GENEVA / COVID-19 MANDATORY VACCINATION

Preview Language:   Original
19-Nov-2021 00:03:26
As Austria announced today that it will go into its fourth nationwide lockdown amid soaring cases of COVID-19 infections, the Alpine country will also become the first European country to make vaccinations against COVID-19 mandatory starting in February 2022. UNTV CH

Available Language: English
Type
Language
Format
Acquire
/
English
Other Formats
Description
STORY: GENEVA / COVID-19 MANDATORY VACCINATION
TRT: 3:26
SOURCE: UNTV CH
RESTRICTIONS: NONE
LANGUAGE: ENGLISH / NATS

DATELINE: 19 NOVEMBER 2021, GENEVA, SWTIZERLAND

SHOTLIST:

19 NOVEMBER 2021, GENEVA, SWTIZERLAND

1. Wide shot, Palais des Nations exterior
2. Wide shot, inside press conference room, showing speakers and participants
3. SOUNDBITE (English) Fadela Chaib, spokesperson, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Is vaccination mandatory? No. Immunization policies are decided within the national domain. It is up to countries to decide. WHO guidance aims to demonstrate the benefits and safety of vaccines for the greatest possible acceptance of vaccines rather than impose mandatory vaccination. So, this is the official WHO position.”
4. Close up, journalist seated and masked, listening to the press briefing, a TV screen in the background showing a speaker
5. SOUNDBITE (English) Elizabeth Throssell, spokesperson, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR):
“The requirement that states employ the least intrusive option to achieve the desired results. I mean, again, they really should use all measures available to encourage people to get vaccinated in the first place. That includes public information campaigns and particularly those aimed at communities and groups that are marginalized or have a higher rate of vaccine hesitancy. We would say that that is important. Obviously, Austria has decided to proceed to mandatory vaccination.”
6. Close up, a participant taking notes at press conference
7. SOUNDBITE (English) Fadela Chaib, spokesperson, World Health Organization (WHO):
“Countries should really take a risk-based approach to make a decision in curbing the transmission of COVID based on assessment of their own epidemiological situation.”
8. Close up, journalist seated and masked, attending meeting
9. SOUNDBITE (English) Fadela Chaib, spokesperson, World Health Organization (WHO):
“It has some, as I said, ethical, human rights implications. So, countries should look at this very closely and take into consideration also groups of people who cannot be vaccinated because of any medical condition. Or, they do not have access to a vaccine, this is also a situation where people want to get vaccinated, but they don’t have access to vaccines.”
10. Close up, journalist
11. SOUNDBITE (English) Fadela Chaib, spokesperson, World Health Organization (WHO):
“The solution is not only in the hands of governments, it’s also the individual behavior to try to curb down the number of COVID and to reduce transmission.”
12. Close up, a technician supervises briefing on Zoom
13. SOUNDBITE (English) Elizabeth Throssell, spokesperson, Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR):
“Restrictions must be based on law that is in force and publicly accessible. ‘Necessary’ and what we mean by that is that it must be – the restrictions or the actions taken must be necessary to achieve a legitimate aim and, in this case, we are talking about public health. And they must respond to a pressing social need. So, obviously the context of this is rising COVID cases in some countries. ‘Proportionate’: the action must be proportionate to the interest at stake, proportionate to achieve its aim, and it should be the least intrusive option among those that could be achieved. And this is really an important final point here is ‘non-discriminatory’.”
14. Close up, a journalist, masked, standing in conference room
15. Close up, participants attending meeting
16. Med shot, technician supervises briefing on Zoom while a TV screen shows two speakers in background
17. Med shot, participant at press conference

STORYLINE:

As Austria announced today that it will go into its fourth nationwide lockdown amid soaring cases of COVID-19 infections, the Alpine country will also become the first European country to make vaccinations against COVID-19 mandatory starting in February 2022.

Asked today (19 Nov) by journalists at a press briefing at the United Nations in Geneva whether vaccinations should be compulsory, Fadela Chaibe, the spokesperson of the World Health Organization (WHO) said, “No, immunization policies are decided within the national domain. It is up to countries to decide. WHO guidance aims to demonstrate the benefits and safety of vaccines for the greatest possible acceptance of vaccines rather than impose mandatory vaccination. So, this is the official WHO position.”

Austria, a country of 8.9 million, has one of the lowest vaccination rates in Western Europe — only 65.7 percent of the population are fully vaccinated.

Elizabeth Throssell, Spokesperson for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR) emphasized that “the requirement that states employ should be the least intrusive option to achieve the desired results”. She added that “they really should use all measures available to encourage people to get vaccinated in the first place. That includes public information campaigns and particular those aimed at communities and groups that are marginalized or have a higher rate of vaccine hesitancy. We would say that that is important. Obviously, Austria has decided to proceed to mandatory vaccination.”

Earlier this month, Austria introduced rules that barred unvaccinated people from restaurants.

According to WHO’s Fadela Chaib, “countries should really take a risk-based approach to make a decision in curbing the transmission of COVID based on assessment of their own epidemiological situation.”

She added that “it has some, as I said, ethical, human rights implications. So, countries should look at this very closely and take into consideration also groups of people who cannot get vaccinated because of any medical condition. Or, they do not have access to a vaccine, this is also a situation where people want to get vaccinated, but they don’t have access to vaccines.”

WHO’s spokesperson also stressed that “the solution is not only in the hands of governments, it’s also the individual behaviour to try to curb down the number of COVID and to reduce transmission.”

OHCHR’s Liz Throssells also refers to the principles of international human rights law where restrictions must be necessary, proportionate and non-discriminatory.

“Restrictions must be based on law that is in force and publicly accessible,” Throssell said. “‘Necessary’ and what we mean by that is that it must be – the restrictions or the actions taken must be necessary to achieve a legitimate aim and, in this case, we are talking about public health. And they must respond to a pressing social need. So, obviously the context of this is rising COVID cases in some countries. ‘Proportionate’: the action must be proportionate to the interest at stake, proportionate to achieve its aim, and it should be the least intrusive option among those that could be achieved. And this is really an important final point here is ‘non-discriminatory’.”

While countries, including Italy and France, have made vaccination against COVID-19 mandatory for health workers, Austria will be the first country in Europe to apply such a requirement for the society at large.
Series
Category
Creator
UNTV CH
Alternate Title
unifeed211119c
Asset ID
2689112