SOMALILAND / HARGEISA FIRE ASSESSMENT

Preview Language:   Original
11-Apr-2022 00:07:35
In response to the destruction caused by a blaze in Hargeisa, in Somaliland, the United Nations deployed an inter-agency team of technical experts to work with the government and the response committee to assess the damage and support the rebuilding of a marketplace. UNSOM

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STORY: SOMALILAND / HARGEISA FIRE ASSESSMENT
TRT: 7:35
SOURCE: UNSOM
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT UNSOM ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: SOMALI / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 09 APRIL 2022, HARGEISA, SOMALILAND

SHOTLIST:

1. Med shot, destroyed shops at the Waheen market in Hargeisa
2. Wide shot, burning items
3. Tilt up shot,clothes burning
4. Close up, a section of a shop that got destroyed in the fire
5. Med shot, clothing items that got burnt
6. Close up, Zainab Hassan Warsame, looking at the ashes of her shop
7. Close up shot, destroyed bales of clothes
8. Med shot, Zainab Hassan Warsame
9. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Zainab Hassan Warsame:
“My boutique used to stock clothes. I used to sell all types of clothes. It was a big boutique. I used to feed my elderly parents, my children, as well as my daughters’ children – in total, ten people’s livelihoods depended on my business. I was the only breadwinner for my family and they depended on this boutique, but it is no more.”
10. Med shot, businessman Mohamed Abdullahi Muhamoud looks around smouldering ruins.
11. Close up, smoke
12. Close up, businessman Mohamed Abdullahi Muhamoud
13. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Mohamed Abdullahi Muhamoud:
“My business used to feed my entire family… this business sustained many members of my family whose livelihoods directly depended on it. Today, as you can see, it’s completely destroyed,”
14. Tilt up shot, a burnt down building
15. Pan shot, burnt shops
16. Wide shot, a victim of the fire going through the rubble of her burnt shops
17. Close up, a tin of cream
18. Med shot, another fire victim looking at the remains of his shop
19. Wide shot, part of Waheen market that was destroyed by fire
20. Med shot, aplane landing at Egal International Airport, Hargeisa, with officials of UN agencies, the UN Development Programme (UNDP), UN-Habitat, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the International Labour Organization (ILO), UN Women, the World Health Organization (WHO), the UN Capital Development Fund (UNCDF), the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and the UN Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM)
21. Wide shot, Egal International airport, Hargeisa
22. Close up, Somaliland flag
23. Med shot, plane
24. Wide shot, UN inter-agency team on arrival.
25. Med shot, the delegation walking.
26. SOUNDBITE (English) Jacqueline Saline Olweya, the UNDP Deputy Resident Representative for Somalia:
“The team has experts in environmental issues, legal issues, communication issues and, more importantly, socio-economic as well as health issues, that will be working with the response committee to try to establish what areas need to be responded to.”
27. Wide shot, the UN inter-agency delegation meeting with Somaliland’s Minister of Interior, Mohamed Kahin Ahmed
28. Wide shot, the delegation in a meeting with the minister
29. Wide shot, driving through Hargeisa town
30. Med shot, the delegation visits the Waheen market
31. Close up, Jacqueline Saline Olweya, the UNDP Deputy Resident Representative for Somalia.
32. Close up, the Mayor of Hargeisa addressing the delegation at Waheen market
33. Close up, some members of the UN inter-agency delegation
34. Wide shot, Waheen market
35. Med shot, the delegation touring the site of the fire
36. Wide shot, the delegation touring Waheen market
37. Wide shot, another section of Waheen market
38. Pan shot, burnt down shops
39. Med shot, Jacqueline Saline Olweya, the UNDP Deputy Resident Representative for Somalia speaking to one of the fire victims
40. Close up, a victim of the market fire
