UN / YEMEN HUMANITARIAN PRESSER

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16-Dec-2021 00:03:00
UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Yemen, David Gressly said his primary concern is not just the immediate humanitarian suffering that one sees in Yemen, but the gradual deterioration in the country, “the longer this conflict drags on, the deeper that will go,” he added. UNIFEED

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STORY: UN / YEMEN HUMANITARIAN PRESSER
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SOURCE: UNIFEED
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 16 DECEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY / FILE

SHOTLIST:

RECENT – NEW YORK CITY

1. Wide shot, exterior, United Nations

16 DECEMBER 2021, NEW YORK CITY

2. Wide shot, press briefing room
3. SOUNDBITE (English) David Gressly, UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Yemen:
“And this is my primary concern – it’s not just the immediate humanitarian suffering that one sees, but the gradual deterioration in the country. The longer this conflict drags on, the deeper that will go. At a certain point in time, and I've had my own experience in other countries where these conflicts, this type of conflict has continued for 20 or 25 years. It results in a totally transformed country, one in which you have one or two generations of young people who have not known peace, who have not known access to education, who had to find ways to survive and help their families survive. It's not the life that we want them to live on.”
4. Wide shot, press briefing room
5. SOUNDBITE (English) David Gressly, UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Yemen:
“Infrastructure is easy. Human capital is very difficult to rebuild, but more importantly, just the psychological toll that that takes and that kind of transformation will have stepped in. So it's extremely important that the peace efforts that are underway are sustained going forward.”
6. Wide shot, press briefing room
7. SOUNDBITE (English) David Gressly, UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Yemen:
“So it's the collapse of the economy has led to a significant reduction for the most marginalized and particular income to buy food. And you combine that with the restrictions placed on the economy because of the conflict, the inspections, the port closures, the kinds of checkpoints and multiple taxation that takes place in this kind of environment, also drives up the price of commodities. Most of the food that comes to Yemen, whether it's commercial, or humanitarian, most of its commercial, 90 per cent of the food that comes in country is imported. So if the price is determined by the cost of food coming in and its distribution internally, that is multiplied multiple times that costs.”
8. Wide shot, press briefing room
9. SOUNDBITE (English) David Gressly, UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Yemen:
“We've benefited from about $2.2 billion coming in to support the people of Yemen. But that's only about, it's less than 60 per cent of the requirements. And so we're still short about $1.6 billion at this point in time, having $3.8 that we requested. And we are facing a bit of a crisis as we go into 2022. For example, the World Food Program, its pipeline is so weak going into 2022. They only have 30 per cent of the money funding that they need for food, for the period December through May. That will require, if that does not change, reduction in rations for 8 million people.”
10. Wide shot, press briefing room

STORYLINE:

UN Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator for Yemen, David Gressly said his primary concern is not just the immediate humanitarian suffering that one sees in Yemen, but the gradual deterioration in the country, “the longer this conflict drags on, the deeper that will go,” he added.

Speaking to reporters today (16 Dec) via a video link, Gressly said that the conflict could result in a “totally transformed country, one in which you have one or two generations of young people who have not known peace, who have not known access to education, who had to find ways to survive and help their families survive.”

The Resident Coordinator also said that infrastructure is “easy” to rebuild, but “human capital is very difficult to rebuild.”

More importantly, he added, “the psychological toll that that takes and that kind of transformation will have stepped in. So it's extremely important that the peace efforts that are underway are sustained going forward.”

Gressly also said that “the collapse of the economy has led to a significant reduction for the most marginalized and particular income to buy food.”

He added, “and you combine that with the restrictions placed on the economy because of the conflict, the inspections, the port closures, the kinds of checkpoints and multiple taxation that takes place in this kind of environment, also drives up the price of commodities.”

He explained, “most of the food that comes to Yemen, whether it's commercial, or humanitarian, most of its commercial, 90 per cent of the food that comes in country is imported. So if the price is determined by the cost of food coming in and its distribution internally, that is multiplied multiple times that costs.”

On funding, the Resident Coordinator said, “we've benefited from about $2.2 billion coming in to support the people of Yemen. But that's only about, it's less than 60 per cent of the requirements. And so we're still short about $1.6 billion at this point in time, having $3.8 that we requested.”

He highlighted that “we are facing a bit of a crisis as we go into 2022. For example, the World Food Program, its pipeline is so weak going into 2022. They only have 30 per cent of the money funding that they need for food, for the period December through May. That will require, if that does not change, reduction in rations for 8 million people.”
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