WORLD BANK / FOOD SECURITY

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05-Apr-2022 00:03:40
The World Bank Group said on Tuesday that governments should avoid restricting food exports which could exacerbate food price increases. Instead, governments should support the most vulnerable consumers facing high food costs and help food producers cope with high input costs. WORLD BANK

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STORY: WORLD BANK / FOOD SECURITY
TRT: 3:40
SOURCE: WORLD BANK GROUP
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE : 5 APRIL 2022, WASHINGTON, DC, USA

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, World Bank Group Headquarters in Washington, DC in April 2022
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Juergen Voegele, Vice President for Sustainable Development, World Bank:
“Hunger has been rising for a number of years. Well before the Ukraine crisis and even well before COVID. The number of hungry people in 2020 was already about 800 million and rising, unfortunately, a hundred million more than we had the year before. And this is probably because of the impacts of the COVID pandemic but it's also because of the long-standing drivers of food insecurities such as conflicts, extreme weather events and pests and diseases.”
3. Wide shot, World Bank Group Headquarters in Washington, DC in April 2022
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Juergen Voegele, Vice President for Sustainable Development, World Bank:
“The compounding shock, if you want of the war in Ukraine may cause severe outcomes for vulnerable people in several Middle East, North African countries if the humanitarian and development assistance are not scaled up.”
5. Wide shot, World Bank Group Headquarters in Washington, DC in April 2022
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Juergen Voegele, Vice President for Sustainable Development, World Bank:
“Now, last year, the MENA region accounted for only 6 per cent of the world's total population, but actually over 20 per cent of the world's acutely food insecure people. Think of Yemen and a number of other areas. More generally, the poorest and most import-dependent countries are at risk through trade disruptions and import costs.”
5. Wide shot, World Bank Group Headquarters in Washington, DC in April 2022
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Juergen Voegele, Vice President for Sustainable Development, World Bank:
“It's tempting to restrict exports, to avoid local shortages, but it has very, very detrimental implications as we saw when we went through the 2007-2008 food price crisis. The trick is really to move food from places of surplus to places of need and that's what needs to happen in this round as well.”
7. Wide shot, World Bank Group Headquarters in Washington, DC in April 2022
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Juergen Voegele, Vice President for Sustainable Development, World Bank:
“Besides keeping the flow going, the food trade flow, governments really should support the most vulnerable consumers facing high food costs and help those producers cope with high input costs. How that's done is also important to really avoid entrenching mechanisms with unintended consequences. In general, it's much better to protect the purchasing power of the poorest households through well targeted nutrition sensitive social protection programs, rather than maintaining prices artificially low for everyone.”
9. Wide shot, World Bank Group Headquarters in Washington, DC in April 2022
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Juergen Voegele, Vice President for Sustainable Development, World Bank:
“We have been in touch with a number of countries in East Africa, West Africa, North Africa, Middle East, several other parts of the world, even before the pandemic, but now it's really been ramping up. A lot of countries are asking for support and we've responded with a whole set of emergency financing and new projects. And we actually expect to do more with this additional shock. The World Bank has provided significant support—just in the last two years, about 17 billion annually in combined IDA and IBRD lending. This is up from about 12 billion on average in the previous three years, primarily for agriculture and the social protection measures.”
11. Wide shot, World Bank Group Headquarters in Washington, DC in April 2022

STORYLINE:

The World Bank Group said on Tuesday (05 Apr) that governments should avoid restricting food exports which could exacerbate food price increases. Instead, governments should support the most vulnerable consumers facing high food costs and help food producers cope with high input costs.

The war in Ukraine is impacting fertilizer and food prices through short term impacts on wheat supplies and by pushing up food prices that were already near record highs because of the COVID-19 pandemic, extreme weather events and pests and disease.

The World Bank has provided significant support for food security measures in the last two years – about $17 billion annually, up from $12 billion on average in the previous three years, primarily for agriculture and social protection measures.
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