SOUTH SUDAN / WOMEN PARLIAMENTARIANS

Preview Language:   Original
08-Dec-2021 00:03:18
The United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) is helping South Sudanese women parliamentarians to take their rightful place at the table with their male peers by holding a series of workshops on their role and the inner workings of government. UNMISS

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STORY: SOUTH SUDAN / WOMEN PARLIAMENTARIANS
TRT: 03:18
SOURCE: UNMISS
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGES: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 08 DECEMBER 2021, JUBA, SOUTH SUDAN

SHOTLIST:

1. Pan left, from speaker to attendees
2. Wide shot, podium
3. Med shot, attendees
4. Med shot attendees seated
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Bennet, Head, Political Affairs Division, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS):
“In South Sudan as in everywhere, women make up approximately 50 per cent of the population. I think this constitution making process, this permanent constitution-making process should set the tone for political debate over decades, not just the forthcoming few years and as such it’s important that every single South Sudanese citizen understands the process and finds a way for their voices to be heard and input into the process. Of course, women making up the 50 per cent are absolutely vital in that, especially in their role as peacemakers and bringing that perspectives into the process.”
6. Med shot, parliamentarians seated
7. Med shot, Lucy Aya seated
8. SOUNDBITE (English) Lucy Aya, Transitional National Legislative Assembly, South Sudan:
“The girls are supposed to be submissive; the boys are more superior to the girls. That is how we were brought up. This is still continuing till today Women are seen as inferior and men are seen as superior…
When we go to the village people only want to hear the men, what men are saying. What we say is not very much important sometimes. That is a challenge we have.”
9. Wide shot, parliamentarians seated
10. Med shot, Mary Yak seated
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Mary Yak, Parliamentarian, Western Bahr El Ghazal, South Sudan:
“Women in parliament are trying their best to do a lot for the community and to speak to issues [faced by] women. As it is, we are getting there little by little. The current parliament actually has a number of women. I started as an activist speaking to the cause of the liberation of South Sudan and the South Sudanese people. That’s how I got into politics, that’s how I got into the parliament.”
12. Med shot, woman seated typing on laptop
13. Wide shot, parliamentarians seated
14. SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Bennet, Head, Political Affairs Division, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS):
“It’s empowering them, teaching them, helping their knowledge of constitution-making processes and the importance of their role with regard to the civilian population and especially with regard to women representing the voice of women.”
15. Med shot, moderator at podium
16. Med shot, parliamentarian seated looking at podium

STORYLINE:

The United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS) is helping South Sudanese women parliamentarians to take their rightful place at the table with their male peers by holding a series of workshops on their role and the inner workings of government.

Today’s workshop (8 Dec) is focusing on the constitution-making process and priority legislation.

SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Bennet, Head, Political Affairs Division, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS):
“In South Sudan as in everywhere, women make up approximately 50 per cent of the population. I think this constitution making process, this permanent constitution-making process should set the tone for political debate over decades, not just the forthcoming few years and as such it’s important that every single South Sudanese citizen understands the process and finds a way for their voices to be heard and input into the process. Of course, women making up the 50 per cent are absolutely vital in that, especially in their role as peacemakers and bringing that perspectives into the process.”

UNMISS is supporting the South Sudan Women’s Empowerment Network as it embarks on a series of workshops that have a single focus: To harness the power of female parliamentarians in conceiving, actioning and implementing legislation that ensures women are involved in decisions on key issues that impact them directly.

64-year-old Lucy Aya from the Transitional National Legislative Assembly and other experienced parliamentarians are using these workshops to help younger women in politics overcome a traditionally patriarchal culture, speak up and speak out.

SOUNDBITE (English) Lucy Aya, Transitional National Legislative Assembly, South Sudan:
“The girls are supposed to be submissive; the boys are more superior to the girls. That is how we were brought up. This is still continuing till today Women are seen as inferior and men are seen as superior…
When we go to the village people only want to hear the men, what men are saying. What we say is not very much important sometimes. That is a challenge we have.”

With 35 percent affirmative action in place and a strong women’s caucus in parliament, South Sudan is beginning a long journey towards ensuring women’s full and equal participation.

SOUNDBITE (English) Mary Yak, Parliamentarian, Western Bahr El Ghazal, South Sudan:
“Women in parliament are trying their best to do a lot for the community and to speak to issues [faced by] women. As it is, we are getting there little by little. The current parliament actually has a number of women. I started as an activist speaking to the cause of the liberation of South Sudan and the South Sudanese people. That’s how I got into politics, that’s how I got into the parliament.”

As this young nation stands on the cusp of establishing itself as true democracy, UNMISS is making all efforts to support women at all levels and from all communities.

SOUNDBITE (English) Guy Bennet, Head, Political Affairs Division, United Nations Mission in South Sudan (UNMISS):
“It’s empowering them, teaching them, helping their knowledge of constitution-making processes and the importance of their role with regard to the civilian population and especially with regard to women representing the voice of women.”
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UNMISS
Alternate Title
unifeed211208b
Asset ID
2694911