SOUTH SUDAN / MALAKAL HUMANITARIAN SITUATION

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27-Apr-2022 00:06:43
UN Humanitarian Coordinator Sara Beysolow Nyanti led a high-level delegation to Malakal, in South Sudan’s Upper Nile State, to assess needs on the ground and to meet with people affected by ongoing violence and natural disasters. UNMISS

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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / MALAKAL HUMANITARIAN SITUATION
TRT: 06:43
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / ARABIC / NATS

DATELINE: 23 APRIL 2022, MALAKAL, SOUTH SUDAN

SHOTLIST:
1. Various shots, UN delegation, local staff, exterior
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Sara Beysolow Nyati, Humanitarian Coordinator and Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS):
“We have come to Malakal with one objective, and that is to assess the humanitarian situation, to observe ourselves the context within which our humanitarian actors are working, to be able to identify ourselves any gaps we have in the implementation of humanitarian objectives in Malakal.”
3. Various shots, local population, IDPs, UN delegation, local staff, camp, exterior
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Sara Beysolow Nyati, Humanitarian Coordinator and Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS):
“Now, we try to bring the three pieces together. Now, this was a very important mission in relation to that and what I see going forward is that we have to switch some of the things we do. I would like to see us to do some shifts in terms of the localization of our activities, working more with local NGOs but also then with cash, doing more with cash and cash-based initiatives.”
5. Various shots, UN delegation, local staff, interior
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Peter Riek Dak, Acting Governor, Upper Nile State:
“It’s just something that we can’t deny, and we really appreciated that, and also, we are encouraging you to do more. We are not leaving it to you alone then. We can share it together. So, we still need your support.”
7. Various shots, IDPs sitting
8. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Martha Steven, Representative for women living in the protection of civilians site in Malakal
“We women don’t have jobs that can support us financially. We face a lot of challenges that make us go out to collect firewood that we can use and sell. Sometimes when you meet a drunk soldier, he may beat or rape you.”
9. Various shots, local youth leaders, children, IDP camp
10. SOUNDBITE (Arabic) Kadila Mayongo, Youth Representative
“Most youth, since 2013 to date, have not had the opportunity to go to university or any higher institution of learning. Their families can’t afford to pay the fees. We request that organizations set up at least a vocational training centre; that would be great for us young people.”
11. Various shots, camp chairperson, locals
STORYLINE:
UN Humanitarian Coordinator Sara Beysolow Nyanti led a high-level delegation to Malakal, in South Sudan’s Upper Nile State, to assess needs on the ground and to meet with people affected by ongoing violence and natural disasters.

In Upper Nile State, armed conflict and insecurity make civilians flee their homes, increasing humanitarian needs.

The Malakal protection of civilians site is still receiving new arrivals, consisting of people leaving both flooded areas and violence behind.

Humanitarian actors call on the government, development partners, and donors to match their solidarity by showing their unwavering support to the people affected by unforgiving circumstances on the ground.

Humanitarian access and the delivery of essential services, including health care, education, water, sanitation, protection, and legal services, remain challenges.

Continued sub-national conflicts and instability in parts of South Sudan have resulted in a large-scale internal displacement of people. The long-standing economic crisis in the country is affecting people’s ability to access markets, while outbursts of violence are limiting the flow of commercial and humanitarian goods and services.

“What I see going forward is that we have to switch some of the things we do. I would like to see us to do some shifts in terms of the localization of our activities, working more with local NGOs but also then with cash, doing more with cash and cash-based initiatives,” said Sara Beysolow Nyati, Humanitarian Coordinator and Deputy Special Representative of the Secretary-General for the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS).

This year, some 6.8 million of the most vulnerable people in South Sudan will need urgent life-saving assistance and protection. A $1.7 billion humanitarian response plan for the country is currently only around eight percent funded.
Chronically dysfunctional public services further add to the daunting problems.

Insecurity in Upper Nile State exposes vulnerable people, particularly women, to severe risks of physical harm, not least when they leave the relative safety of their homes to collect firewood. Internally displaced women seem to be particularly susceptible to being attacked.

Martha Steven, Representative for women living in the protection of civilians site in Malakal, said, “We women don’t have jobs that can support us financially. We face a lot of challenges that make us go out to collect firewood that we can use and sell. Sometimes when you meet a drunk soldier, he may beat or rape you.”

Education facilities, critical for the developmental needs of children and adolescents, are also in short supply.

Kadila Mayongo, Youth Representative in Malakal, said that “most youth, since 2013 to date, have not had the opportunity to go to university or any higher institution of learning. Their families can’t afford to pay the fees. We request that organizations set up at least a vocational training centre; that would be great for us young people.”
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UNMISS
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unifeed220427a
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2732071