WHO / POLAND UKRAINIAN REFUGEES

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28-Mar-2022 00:05:13
The World Health Oganization (WHO) said the majority of refugees coming to Poland from Ukraine are women, children, and the elderly. WHO

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STORY: WHO / POLAND UKRAINIAN REFUGEES
TRT: 5:13
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: PLEASE CREDIT WHO ON SCREEN
LANGUAGE: UKRAINIAN / POLISH / ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 7-8 MARCH 2022, DOROHUSK / HORODLO, POLAND

SHOTLIST:

7 MARCH 2022, DOROHUSK, POLAND

1. Wide shot, mothers and children resting at the refugee reception centre in Dorohusk
2. Various shots, Ukrainian refugees taking a bus to Warsaw
3. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Yana, Ukrainian refugee from Kyiv and her 3-month-old daughter Olha:
“They gave us food and warmed us up. An interpreter told us where to go.”
4. SOUNDBITE (Polish) Beate Sawicka, Polish nurse working at the reception centre of Dorohusk:
“Now there are more elderly people, who have chronic conditions. There are people with disabilities. Before that there were mostly mothers and children.”
5. Med shot, Beate Sawicka comforting an elderly Ukrainian woman who found shelter at the reception centre in Dorohusk
6. SOUNDBITE (Polish) Beate Sawicka, Polish nurse working at the reception centre of Dorohusk:
“My heart breaks to see them like this. They are not only sick, they are also exhausted, very tired, tearful. We are trying to help as much as possible. For some of them we have to change their diapers while they are sitting on their wheelchair in order not to move them around too much. I've been working as a nurse for 34 years. I've been dealing with patients like that all this time, but in proper conditions at a proper hospital. Here they are coming cold, dirty, because they are traveling for 48 hours. My heart is breaking apart. It's frightening, what we see here.”

8 MARCH 2022, HORODLO, POLAND

7. Wide shot, exterior, people arriving at the Horodlo transit centre
8. Various shots, pets in cars belonging to Ukrainian refugees
9. UPSOUND (Ukrainian) Valentina, Ukrainian refugee waiting for her daughter at the transit centre of Horodlo. Valentina had polio which left her partially paralyzed:
“I am alone, I am alone.”
10. Wide shot, interior of the Horodlo reception centre, a school gymnasium
11. UPSOUND (Ukrainian) Valentina, Ukrainian refugee waiting for her daughter at the transit centre of Horodlo. Valentina had polio which left her partially paralyzed:
“I walk only to some degree. I practically don't walk, I walk only a little.”
12. Various shots, interior of the Horodlo reception centre, a school gymnasium, adults resting and kids playing in the middle of cuddly toys
13. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Valentina, Ukrainian refugee waiting for her daughter at the transit centre of Horodlo:
“People would carry me around in their arms everywhere. From the bus, to the bus, everywhere people helped.”

9 MARCH 2022, BUDOMIERZ, POLAND

14. Various shots, Selma Sevkli walking near tents set up to provide services for refugees including providing hot meals, hygiene supplies, specific items for babies and mothers that have been donated by the Polish public

9 MARCH 2022, KROWICA SAMA, POLAND

15. SOUNDBITE (English) Selma Sevkli, WHO mental health and psychosocial support expert:
“What you are feeling, what you are going through is very normal. You might sometimes feel: ‘Why am I not strong?’, ‘What’s going to happen?’, fear; all of that is very normal. Everybody is going through the same thing. Right now, it’s important to take it day by day and try to keep yourself calm. You are surrounded with a lot of people with good hearts who are trying to help from all over the world right now. It’s just a bit complicated and hectic right now. Everybody is trying to help, and we are trying to organize this help so that not only here, but after where you go, you get the support you need. Health, mental health and other needs. This is our goal.”
16. Wide shot, interior of the reception centre of Krowica Sama with camp beds set up for refugees
17. Various shots, elderly people in wheelchairs
18. Med shot, Selma talking to Olga, a 20-year-old medical student from Ukraine
19. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Olga, refugee and medical student from Kyiv:
“Psychological aid is needed, I think. People are disoriented and lost. My mother, for example, is lost. She cries, checks news on her phone and has no idea what is next. My little sister is the same. She doesn't want to play or engage with anyone. She wants to go home.”
20. Wide shot, little girls playing next to each other in the reception centre at Krowica Sama
21. SOUNDBITE (Ukrainian) Olga, a refugee and medical student from Kyiv:
“We have only one dream: we want to live in peace in Ukraine. A lot of people want to go back. A lot of people feel uncomfortable, because they don't want to be a burden for those, who host us. Everyone just wants to go home, that's all.”
22. Med shots, pets carried by Ukrainian refugees in the reception centre

STORYLINE:

The World Health Oganization (WHO) said the majority of refugees coming to Poland from Ukraine are women, children, and the elderly.

Yana and her 3-month-old daughter Olha, from Korosten, arrived at the reception centre of Dorohusk, on 7 March. She fled Ukraine with her daughter, two sisters, one younger brother and her mother. Her husband stayed in Ukraine to fight. As the journey to Poland was bitterly cold, they were grateful for the shelter, the warm food and the medical attention that has been provided to them. Her daughter is due her second dose of diphtheria vaccine and she hopes she can get it in Poland.

Beate has been working as a nurse for 34 years at a local hospital in Poland. Since the beginning of the war, she’s been working 12 hours a day at the reception point of Dorohusk, a few kilometres from the border crossing. When she is not providing medical support, Beate extends her shift and works in the kitchen in the reception to provide hot food for the refugees. Women, children and elderly make up the refugees here.

Valentina, 67, is from Bila Tserkva. She is waiting at the refugee transit centre of Horodlo, eastern Poland. She had polio as a young child, which left her partially disabled. She fled her home because she was terrified. She was forced to travel alone as her nephew wasn't strong enough for the journey. People helped carry her to Poland, a trip which took 3 days. In Poland she now feels safe. She has seen a doctor and she has been given medicine for her pain. She is waiting for her daughter to pick her up and take her to Israel with her.

Selma is a mental health and psychosocial support expert for the World Health Organization. By talking to refugees and health workers, she assesses their needs in order to provide support, especially in the critical fields of mental health and psychosocial support.

Olga is a refugee and medical student. She came to Poland where she will be staying with a friend. She is from Kyiv and came with her mother and her sister to Poland. Their journey took 20 hours to arrive to the reception centre of Krowica Sama. She is worried about what the future will bring.
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