UN / SANCTIONS HUMANITARIAN CONSEQUENCES

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07-Feb-2022 00:02:56
Under Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, Rosemary Dicarlo told the Security Council that “sanctions remain a vital Charter-based tool available to the Council to ensure the maintenance of international peace and security,” but stressed that “more can be done to reduce the possible adverse consequences” of these sanctions. UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / SANCTIONS HUMANITARIAN CONSEQUENCES
TRT: 02:56
SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / RUSSIAN / NATS

DATELINE: 07 FEBRUARY 2022, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

FILE - NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior UN Headquarters

07 FEBRUARY 2022, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, Security Council
3. Med shot, delegates
4. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary Dicarlo, Under Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations:
“Sanctions remain a vital Charter-based tool available to the Council to ensure the maintenance of international peace and security. As stressed when the Council last met to discuss this topic, they are not an end in themselves. To be effective, sanctions should be part of a comprehensive political strategy, working in tandem with direct political dialogue, mediation, peacekeeping and special political missions.”
5. Med shot, delegates
6. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary Dicarlo, Under Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations:
“More can be done to reduce the possible adverse consequences of sanctions.”
7. Med shot, delegates
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Rosemary Dicarlo, Under Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, United Nations:
“Various Council resolutions make it clear that sanctions are “not intended to have adverse humanitarian consequences for the civilian populations”. Other resolutions require that Member States ensure that their implementation measures comply with their obligations under international law, including humanitarian and human rights laws, as applicable. It is extremely important to recall these provisions at every opportunity.”
9. Wide shot, Council with Martin Griffiths on screen
10. SOUNDBITE (English) Martin Griffiths, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator:
“Sanctions are a fact of life in many humanitarian relief operations. They affect our operations directly and indirectly, and affect civilians, even when those impacts are unintended. However smart, however targeted they are, compliance with sanctions is a daily element in the work of humanitarian agencies. They can impact our logistics, our finances, our ability to deliver. They can have those impacts. They can lead to humanitarian projects delaying or stalling. And some, some can threaten the well-being of a wider section of the population.”
11. Wide shot, Council, Griffiths seen on monitors
12. SOUNDBITE (Russian) Dmitry Polyanskiy, First Deputy Permanent Representative to the United Nations, Russian Federation:
“International sanctions need to reflect the situation on the ground, and such sanctions should serve to further a political process, and sanctions regimes should be subject to regular review, and they should be modified, and this includes a full lifting of sanctions where applicable. We emphatically call for the targeted and flexible nature of UN Security Council restrictions to become standard practice. There is a need to closely and attentively heed the views of the authorities of the sanctioned states, as well as a need to more realistically formulate so-called benchmarks to prevent them from morphing into deliberately unattainable objectives.”
13. Med shot, delegates
14. Wide shot, Council


STORYLINE:

Under Secretary-General for Political and Peacebuilding Affairs, Rosemary Dicarlo today (7 Feb) told the Security Council that “sanctions remain a vital Charter-based tool available to the Council to ensure the maintenance of international peace and security,” but stressed that “more can be done to reduce the possible adverse consequences” of these sanctions.

Dicarlo said sanctions “are not an end in themselves” and added that to be effective, “sanctions should be part of a comprehensive political strategy, working in tandem with direct political dialogue, mediation, peacekeeping and special political missions.”

The political and peacebuilding affairs official noted that various Council resolutions make it clear that sanctions are “not intended to have adverse humanitarian consequences for the civilian populations,” while other resolutions “require that Member States ensure that their implementation measures comply with their obligations under international law, including humanitarian and human rights laws, as applicable.”

She stressed that it was “extremely important to recall these provisions at every opportunity.”

Briefing the Council remotely, Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator, Martin Griffiths, said, “sanctions are a fact of life in many humanitarian relief operations. They affect our operations directly and indirectly, and affect civilians, even when those impacts are unintended.”

Sanctions, he continued, “can impact our logistics, our finances, our ability to deliver. They can have those impacts. They can lead to humanitarian projects delaying or stalling. And some, some can threaten the well-being of a wider section of the population.”

For his part, Russian Ambassador Dmitry Polyanskiy told the Council that “international sanctions need to reflect the situation on the ground, and such sanctions should serve to further a political process, and sanctions regimes should be subject to regular review, and they should be modified, and this includes a full lifting of sanctions where applicable.”

Polyanskiy called for “the targeted and flexible nature of UN Security Council restrictions to become standard practice” and said, “there is a need to closely and attentively heed the views of the authorities of the sanctioned states, as well as a need to more realistically formulate so-called benchmarks to prevent them from morphing into deliberately unattainable objectives.”

The Russian Federation holds the presidency of the Council for the month of February.
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