WHO / UKRAINE ETHIOPIA

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16-Mar-2022 00:05:33
WHO’s chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said, WHO’s priority in Ukraine remains to “support health workers and the health system to continue to provide care to meet immediate health needs.” WHO

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STORY: WHO / UKRAINE ETHIOPIA
TRT: 5:33
SOURCE: WHO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 16 MARCH 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

1.Wide shot, press briefing room
2. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“WHO’s priority remains to support health workers and the health system to continue to provide care to meet immediate health needs. We have now established supply lines to many cities of Ukraine, but challenges with access remain. So far, we have sent about 100 metric tonnes of supplies, including oxygen, insulin, surgical supplies, anesthetics, and blood transfusion kits. Other equipment, including oxygen generators, electrical generators, defibrillators and more have also been delivered, and we are preparing to send a further 108 metric tonnes. We are coordinating the deployment of 20 Emergency Medical Teams of experts from many countries, pending a formal request for assistance from Ukraine’s Ministry of Health."
3.Wide shot, press briefing room
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“More than 300 health facilities are along conflict lines or in areas that Russia now controls, and a further 600 facilities are within 10 kilometres of the conflict line. Since the beginning of the war in Ukraine, WHO has verified 43 attacks on health care. WHO condemns all attacks on health care, wherever they occur."
5. Wide shot, press briefing room
6. SOUNDBITE (English)Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“2022 is only 75 days old, but already WHO has verified 89 attacks on health care around the world, in Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Libya, Nigeria, the occupied Palestinian territory, Sudan, the Syrian Arab Republic, and of course, Ukraine. Altogether, these attacks have injured 53 people and killed 35, including health workers. That includes 8 polio health workers who were killed in Afghanistan last month."
7. Wide shot, press briefing room
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“In Ethiopia, 6 million people in Tigray have been under blockade by Ethiopian and Eritrean forces for almost 500 days, sealed off from the outside world. There is almost no fuel, no cash, and no communications. No food aid has been delivered since the middle of December. 83 percent of the population is food insecure. Our partners are running out of what little food they have, and the fuel to transport it. About three-quarters of health facilities assessed by WHO have been damaged or destroyed."
9. Wide shot, press briefing room
10.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus, WHO Director-General:
“People are dying. There is no treatment for forty-six thousand people who need treatment for HIV, and the programme has been abandoned. People with tuberculosis, hypertension, diabetes and cancer are also not being treated, and may have died. As a result of the lack of fuel, some of our partners are having to scale back their operations. The situation in Tigray is catastrophic. The blockade on communications, including on journalists being able to report from Tigray, means it remains a forgotten crisis – out of sight, and out of mind."
11. Wide shot, press briefing room
12. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Mike Ryan EXD, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“We're only a very short part into this year and we have never seen globally, never seen this rate of attacks on health care. Health is becoming a target in these situations, is becoming part of the strategy and tactics of war. It is entirely, entirely unacceptable. It is against international humanitarian law. And in fact, under international humanitarian law, conflicting parties are actually instructed to specifically take measures to avoid attacking or inadvertently destroying or hurting health workers or health facilities. They don't bear responsibility not just to not attack. They actually bear responsibility to ensure that they don't attack, to identify those facilities, to deconflict those facilities, and to ensure that they do not, as part of their prosecution of war, attack those facilities.”
13. Wide shot, press briefing room
14.SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Mike Ryan EXD, WHO Health Emergencies Programme:
“How can we put emergency medical teams on the ground if the very facilities that they may want to go and support are going to be attacked and going to be bombed and going to going to suffer catastrophic damage. This crisis is reaching a point where the health system in Ukraine is teetering on the brink and is doing exceptionally well. It needs to be supported. It needs to be shored up. It needs to be given the basic tools to save lives. Part of that is deploying teams in to support that. But how can you do that in all conscience if the very infrastructure that those people will go into support is being under direct attack? "
15. Wide shot, press briefing room

STORYLINE:

WHO’s chief Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus said, WHO’s priority in Ukraine remains to “support health workers and the health system to continue to provide care to meet immediate health needs.”

Speaking to reporters today (16 Mar) in Geneva, Tedros said, “we have now established supply lines to many cities of Ukraine, but challenges with access remain. So far, we have sent about 100 metric tonnes of supplies, including oxygen, insulin, surgical supplies, anesthetics, and blood transfusion kits.”

The WHO’s chief added, “other equipment, including oxygen generators, electrical generators, defibrillators and more have also been delivered, and we are preparing to send a further 108 metric tonnes. We are coordinating the deployment of 20 Emergency Medical Teams of experts from many countries, pending a formal request for assistance from Ukraine’s Ministry of Health."

Tedros also said, “more than 300 health facilities are along conflict lines or in areas that Russia now controls, and a further 600 facilities are within 10 kilometres of the conflict line. Since the beginning of the war in Ukraine, WHO has verified 43 attacks on health care. WHO condemns all attacks on health care, wherever they occur."

He added, “2022 is only 75 days old, but already WHO has verified 89 attacks on health care around the world, in Afghanistan, Burkina Faso, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Libya, Nigeria, the occupied Palestinian territory, Sudan, the Syrian Arab Republic, and of course, Ukraine. Altogether, these attacks have injured 53 people and killed 35, including health workers. That includes 8 polio health workers who were killed in Afghanistan last month."

On Ethiopia, Tedros said, “six million people in Tigray have been under blockade by Ethiopian and Eritrean forces for almost 500 days, sealed off from the outside world. There is almost no fuel, no cash, and no communications. No food aid has been delivered since the middle of December. 83 percent of the population is food insecure. Our partners are running out of what little food they have, and the fuel to transport it. About three-quarters of health facilities assessed by WHO have been damaged or destroyed."

He continued, “people are dying. There is no treatment for forty-six thousand people who need treatment for HIV, and the programme has been abandoned. People with tuberculosis, hypertension, diabetes and cancer are also not being treated, and may have died.”

The WHO’s chief added, “as a result of the lack of fuel, some of our partners are having to scale back their operations. The situation in Tigray is catastrophic. The blockade on communications, including on journalists being able to report from Tigray, means it remains a forgotten crisis – out of sight, and out of mind."

WHO’s Mike Ryan said, “we're only a very short part into this year and we have never seen globally, never seen this rate of attacks on health care. Health is becoming a target in these situations, is becoming part of the strategy and tactics of war. It is entirely, entirely unacceptable.”

He reiterated, “it is against international humanitarian law. And in fact, under international humanitarian law, conflicting parties are actually instructed to specifically take measures to avoid attacking or inadvertently destroying or hurting health workers or health facilities.”

Ryan continued, “they don't bear responsibility not just to not attack. They actually bear responsibility to ensure that they don't attack, to identify those facilities, to deconflict those facilities, and to ensure that they do not, as part of their prosecution of war, attack those facilities.”

He also said, “how can we put emergency medical teams on the ground if the very facilities that they may want to go and support are going to be attacked and going to be bombed and going to going to suffer catastrophic damage.”

Ryan added, “this crisis is reaching a point where the health system in Ukraine is teetering on the brink and is doing exceptionally well. It needs to be supported. It needs to be shored up. It needs to be given the basic tools to save lives. Part of that is deploying teams in to support that. But how can you do that in all conscience if the very infrastructure that those people will go into support is being under direct attack? "
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