medicine (ARV therapy) for myself here for free or for a fee. But in principle, unlike Ukraine, the only thing here in Berlin is that like almost all medicines here, they are issued by prescription. In Ukraine, I can get any pills I need without any problems at the pharmacy.”

FILE - MARCH 2022, BERLIN, GERMANY

12. Various shots, Ukrainian Refugees arriving to Berlin via train

MAY 2022, BERLIN, GERMANY

13. Tracking shot, Sergiu Grimalschi, Berliner AIDS Hilfe, Migration Consultant, arriving at the NGO (Germany’s oldest HIV organization)
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Sergiu Grimalschi, Migration consultant Berliner Aids-Hilfe:
“In Berlin, we have many doctors who can help, so the medical part was not the biggest problem, but the accommodation was in the first weeks a big problem, and after that we started to have people who not only needed HIV medicine, but also opioid substitution and other medicine, and we started to have people with big psychological problems.”
15. Wide shot, Sergiu in his office
16. Med shot, Sergiu at his desk
17. Pan left, Sergiu and work colleague
18. Close up, Sergiu face
19. Med shot, Sergiu on the phone
20. Wide shot Ukrainian refugees living with HIV at a meeting at the Berliner AIDS Hilfe office outdoors (some faces blurred to respect people’s privacy)
21. Med shot, Sergiu and Vasilisa
22. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Vasilisa Sutushko, NGO, Teens Ukraine:
“Our organization, TEENS Ukraine, for example, we are trying to organize here, trying to help each other in this. And I'm happy to see people like me here who need help, I can also be helpful.”
23. Wide shot, HIV pamphlets
24. Close up, Berliner AIDS Hilfe flyer
25. Close up, HIV prevention booklets in German

STORYLINE:

More than 600,000 Ukrainian refugees arrived in Germany since the war broke out. Among them many people living with HIV, mostly women. UNAIDS estimates that 260,000 Ukrainians live with HIV. Up to 30,000 fled their country since the start of the war and need HIV treatment.

In the beginning many needed to find shelter and then there were lots of requests about obtaining HIV treatment. Many refugees had left their supply behind or took the bare minimum.

Vasilisa Sutushko, who was born with HIV, arrived in Berlin at the beginning of March with one month worth of pills She also had no clue navigating the German health system. A local NGO, Berliner AIDS Hilfe, one of Germany’s oldest HIV organizations, was flooded with an influx of calls for help. They helped her and countless others with medicine, housing, and other pressing health issues.

According to Berliner AIDS Hilfe, most of the refugees living with HIV won’t be able to go back until the bombed medical facilities are rebuilt.

Vasilisa and others are now trying to set up a network to further help people living with HIV. In Ukraine, she founded Teens Ukraine, an NGO for youth living with HIV, to help them overcome barriers like accessing treatment and health care. Stigma and discrimination in Ukraine regarding one’s HIV status have made many refugees hesitant about seeking help or open about living with HIV in their adopted countries.

Interrupting treatment, even temporarily, can lead to drug resistance and increased risk of progression to AIDS.
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UNAIDS
Alternate Title
unifeed220520f
Asset ID
2878205