41. Med shot, a victim of the fire talking to Jacqueline Saline Olweya, the UNDP Deputy Resident Representative for Somalia
42. Close up, a victim of the fire
43. Wide shot, Jacqueline Saline Olweya, the UNDP Deputy Resident Representative for Somalia.
44. SOUNDBITE (English) Jacqueline Saline Olweya, the UNDP Deputy Resident Representative for Somalia:
“I do recall speaking to one of the women and just asking her about the impact that this had had on her and she mentioned two critical things. One is the heat that she has to bear is great because of the destruction of where she was selling her wares, and she related this and the effect it can have on their health as they work. The second thing she spoke about was the requirement of stock, to re-stock the losses that they have incurred. And she was talking about the very limited resources she turned out every year but that is now destroyed, she does not have it anymore, so the site visit also helped us put a human face to the tragedy.”
45. Wide shot, Ministry of Interior building
46. Close up, Ministry of Interior sign
47. Wide shot, the delegation in a meeting with Somaliland’s Minister of Interior, Mohamed Kahin Ahmed, the Minister of Planning and National Development, Omar Ali Abdilahi, and Somaliland’s response committee
47. Close up, Dr. Jama Musse Jama, a senior government advisor serving as the lead on the technical assessment side from the Somaliland authorities speaking at the meeting
48. Med shot, members of the delegation taking notes at the meeting
49. Wide shot, a team from Somaliland’s Minister of Interior attending the meeting
50. Wide shot, members of the delegation at the meeting
51. SOUNDBITE (English) Jacqueline Saline Olweya, the UNDP Deputy Resident Representative for Somalia:
“It is only after we undertake the assessment that we will be able to determine how much resources need to go to the immediate needs, and how much resources can go towards medium- and long-term needs.”
52. Med shot, Ministry of Planning sign
53. Wide shot, Senior Advisor to the President of Somaliland, Dr. Jama Musse Jama, who is also the Chairperson of Somaliland’s Technical Team for Disaster Management and Support for the Waheen Fire Victims, chairing a meeting
54. Close up, Dr. Jama Musse Jama speaking
55. Med shot, response committee in a discussion
56. Close up, Jacqueline Saline Olweya, the UNDP Deputy Resident Representative for Somalia
57. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr. Jama Musse Jama, Senior Advisor to the President of Somaliland and Chairperson of Somaliland Technical Team for Disaster Management and Support for Waheen Fire Victims:
“We are grateful for the work that is taking place and we accept the support brought in terms of expertise, but also the willingness of the UN agencies who will be part of the immediate needs assessment. We have spoken quite a lot and now we need actions – people are waiting for these actions and I am sure that the UN agencies will be part of that.”
58. Tilt up shot, women preparing meals for the security forces and volunteers working at the fire site
59. Close up, women serving food
60. Med shot, a team of volunteers prepare to serve
61. Close up, glasses of juice
62. Med shot, security forces and other residents prepare to break their fast
63. Close up, a volunteer from a local university serving meals
64. SOUNDBITE (Somali) Safiya Aw-Muhumed Hassan, a food vendor:
“I had to volunteer in order to help our forces, the police, the military and our government to show that we care and that we can help ourselves.”
65. SOUNDBITE (English) Hafsa Omer, a social worker and university student:
“I have seen my people go through a lot. I have seen a lot of mothers, a lot of fathers, crying – they have lost their wealth and whatever they had. As a social worker the only thing I can do to help is with food and drink, or whatever they want.”
66. Med shot, volunteers serving meals
67. Wide shot, volunteers packing meals in disposable packs
68. Close up, rice
69. Tracking shot, a volunteer carrying packs of meals
70. Wide shot, a volunteer walking through burnt down shops.
71. Wide shot, sunset

