UN / GENOCIDE AGAINST TUTSI RWANDA

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06-Apr-2022 00:02:28
At a pre-recorded event remembering the victims of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, Secretary-General António Guterres said the genocide against the Tutsi “was neither an accident nor unavoidable,” and a generation after the events, “the state of shame endures as we remember the bloodshed 28 years ago.” UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / GENOCIDE AGAINST TUTSI RWANDA
TRT: 02:28
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 07 APRIL 2022, NEW YORK CITY

SHOTLIST:

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, United Nations headquarters

07 APRIL 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Secretary-General António Guterres walking to candles
3. Close up, Guterres lighting candle
4. Wide shot, Guterres standing for moment of silence, walks away
5. Close up, lit candle
6. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The genocide was neither an accident nor unavoidable. It was deliberate, systematic, and carried out in broad daylight. No one who followed world affairs or watched the news could deny the sickening violence taking place. Yet too few spoke out and fewer still tried to intervene. Much more could have and should have been done. A generation after the events, the state of shame endures as we remember the bloodshed 28 years ago. We recognize that we always have a choice to choose humanity over hatred, compassion over cruelty, courage over complacency, and reconciliation over rage.”
7. Tilt down, lit candles
8. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The remarkable work of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, the first court in history to convict an individual of genocide, was instrumental in his efforts, and it has demonstrated that justice is indispensable for sustainable peace. Rwanda today stands as a powerful testament of the human spirit's ability to heal even the deepest wounds and to emerge from the darkest depths to rebuild a stronger society.”
9. Close up, lit candles
10. SOUNDBITE (English) António Guterres, Secretary-General, United Nations:
“The genocide against the Tutsi raised questions that affect all humankind. Fundamental questions about the role of the Security Council, the effectiveness of peacekeeping, the need to end the impunity for international crimes, the need to address the roots of violence, and the fragility of civility. We have great tests before us. Today, Ukraine is in flames and all the new conflicts fester in the Middle East, Africa and beyond. The Security Council agrees mostly to disagree, contributing to an environment of perceived impunity for state and non-state-actors.”

STORYLINE:

At a pre-recorded event remembering the victims of the 1994 genocide in Rwanda, Secretary-General António Guterres said the genocide against the Tutsi “was neither an accident nor unavoidable,” and a generation after the events, “the state of shame endures as we remember the bloodshed 28 years ago.”

Guterres said at the time “too few spoke out and fewer still tried to intervene,” and added that “much more could have and should have been done.”

He said, “we always have a choice to choose humanity over hatred, compassion over cruelty, courage over complacency, and reconciliation over rage.”

The “remarkable” work of the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda, the Secretary-General said, “has demonstrated that justice is indispensable for sustainable peace.”

He said Rwanda “today stands as a powerful testament of the human spirit's ability to heal even the deepest wounds and to emerge from the darkest depths to rebuild a stronger society.”

Guterres said the genocide against the Tutsi in Rwanda raised “fundamental questions about the role of the Security Council, the effectiveness of peacekeeping, the need to end the impunity for international crimes, the need to address the roots of violence, and the fragility of civility.”

He said, “today, Ukraine is in flames and all the new conflicts fester in the Middle East, Africa and beyond” while the Security Council “agrees mostly to disagree, contributing to an environment of perceived impunity for state and non-state-actors.”

On April 6,1994, an aircraft carrying President Habyarimana of Rwanda and President Ntaryamira of Burundi crashed at Kigali airport, killing all those on board.

The night of April 6, the Rwandan Armed Forces and the “Interahamwe” militia set up roadblocks and started going from house to house killing Tutsis and moderate Hutu politicians. Over the course of the following 100 days an estimated 800,000 to 1,000,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus were killed by extremist Hutus. An estimated 100,000 to 250,000 women were raped during the three months of genocide.

The Security Council on 8 November 1994 set up the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (ICTR) to "prosecute persons responsible for genocide and other serious violations of international humanitarian law committed in the territory of Rwanda and neighbouring States, between 1 January 1994 and 31 December 1994." The Tribunal was located in Arusha, Tanzania, and had offices in Kigali, Rwanda. Its Appeals Chamber was located in The Hague, Netherlands. The Tribunal indicted 93 individuals whom it considered responsible for serious violations of international humanitarian law committed in Rwanda in 1994. Those indicted included high-ranking military and government officials, politicians, businessmen, as well as religious, militia, and media leaders. The court convicted the Prime Minister during the genocide Jean Kambanda, to life in prison. The ICTR ended its term on 31 December 2015.

More than one million people were systematically murdered in less than three months in Rwanda.
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