UNSCEAR / FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR PLANT

Preview Language:   Original
11-Mar-2022 00:03:41
On the 11th anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident in Japan, a newly translated report by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) in Japanese is being released which details the levels and effects of radiation exposure ten years after in the aftermath of the disaster. UNSCEAR

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STORY: UNSCEAR / FUKUSHIMA NUCLEAR PLANT
TRT: 3:41
SOURCE: UNSCEAR / FILE
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 07 MARCH 2022, VIENNA, AUSTRIA / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE - FILM MAKER GEORG STEINBOECK

1. Aerial shots, headquarters of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) at the Vienna International Centre

07 MARCH 2022, VIENNA, AUSTRIA

2. SOUNDBITE (English) Borislava Batandjieva-Metcalf, Secretary, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR):
“UNSCEAR is a very unique scientific body established by the United Nations General Assembly 65 years ago with a very specific mandate to provide an independent, authoritative and high-quality evaluation of the levels, sources, effects, mechanisms and the risks from ionising radiation.”

FILE – CTBTO - FUKUSHIMA, JAPAN, SEPTEMBER 2011

3. Various shots, destruction caused by the March 11, 2011 tsunami in Japan

FILE – IAEA - FUKUSHIMA, JAPAN, 25 JULY 2011

4. Various shots, destruction of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station

07 MARCH 2022, VIENNA, AUSTRIA

5. SOUNDBITE (English) Borislava Batandjieva-Metcalf, Secretary, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR):
“Now, having ten years after the accident, there is much more available monitoring data and published peer-reviewed literature which was taken into consideration by the Committee.”
6. Various shots, Secretary Batandjieva-Metcalf at the computer
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Borislava Batandjieva-Metcalf, Secretary, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR):
“Of course, it provided more realistic estimates of the exposure to the workers, to the public and also to the potential health implications from this accident ten years after.”
8. Various shots, Secretary Batandjieva-Metcalf scanning the UNSCEAR report
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Borislava Batandjieva-Metcalf, Secretary, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR):
“The radioactivity that was released from the Fukushima Daiichi power station was about 10 percent of the radioactivity that was released from the Chernobyl accident. Also from that radioactivity released in the atmosphere, about only 20 percent was deposited on land as 80 percent of the radioactivity was removed to the Pacific Ocean.”
10. Wide shot, UNSCEAR team on a teleconference in the UNSCEAR headquarters in Vienna, Austria
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Borislava Batandjieva-Metcalf, Secretary, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR):
“Because the estimated exposures are very low, which means that this implies that the risk for any health effects is very low.”
12. Wide shot, UNSCEAR team on a teleconference
13. Close up, monitor with participants in teleconference
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Borislava Batandjieva-Metcalf, Secretary, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR):
“Looking at the new data that is available up to date, the Committee concluded that it is very unlikely and there's no direct correlation between the increase and reported thyroid cancer risks in children.”
15. Wide shot, Batandjieva-Metcalf during interview
16. SOUNDBITE (English) Borislava Batandjieva-Metcalf, Secretary, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR):
“The Committee has concluded that there's no evidence to show that there's going to be a direct impact or effect from the radiation, from the accident to the hereditary functions or any hereditary effect on pregnant women.”
17. Wide shot, Batandjieva-Metcalf during interview
18. SOUNDBITE (English) Borislava Batandjieva-Metcalf, Secretary, United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR):
“Ten years after there has been evaluation of all relevant scientific, independent data that is existing to date, and concluded that it is unlikely that those conclusions could change with time.”
19. Various shots, headquarters of the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) at the Vienna International Centre

STORYLINE:

On the 11th anniversary of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident in Japan, a newly translated report by the United Nations Scientific Committee on the Effects of Atomic Radiation (UNSCEAR) in Japanese is being released which details the levels and effects of radiation exposure ten years after in the aftermath of the disaster.

The translated UNSCEAR report is also being released ahead of a mission to Japan in the coming months, aimed at presenting the Committee’s findings to the Japanese people and scientific community.

On 11 March 2011 a 9.0-magnitude earthquake near Honshu, Japan, created a devastating tsunami that flooded over 500 square kilometres of land and resulted in the loss of more than 20,000 lives. It also led to the worst civil nuclear accident since the one in Chernobyl in 1986: radioactive material was released into the environment from the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station located about 160 kilometres north of Tokyo.

A recently updated UNSCEAR report concluded that no documented adverse health effects among Fukushima residents could be directly attributed to radiation exposure from the accident, nor are expected in the future.

”The radioactivity that was released from the Fukushima Daiichi power station was about 10 percent of the radioactivity that was released from the Chernobyl accident,” said Borislava Batandjieva-Metcalf, Secretary of UNSCEAR. “Also, from that radioactivity released in the atmosphere, about only 20 percent was deposited on land as 80 percent of the radioactivity was removed to the Pacific Ocean.”

“Because the estimated exposures are very low, which means that this implies that the risk for any health effects is very low,” Secretary Batandjieva-Metcalf added.

Compiled by over 30 experts, the report summarizes all relevant scientific information available relating to the levels and effects of radiation available through 2019. This included more than 1600 peer-reviewed publications. The report was also independently reviewed by 13 critical reviewers with input from more than 200 of the Committee’s experts, including 12 international organizations.

In its report, the Committee concluded that an extensive 5-year decontamination programme in Japan overall reduced annual public doses to less than 1 mSv (above background) in most inhabited areas, and enabled return to many evacuated municipalities. It also said that no adverse health effects among Fukushima residents have been documented that could be directly attributed to radiation exposure from the accident.

The report added that, on the balance of available evidence, the large increase, relative to that expected, in the number of thyroid cancers detected among exposed children is the result of intensive thyroid screening, and not of is not the result of radiation exposure.

“Ten years after there has been evaluation of all relevant scientific, independent data that is existing to date, and concluded that it is unlikely that those conclusions could change with time,” said Secretary Batandjieva-Metcalf.

The updated UNSCEAR 2020/2021 report, Annex B was endorsed by the UN General Assembly at the end of 2021. UNSCEAR outreach activities in Japan are planned in the coming months, to present the report to the Japanese public and scientific communities.

UNSCEAR reports to the UN General Assembly. It is tasked to review and evaluate levels of ionizing radiation and radioactivity in the environment, as well as the effects of ionizing radiation upon people and their environment.
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unifeed220311b
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2718340