ILO / WORLD EMPLOYMENT SOCIAL OUTLOOK 2022

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17-Jan-2022 00:02:52
The ILO’s World Employment and Social Outlook Trends 2022 report warns of a slow and uncertain recovery, as the pandemic continues to have a significant impact on global labour markets. ILO

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STORY: ILO / WORLD EMPLOYMENT SOCIAL OUTLOOK 2022
TRT: 2:52
SOURCE: ILO
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 17 JANUARY 2022, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

1. Wide shot, press briefing room
2. Close up, Guy Ryder ILO Director-General speaking
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General:
“The main finding of our report is that the labour market recovery from the COVID 19 crisis is incomplete, it is fragile and it's uneven. So we expect in 2022, that the number of hours actually worked in the global economy will still be considerably below pre-pandemic levels. And that represents effectively the loss of 52 million full-time job equivalents. So we are not even back to the starting point. So that's the incomplete nature.”
4. Wide shot, press briefing room
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General:
“Uneven as well, largely due to the uneven rollout of vaccines, due to unequal stimulus capacity, because of different financial capacities. Some countries, some regions are doing better than others. So the rich world, Europe and north America, is getting back to prepandemic levels more quickly but some regions are doing less well. And the uncertainty comes from the fact that we are facing inflationary pressures and supply chain blockages, which means things might continue to improve, but they could also go quite badly wrong as well.”
6. Wide shot, press briefing room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General:
“The great divergence means that rich countries are getting back and getting richer more quickly and the opposite happening in the developing and emerging economies. But, you know, we've actually set out as an organization, the sort of agenda for action that we think is necessary. It’s in the Global Call to Action adopted by our conference back in June of last year. And I think that spoken of in a general way, what we need to see is a genuine common international effort to pull the world forward from this pandemic. If each country goes its own way, I fear that the great divergence is only going to get worse rather than better. And that's really important in a world which is already suffering, I think, the stresses and strains of increased inequalities.”
8. Wide shot, press briefing room
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Ryder, ILO Director-General:
“So international cooperation; very careful, I think, and considered responses to issues of financial strain, of some inflation that we are seeing, and certainly not a premature return to restrictive policies. It's a delicate time. There are policy conundrums ahead of us, but I think through dialogue and cooperation, we can, and we must find the right way forward.”
10. Wide shot, press briefing room

STORYLINE:

The ILO’s World Employment and Social Outlook Trends 2022 report warns of a slow and uncertain recovery, as the pandemic continues to have a significant impact on global labour markets.

The International Labour Organization (ILO) has downgraded its forecast for labour market recovery in 2022, projecting a deficit in hours worked globally equivalent to 52 million full-time jobs, relative to the fourth quarter of 2019.

The previous full-year estimate in May 2021 projected a deficit of 26 million full-time equivalent jobs. While this latest projection is an improvement on the situation in 2021, it remains almost two per cent below the number of global hours worked pre-pandemic, according to the ILO World Employment and Social Outlook – Trends 2022 (WESO Trends).

Speaking to reporters in Geneva today (17 Jan), ILO Director-General Guy Ryder said, “the main finding of our report is that the labour market recovery from the COVID 19 crisis is incomplete, it is fragile and it's uneven. So we expect in 2022, that the number of hours actually worked in the global economy will still be considerably below pre-pandemic levels. And that represents effectively the loss of 52 million full-time job equivalents. So we are not even back to the starting point. So that's the incomplete nature.”

He added, “uneven as well, largely due to the uneven rollout of vaccines, due to unequal stimulus capacity, because of different financial capacities. Some countries, some regions are doing better than others. So the rich world, Europe and north America, is getting back to prepandemic levels more quickly but some regions are doing less well.” “And the uncertainty comes from the fact that we are facing inflationary pressures and supply chain blockages, which means things might continue to improve, but they could also go quite badly wrong as well.”

Ryder also said, “the great divergence means that rich countries are getting back and getting richer more quickly and the opposite happening in the developing and emerging economies. But, you know, we've actually set out as an organization, the sort of agenda for action that we think is necessary. It’s in the Global Call to Action adopted by our conference back in June of last year. And I think that spoken of in a general way, what we need to see is a genuine common international effort to pull the world forward from this pandemic. If each country goes its own way, I fear that the great divergence is only going to get worse rather than better. And that's really important in a world which is already suffering, I think, the stresses and strains of increased inequalities.”

The ILO Director-General reiterated, “so international cooperation; very careful, I think, and considered responses to issues of financial strain, of some inflation that we are seeing, and certainly not a premature return to restrictive policies. It's a delicate time. There are policy conundrums ahead of us, but I think through dialogue and cooperation, we can, and we must find the right way forward.”
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