STORYLINE:

More than a week has passed since a blaze destroyed the Waheen market in Hargeisa. The impact of the devastating fire is still being felt, with many local business people reeling from its impact.

“My boutique used to stock clothes. I used to sell all types of clothes. It was a big boutique. I used to feed my elderly parents, my children, as well as my daughters’ children – in total, ten people’s livelihoods depended on my business. I was the only breadwinner for my family and they depended on this boutique, but it is no more,” said Zainab Hassan Warsame, as she stepped through the ashes of where her boutique once stood.

With an estimated 5,000 businesses – ranging from large stores to small stalls – once located in the marketplace, Ms. Warsame is far from alone.

“My business used to feed my entire family… this business sustained many members of my family whose livelihoods directly depended on it. Today, as you can see, it’s completely destroyed,” said Mohamed Abdullahi Muhamoud as he looked around the smouldering ruins.

Located in central Hargeisa and spread out over five square kilometres, the Waheen market was the largest market in Somaliland, and the fourth largest in the Horn of Africa. It drew sellers and shoppers from the city and surrounding communities.

According to Somaliland’s response committee established to lead the immediate relief efforts and planning for the market’s reconstruction, preliminary estimates of the total cost of losses incurred from the fire range between $1.5 billion to $2 billion. In addition, the destruction of so many goods has led to scarcity and inflation in Hargeisa.

In response to the destruction, the United Nations deployed an inter-agency team of technical experts earlier this week to work with the government and the response committee to assess the damage and support the rebuilding of the marketplace.

The team included staff from nine UN agencies, funds and programmes – the UN Development Programme (UNDP), UN-Habitat, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO), the International Labour Organization (ILO), UN Women, the World Health Organization (WHO), the UN Capital Development Fund (UNCDF), the International Organization for Migration (IOM), the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) and the UN Assistance Mission in Somalia (UNSOM).

“The team has experts in environmental issues, legal issues, communication issues and, more importantly, socio-economic as well as health issues, that will be working with the response committee to try to establish what areas need to be responded to,” said one of the inter-agency team’s leaders, Jacqueline Saline Olweya, the UNDP Deputy Resident Representative for Somalia.

Soon after arriving in Hargeisa, members of the team – along with representatives of other international partners, such as the European Union – visited the location, where they saw first-hand the extent of the damage and met business-owners, many of whom, despite the shock, were trying to get back to business with makeshift stalls and limited goods to sell.

“I do recall speaking to one of the women and just asking her about the impact that this had had on her and she mentioned two critical things. One is the heat that she has to bear is great because of the destruction of where she was selling her wares, and she related this and the effect it can have on their health as they work. The second thing she spoke about was the requirement of stock, to re-stock the losses that they have incurred. And she was talking about the very limited resources she turned out every year but that is now destroyed, she does not have it anymore, so the site visit also made us put a human face to the tragedy,” Olweya said.

In the following days, the inter-agency team met with Somaliland’s Minister of Interior, Mohamed Kahin Ahmed, the Minister of Planning and National Development, Omar Ali Abdilahi, and the response committee. In their discussions, the team emphasized the key role that an in-depth assessment will play in helping identify resources needed to rebuild immediately as well as into the future.

“It is only after we undertake the assessment that we will be able to determine how much resources need to go to the immediate needs, and how much resources can go towards medium- and long-term needs,” Olweya said.

The joint assessment report will be finalized in the coming days and will be used at a meeting of international donors scheduled to take place in Nairobi, Kenya, next week.

“We are grateful for the work that is taking place and we accept the support brought in terms of expertise, but also the willingness of the UN agencies who will be part of the immediate needs assessment. We have spoken quite a lot and now we need actions – people are waiting for these actions and I am sure that the UN agencies will be part of that,” said Dr. Jama Musse Jama, a senior government advisor serving as the lead on the technical assessment side from the Somaliland authorities.

In addition to providing for the livelihoods of thousands of local residents, the Waheen marketplace was a significant source of revenue for the Hargeisa municipality, as well as for overall government revenue. Somaliland’s Chamber of Commerce, Industry and Agriculture estimates that the fire accounted for 40 to 50 per cent of the city’s economy.

While the UN inter-agency team worked this week with the authorities on assessing what is needed to rebuild better, local residents provided a ray of hope that, along with international support, solidarity and unity will help the marketplace return to its central role in the city.

"I had to volunteer in order to help our forces, the police, the military and our government to show that we care and that we can help ourselves,” said Safiya Aw-Muhumed Hassan, a food vendor, as she put food for the fire’s victims into containers amidst a group of volunteer helpers.

“I have seen my people go through a lot. I have seen a lot of mothers, a lot of fathers, crying – they have lost their wealth and whatever they had,” added Hafsa Omer, a social worker and university student. “As a social worker the only thing I can do to help is with food and drink.”
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Alternate Title
unifeed220411a
Asset ID
2727668