SOUTH SUDAN / MAGWI CLASHES

Preview Language:   Original
22-Apr-2022 00:04:44
According to the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), Magwi’s resident farming community has been at the epicenter of conflict with semi-nomadic animal herders. UNMISS

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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / MAGWI CLASHES
TRT: 04:44
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: MADI / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 19 APRIL 2022, MAGWI, SOUTH SUDAN

SHOTLIST:
1. Various shots, people attending a rally
2. SOUNDBITE (Madi) Anyek Rose, local women representative:
“Many bad things happened when cattle herders brought conflict to us. We have people who were killed, among them women. Now we have a four-month-old child whose mother was killed. Secondly, our women have been sexually abused in the bushes, more than 20 of them were raped, and now their husbands have abandoned them. Can the Government take care of these women? If the Government wants us in Magwi County to reconcile and stay in peace, they must do something good that we can see.”
3. Various shots, local community
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Deng Dau Deng, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs, South Sudan:
“The cattle came and caused problems in your own community here, and it has damaged our image as a country. Because of this reason, our President has directed all the cattle camps in Eastern Equatoria, in Central Equatoria, to move back to Jonglei and move back to Lakes State. So, I want to say our condolences to people who have lost their lives, and we are sorry about the destruction of properties that happened here. The herders must move back to their counties and states.”
5. Various shots, local women, UNMISS staff
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Hazel De Wet, Director of Civil Affairs, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS):
“We are seeking opportunities and how best we can engage the different communities to see what actions we can undertake to strengthen the issues around peacebuilding, allowing different communities, especially your pastoralists and your farmer communities, to see what it is that they can live with each other in the same area in peace and harmony and, therefore, prevent any and all factual incidents of violence that can occur. From us, in UNMISS, we agreed to support them in civil-military dialogue. That means bringing together the security organs in the state and the civil population so that they can engage and understand their respective responsibilities and obligations to ensure that everyone lives in safety and harmony.”
5. Aerial shots, landscape

STORYLINE:
According to the United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS), Magwi’s resident farming community has been at the epicenter of conflict with semi-nomadic animal herders.

A delegation from UNMISS, UN agencies, and the national Government recently visited the troubled areas to assess the situation of the communities affected by the loss of lives, sexual violence, mass displacement of civilians, and the destruction of properties and crops. The delegation met with county authorities, the state Governor, youth representatives, and other key stakeholders.

As a result of skirmishes between host communities and herders, 130 people have been reported killed, and more than 20 women have been raped. Initially, some 14,000 people sought refuge in Magwi central Payam, while another estimated 1,000 faced dire humanitarian shortages in Ayii. Some have returned home, but tensions and fear remain.

Following this rapid deterioration of the security situation, UNMISS rallied its peacekeepers and stepped up its presence in and around the area. Since then, Blue Helmets have continued engaging with local communities, authorities, and government partners to find ways to restore calm and stability, not least by removing the destructive cattle and their owners from farmlands.

SOUNDBITE (Madi) Anyek Rose, local women representative:
“Many bad things happened when cattle herders brought conflict to us. We have people who were killed, among them women. Now we have a four-month-old child whose mother was killed. Secondly, our women have been sexually abused in the bushes, more than 20 of them were raped, and now their husbands have abandoned them. Can the Government take care of these women? If the Government wants us in Magwi County to reconcile and stay in peace, they must do something good that we can see.”

Serious discord began when hungry animals began grazing uncontrollably on farmlands, destroying precious food crops. The ensuing violence is reported to have claimed 130 lives and the initial displacement of more than 14,000 persons. At least twenty women have been raped, and properties have been destroyed. While some people have come back home, tensions remain, and many are too afraid to return.

The State Government initially spearheaded initiatives to relocate cattle herders away from farmlands before returning to their states, but now the national Government has promised to intervene to restore calm and enable displaced persons to resume their previous lives.

SOUNDBITE (English) Deng Dau Deng, Deputy Minister of Foreign Affairs, South Sudan:
“The cattle came and caused problems in your own community here, and it has damaged our image as a country. Because of this reason, our President has directed all the cattle camps in Eastern Equatoria, in Central Equatoria, to move back to Jonglei and move back to Lakes State. So, I want to say our condolences to people who have lost their lives, and we are sorry about the destruction of properties that happened here. The herders must move back to their counties and states.”

The UN peacekeeping mission in the country is committed to supporting any initiatives that can bring back peace to the people of Magwi County.

SOUNDBITE (English) Hazel De Wet, Director of Civil Affairs, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS):
“We are seeking opportunities and how best we can engage the different communities to see what actions we can undertake to strengthen the issues around peacebuilding, allowing different communities, especially your pastoralists and your farmer communities, to see what it is that they can live with each other in the same area in peace and harmony and, therefore, prevent any and all factual incidents of violence that can occur. From us, in UNMISS, we agreed to support them in civil-military dialogue. That means bringing together the security organs in the state and the civil population so that they can engage and understand their respective responsibilities and obligations to ensure that everyone lives in safety and harmony.”
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unifeed220422e
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2730915