WHO / UKRAINE CHILD IMMUNIZATION

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27-Apr-2022 00:03:05
With the ongoing war leading to severe disruptions to the Ukrainian health system including routine immunizations, WHO is seriously concerned about a potential measles outbreak, which could have devastating health consequences. WHO

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STORY: WHO / UKRAINE CHILD IMMUNIZATION
TRT: 3:05
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT WHO ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: UKRAINIAN / RUSSIAN / NATS

DATELINE: 26 APRIL 2022, RIVNE OBLAST, UKRAINE

SHOTLIST:

1. Various shots, 27-year-old Ukrainian mother, Yevheniia, with her child during medical check-up with pediatrician, Dr. Vitaliia Ihorivna
2. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Yevheniia, 27-year-old Ukrainian mother:
“My name is Yevheniia, I’m 27. I'm, well, actually I'm a salesman by profession, but now I'm on maternity leave with a small child. I’m from Luhansk region. We got DPT and the polio vaccine as we couldn't do it at two months old. The nurse came to the hostel and told me that we could get vaccinated. I recommend that my loved ones get vaccinated, as (this) protects the immune system, strengthens (it).”
3. Med shot, Yevheniia waiting with her child as healthcare worker prepares vaccine
shot
4. Close shot, syringes and vaccine in tray
5. Close shot, syringe being filled with vaccine
6. Med shot, healthcare worker vaccinating Yevheniia’s child
7. Med shot, Yevheniia receiving vaccination certificate
8. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Dr. Vitaliia Ihorivna, Pediatrician:
“My name is Vitaliia Ihorivna, I’m a pediatrician at the primary care center. We vaccinated internally displaced persons, have done about 20 preventive vaccinations. Of course, not everyone comes for help, but there were children and most of them were children under one year old. These were mostly preventive vaccinations for children, without any calendar violations. I can say that the immunization decreased a bit, because at first there was panic, people left en masse and the number of vaccinations at first decreased a bit. But now we
have restored it, we continue doing preventive vaccinations. I think the war has now affected everyone and also the work of all health workers.”
9. Various shots, Ihorivna during consultation with a mother and her child
10. Close shot, syringes and vaccine on table (MUTE)
11. Close shot, syringe bring filled with vaccine
12. Close shot, vaccine being administered to child
13. Med shot, child being given plastic bottle to comfort him
14. Med shot, healthcare worker saying goodbye to child
15. Med shot, mother hugging her child
16. Med shot, healthcare worker showing WHO worker a vaccine
17. Close shot, healthcare worker holding up vaccine
18. Various shots, healthcare worker vaccinating child

STORYLINE:

According to the latest data available, 85 percent of eligible children in Ukraine received their first dose of measles vaccine in 2020. While this was a significant improvement compared to the low of 42 percent in 2016 and a major achievement for the country, WHO recommends vaccine coverage of 95 percent or higher each year to achieve and maintain herd immunity and protect the population. With the ongoing war leading to severe disruptions to the Ukrainian health system including routine immunizations, WHO is seriously concerned about a potential measles outbreak, which could have devastating health consequences.

SOUNDBITE (Russian) Yevheniia, 27-year-old Ukrainian mother:
“My name is Yevheniia, I’m 27. I'm, well, actually I'm a salesman by profession, but now I'm on maternity leave with a small child. I’m from Luhansk region. We got DPT and the polio vaccine as we couldn't do it at two months old. The nurse came to the hostel and told me that we could get vaccinated. I recommend that my loved ones get vaccinated, as (this) protects the immune system, strengthens (it).”

There are immunization gaps among children, adolescents, and adults in Ukraine. These gaps led to measles outbreaks in 2012 and then again from mid-2017 to the end of 2019, when Ukraine had the second largest measles outbreak reported globally. Thanks to the efforts of the health authorities, an aggressive immunization response helped control the outbreak in 2019 and bring infection rates down, but overall population immunity remains low.

Dr. Vitaliia Ihorivna is a pediatrician providing immunizations for children at a repurposed technical college that is now housing internally displaced people.

SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Dr. Vitaliia Ihorivna, Pediatrician:
“We vaccinated internally displaced persons, have done about 20 preventive vaccinations. Of course, not everyone comes for help, but there were children and most of them were children under one year old. These were mostly preventive vaccinations for children, without any calendar violations. I can say that the immunization decreased a bit, because at first there was panic, people left en masse and the number of vaccinations at first decreased a bit. But now we have restored it, we continue doing preventive vaccinations. I think the war has now affected everyone and also the work of all health workers.”

WHO is also concerned and is closely monitoring an outbreak of vaccine-derived poliovirus type 2 in Ukraine. To date two children with acute flaccid paralysis (AFP) have tested positive for polio, and the virus has also been detected in 19 asymptomatic contacts. A nationwide polio vaccination campaign to provide inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) to approximately 140,000 children aged 6 months to 6 years who had not received any previous doses was disrupted just weeks after its launch on 1 February this year. The campaign has since resumed where possible, with just 48 percent (approximately 69,000) of the targeted children vaccinated as of 24 April.

WHO is doing everything possible to support the Ukrainian health authorities to reach high- risk groups, while bringing in additional vaccine supplies as required.
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