WHO / HEALTH AND MIGRATION

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16-Dec-2021 00:05:20
The World Health Organization (WHO) said its new Global Competency Standards for refugee and migrant health services aim to strengthen countries’ capacity to provide health services to refugees and migrants worldwide by defining the range of competencies that should be incorporated into health workers’ education and practices. WHO

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STORY: WHO / HEALTH AND MIGRATION
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SOURCE: WHO
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LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 15 DECEMBER 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND / 25 AUGUST 2021, SID, SERBIA

SHOTLIST:

25 AUGUST 2021, SID, SERBIA

1. Various shots, migrants in care centre with health workers

15 DECEMBER 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

2. Various shots, Dr Santino Severoni, Director of WHO Health and Migration Programme, looking through the Global Competency Standards
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Santino Severoni, Director of Health and Migration Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Today, when we are talking about migration and health aspects related to migration, we are referring to one billion people worldwide. One billion people made of refugees, international migrants, internal migrants, asylum seekers, IDPs or internally displaced persons. So, a very diverse group of people, which moves and is extremely relevant for the health system.”
4. Various shots, Severoni reading the Global Competency Standards
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Santino Severoni, Director of Health and Migration Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“It is important that the health system is shaped up in order to be accessible, effective, fair and the competency standards we are launching today is actually aiming to fulfil this need in supporting health care workers to be more competent, to be more effective and capable to address the diversity represented by a population which today includes migrants, refugees and asylum seekers.”

25 AUGUST 2021, SID, SERBIA

6. Various shots, migrants with health workers

15 DECEMBER 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

7. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Santino Severoni, Director of Health and Migration Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“A GP, a nurse today when they go to the hospital or to the office, they are going to meet for sure in their own waiting room, not all the people living in the place where he/she’s working, but also newcomers, migrants, refugees and to be aware of the competency needed to really be effective in this work is essential today.”

25 AUGUST 2021, SID, SERBIA

8. Various shots, migrants with health workers

15 DECEMBER 2021, GENEVA, SWITZERLAND

9. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Santino Severoni, Director of Health and Migration Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Imagine Jordan today or Lebanon today, where one third of the population is represented by the refugees and asylum seekers and migrants or countries like Turkey or Colombia, which are hosting millions of refugees because of the destabilization in the surrounding area. Well, there the healthcare workforce is called to really perform in a different way from what they've been doing in the past, being aware of a diverse type of population and patients they might be facing and the capacity to address the challenges posed in accessing to the health systems, by language barrier, by cultural barriers, by behavioural barriers.”
10. Close up, Severoni, reading the Global Competency Standards
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Santino Severoni, Director of Health and Migration Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The different health needs might be manifested in relation to the experience during the migratory process or the experience or the exposure to risk factors, of the country of origin, transit and destination. This is why it's important to contextualize and to know very well how the culture, how the language, how the religion, how the experience, individual experience, of ethnic groups living in a different country might be influencing the health outcomes and to address them when we are opening access to service for these people.”
12. Various shots, Severoni, reading the Global Competency Standards
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Santino Severoni, Director of Health and Migration Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Imagine just mental health. People on the move might be exposed because they're coming from an area in conflict, or sometimes they are exposed to migratory process, lasting even one year or two years with the tension in between the departure and arrival place. So, this can be extremely traumatizing. So, if the health care worker is not able to think about all these experiences and to address, for example, the mental health dimension, this can be or underestimated or even worse, the approach, a traditionalistic approach of health care workers might be also a trigger for mental health crisis or disturbs which otherwise would be silent.”
14. Various shots, Severoni, reading the Global Competency Standards

STORYLINE:

The World Health Organization (WHO) said its new Global Competency Standards for refugee and migrant health services aim to strengthen countries’ capacity to provide health services to refugees and migrants worldwide by defining the range of competencies that should be incorporated into health workers’ education and practices.

Dr Santino Severoni, Director of WHO’s Health and Migration Programme, said, “Today, when we are talking about migration and health aspects related to migration, we are referring to one billion people worldwide. One billion people made of refugees, international migrants, internal migrants, asylum seekers, IDPs or internally displaced persons. So, a very diverse group of people, which moves and is extremely relevant for the health system.”

Severoni stressed the importance of shaping health systems to be “accessible, effective, [and] fair.” He said competency standards aim to fulfil this need in supporting health care workers “to be more competent, to be more effective and capable to address the diversity represented by a population which today includes migrants, refugees and asylum seekers.”

WHO said the health workforce has a vital role in providing health services that are inclusive and respectful of a person’s cultural, religious, and linguistic needs. With the right training, WHO said health workers would develop the competencies to adapt and provide services appropriate for each person’s culture and needs. As these competencies are integrated into health care approaches the resilience of health systems to respond to the health care needs of refugees and migrants is strengthened, the Organization said.

Severoni said, “Imagine Jordan today or Lebanon today, where one third of the population is represented by the refugees and asylum seekers and migrants or countries like Turkey or Colombia, which are hosting millions of refugees because of the destabilization in the surrounding area. Well, there the healthcare workforce is called to really perform in a different way from what they've been doing in the past, being aware of a diverse type of population and patients they might be facing and the capacity to address the challenges posed in accessing to the health systems, by language barrier, by cultural barriers, by behavioural barriers.”

Launched for International Migrants Day 2021, the document is accompanied by a Knowledge Guide and Curriculum Guide to support its operationalization.

Health workers providing health services to migrants and refugees are invited to integrate the Standards into their daily healthcare activities. WHO said the competencies described could be tailored to the various environments that health workers operate in and take into consideration the requirements and constraints of local health systems as well as the characteristics of the diverse refugee and migrant populations.

SOUNDBITE (English) Dr Santino Severoni, Director of Health and Migration Programme, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The different health needs might be manifested in relation to the experience during the migratory process or the experience or the exposure to risk factors, of the country of origin, transit and destination. This is why it's important to contextualize and to know very well how the culture, how the language, how the religion, how the experience, individual experience, of ethnic groups living in a different country might be influencing the health outcomes and to address them when we are opening access to service for these people.”

The Director of the Health and Migration Programme said people on the move might also be exposed things that could affect their mental health, such as conflict or traumatizing migratory processes He said, “If the health care worker is not able to think about all these experiences and to address, for example, the mental health dimension, this can be or underestimated or even worse, the approach, a traditionalistic approach of health care workers might be also a trigger for mental health crisis or disturbs which otherwise would be silent.”

This is the first set of Competency Standards to be developed for health workers who provide health services to refugees and migrants as well as for educational institutions to incorporate these standards and foundational knowledge and skills into health worker training.
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